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  #46 (permalink)  
Old Tue Mar 27, 2018, 07:45pm
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Originally Posted by BillyMac View Post
That's why, here in my little corner of Connecticut, we've moved from years of experience as a requirement to move up to varsity assignments, to observations, observations that can be done during preseason scrimmages, to properly assign an official who has moved into our area, to a varsity schedule, if he's skilled enough. If he has an IAABO background, he doesn't even have to be observed, he just keeps the status he had with his previous IAABO board.

I moved to Wisconsin and gave an assigner a link to a YouTube channel that featured a game I worked the previous year. That was enough to get a 25-game varsity schedule my first season.

Beat that, IAABO people.

BM, I admire your local boardís efforts to be more welcoming, but until you drop the grade sheets and become more subjective, my guess is that new guys will continue to be on the outside looking in with respect to their schedules. How many college evaluators do you see at camps with grade sheets? They know who can work just by watching them for five minutes.

Protectionism is why Iím probably not going to work while I live in Rhode Island next year. Cutting through the red tape in places where itís thick is exhausting.



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  #47 (permalink)  
Old Wed Mar 28, 2018, 04:31pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crosscountry55 View Post
I admire your local board’s efforts to be more welcoming, but until you drop the grade sheets and become more subjective, my guess is that new guys will continue to be on the outside looking in with respect to their schedules.
Almost all of our 300 plus officials, veterans, rookies, varsity, junior varsity, freshman, middle school, are observed two, or three, times a season by trained observers (twenty-plus experienced guys, and gals, who have served on our board's training committees, and who have been selected as state tournament officials), who write a short report regarding appearance and conditioning, mechanics, team work, judgment, and game management. Feedback is given if asked for.

All of us use Arbiter to rate our partners, on the same qualities stated above. Anonymous ratings numbers (and averages), and comments (if made) can be viewed on Arbiter by officials a few times each season (Arbiter is "opened up").

At the end of the season the observation team gets together, and discusses each official. While peer ratings might be utilized, the observations by the trained team members are given the most (by far) weight. By the end of the meeting, each official is determined to be varsity eligible, or subvarsity eligible.

We've been doing it this way for about three years, or so (after using a strictly numerical system involving exams, meetings attended, years of experience, peer ratings, availability, etc., for over thirty years), and we all seem to like the new system, that is, I haven't heard any complaints, not a single one.

Observation team members that observe on their off nights get a discount on their annual dues. Most observations are made at game assignments (varsity partner and subvarsity officials). Our assistant assignment commissioner, who gets a stipend ($3,000, he also assigns preseason scrimmages, and Special Olympics tournaments), coordinates all the observations.
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Last edited by BillyMac; Wed Mar 28, 2018 at 06:43pm.
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  #48 (permalink)  
Old Sat Apr 07, 2018, 07:20pm
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Originally Posted by BillyMac View Post
I can't disagree with you regarding the behind the head signal.

We've got more than just a few guys who use the team control foul "punch" for a player control foul (especially as a preliminary signal). It certainly looks strong and decisive (certainly stronger and more decisive than the behind the head signal).

Why don't the powers that be (NFHS or IAABO) change to this signal? I know the definitions of a player control foul and a team control foul are not 100% exactly the same (airborne shooter), but that can't be the only reason why we keep the antiquated behind the head signal.

Mark T. DeNucci, Sr. was using the behind the head signal when there were peach baskets, and laced basket balls (two words).
For my player control foul signal, I stop the clock with a raised fist in the direction that play came from, I put the other hand behind my head, and I punch forward with the hand that stopped the clock. While I do this, I slide forward with the foot on the same side as the hand that punches forward. Thus, I combine the book signal with the punch used for a team control foul and the direction that play will go. I also say "player control (foul)", and will give a supplementary signal if needed (player with the ball wards off an opponent). For my "score the goal" signal, I use a fist (or open hand, if the shot in question is a last second shot), drop the hand to about waist level, and show the appropriate number of fingers (or the number of fingers followed by the three point attempt made signal, if a three-point shot). I do not use the downward punch for the "score the goal" signal.
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  #49 (permalink)  
Old Sun Apr 08, 2018, 07:18am
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Charge ...

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Originally Posted by ilyazhito View Post
... say "player control" ...
I also state "Player control", one of the few who does so, most others state, "Charge" (even for the rare player control foul that is not a charge, for example a one hand push).
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Last edited by BillyMac; Sun Apr 08, 2018 at 07:25am.
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  #50 (permalink)  
Old Sun Apr 08, 2018, 09:51am
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Originally Posted by BillyMac View Post
I also state "Player control", one of the few who does so, most others state, "Charge" (even for the rare player control foul that is not a charge, for example a one hand push).
I don't think I say ANYTHING. Punch it and report it.
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  #51 (permalink)  
Old Sun Apr 08, 2018, 12:54pm
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Originally Posted by Rich View Post
I don't think I say ANYTHING. Punch it and report it.
Agreed. Sometimes I think officials try and say too much. I let my signals do most of my talking. To each his own, I guess.

And I also punch on PC fouls at the spot and give the "hand behind the head" at the table. I would never give that weak signal as my prelim.
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  #52 (permalink)  
Old Sun Apr 08, 2018, 04:00pm
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Originally Posted by Rich View Post
I don't think I say ANYTHING. Punch it and report it.
Unless your state uses a different standard for high school games, such as GA using women's college mechanics, the NFHS mechanics manual requires officials to give a preliminary signal at the spot of the foul, verbally inform the offender, indicate the outcome (shots or designated spot throw in), and only then proceed to the reporting area.

Because the manual requires me to verbally inform the offender, I say the offender's color and number, and the type of foul. Afterwards, I point at the spot or show fingers for the number of shots, and then proceed to the reporting area.

Is there any difference in the CCA men's or women's manual for foul reporting procedures? Unless it is not required to inform the offender, I would continue to do so in NCAA games, if and when I reach that level.
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  #53 (permalink)  
Old Sun Apr 08, 2018, 04:09pm
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Originally Posted by ilyazhito View Post
Unless your state uses a different standard for high school games, such as GA using women's college mechanics, the NFHS mechanics manual requires officials to give a preliminary signal at the spot of the foul, verbally inform the offender, indicate the outcome (shots or designated spot throw in), and only then proceed to the reporting area.



Because the manual requires me to verbally inform the offender, I say the offender's color and number, and the type of foul. Afterwards, I point at the spot or show fingers for the number of shots, and then proceed to the reporting area.



Is there any difference in the CCA men's or women's manual for foul reporting procedures? Unless it is not required to inform the offender, I would continue to do so in NCAA games, if and when I reach that level.

Are you serious? Or are you trolling us?


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  #54 (permalink)  
Old Sun Apr 08, 2018, 04:35pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ilyazhito View Post
Unless your state uses a different standard for high school games, such as GA using women's college mechanics, the NFHS mechanics manual requires officials to give a preliminary signal at the spot of the foul, verbally inform the offender, indicate the outcome (shots or designated spot throw in), and only then proceed to the reporting area.

Because the manual requires me to verbally inform the offender, I say the offender's color and number, and the type of foul. Afterwards, I point at the spot or show fingers for the number of shots, and then proceed to the reporting area.

Is there any difference in the CCA men's or women's manual for foul reporting procedures? Unless it is not required to inform the offender, I would continue to do so in NCAA games, if and when I reach that level.
Are they going to send a stern letter home to their mother if they don't?

Honestly, who gives shit what the NF thinks on this? I don't and I do not work for the NF and my state has never asked us to do any such thing either way. This is a personal officiating issue which you can say things based on who you are with. And I have never been in any college camp (with people that sit on the NCAA Committee) and said a single word to any such official about what they verbally say one way or another.

You clearly need to get some more experience before you make such statements. Three years of JV ball is not doing you very well at this point. You need to go to camps completely outside of your state before you start telling us what should or should not be done.

Peace
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  #55 (permalink)  
Old Sun Apr 08, 2018, 05:52pm
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Originally Posted by Rich View Post
Are you serious? Or are you trolling us?


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Could be both.
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  #56 (permalink)  
Old Sun Apr 08, 2018, 06:02pm
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Originally Posted by ilyazhito View Post
Unless your state uses a different standard for high school games, such as GA using women's college mechanics, the NFHS mechanics manual requires officials to give a preliminary signal at the spot of the foul, verbally inform the offender, indicate the outcome (shots or designated spot throw in), and only then proceed to the reporting area.

Because the manual requires me to verbally inform the offender, I say the offender's color and number, and the type of foul. Afterwards, I point at the spot or show fingers for the number of shots, and then proceed to the reporting area.

Is there any difference in the CCA men's or women's manual for foul reporting procedures? Unless it is not required to inform the offender, I would continue to do so in NCAA games, if and when I reach that level.
Water through the nose.

I would LOVE to hear the feedback the clinicians give you when you go to a college camp and give a prelim on every foul.
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  #57 (permalink)  
Old Sun Apr 08, 2018, 06:20pm
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Originally Posted by SC Official View Post
Water through the nose.

I would LOVE to hear the feedback the clinicians give you when you go to a college camp and give a prelim on every foul.
And stand there and call out the color and number of the fouler, too.
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  #58 (permalink)  
Old Sun Apr 08, 2018, 06:25pm
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Originally Posted by Rich View Post
Are you serious? Or are you trolling us?


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I was seriously asking a question. I haven't done any college games, so I'm trying to understand if foul reporting procedures are different for college than for high school, both according to the CCA manuals and how they are actually done in practice. If they are, I will follow what is written in the appropriate CCA manual when I go to college tryout camps. If not, I will default to NFHS SOP.

AFAIK, in my games in DC and MD, no one told me that I should not follow the reporting procedure in the NFHS manual, because both Board 12 and MBOA use the NFHS manual as a basis for their mechanics.

I don't understand why JRutledge and other users believe that I am trying to insult them. I am trying to learn by sharing my experiences and asking questions about things that I may not understand. I do not want to have to say this on a public forum, but I will. I have Asperger's Syndrome, a disorder on the autism spectrum, which makes it more difficult for me to understand people than it may be for a normal person. I also may understand things literally, and may not understand unwritten rules, or deviations from written rules. Asperger's Syndrome is not without its strengths: I am a highly logical thinker, I pay attention to details, I am persistent in pursuing my interests (officiating is one of them), and I can remember many relevant facts. With proper support, I might be able to become "The Rule Guy (TM)" on a varsity, collegiate, or professional crew .
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  #59 (permalink)  
Old Sun Apr 08, 2018, 06:27pm
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Hypothetical: Imagine ilyazhito with his strict mechanics PLUS Nevadaref with his strict rules interpretations. Now imagine them together on the floor working a 2-person game.

Iíd pay to see it. The game would be an afterthought.


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  #60 (permalink)  
Old Sun Apr 08, 2018, 06:35pm
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That would be cool! Add Mark T. DeNucci, Sr. as the third official, and that would be perfect! ROFL!
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