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  #31 (permalink)  
Old Thu Feb 08, 2007, 01:59am
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SanDiegoSteve
Well, I tried one for two years. I gave it two full seasons of a tryout. When I return to umpiring, I'm going back to a mask and 6-stitch hat. Typical reasons, the heat, the noise, the ringing of the ears. You really do feel like you have gotten your bell rung much more than with a mask.

Now, Nick...I think you need to respect everyone's opinion on the subject of HSM's, not just the people who have tried them. You don't need to eat horse poop to know that it doesn't taste good, and some folks know without a doubt that they would not like the helmet either. You can't expect people to switch over, or even try the HSM. Their opinion is just as valid as those who have tried them.
Steve,

When someone who admits they have not tried an HSM, starts saying they don't like specific aspects of it, like; "It's too hot", or "It rings too loud when hit", is not speaking their opinion. They are merely repeating what someone else has said.

Now, if they say they don't like the way it looks, OK, that is 'their' opinion.

How many times did your parents make you taste something before they would listen to you whine about not liking it ?

And for the record, I bet there are people out there who think Horse Poop tastes good (considering all the sicko's out there). Being someone who has actually tasted Horse Poop (bucked off into a pile of it as a kid), my expert opinion is that it tastes pretty bad !
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  #32 (permalink)  
Old Thu Feb 08, 2007, 02:27am
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nickrego
Steve,

When someone who admits they have not tried an HSM, starts saying they don't like specific aspects of it, like; "It's too hot", or "It rings too loud when hit", is not speaking their opinion. They are merely repeating what someone else has said.

Now, if they say they don't like the way it looks, OK, that is 'their' opinion.

How many times did your parents make you taste something before they would listen to you whine about not liking it ?

And for the record, I bet there are people out there who think Horse Poop tastes good (considering all the sicko's out there). Being someone who has actually tasted Horse Poop (bucked off into a pile of it as a kid), my expert opinion is that it tastes pretty bad !
I don't know of anyone out there that has not tried an HSM, who goes around saying things like "it's too hot," or "It rings too loud." I only hear these people say that they don't want to wear them. The people who have worn them are the ones who comment about the heat and that deafening ringing.

Last summer, I suffered heat stroke during a game, in which the temperature was upward of 106 degrees with extremely high humidity. It was the hottest day on record for that date, and it was a miserable day. I feel that the intense heat inside my helmet contributed significantly to the problem which I suffered.

I feel that if I had been using a traditional mask, that I could have continued, as my face and head would have been much cooler. As it was, the director and some concerned tournament personnel insisted on pulling me off the field in the last of the 5th inning, in fear for my health and safety.

That is the reason I am switching back to a regular mask and hat the next time I work a ballgame.
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  #33 (permalink)  
Old Thu Feb 08, 2007, 05:11pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PWL
This has got to be your best one yet. Now you're blaming heat stroke on a hockey style mask. Do you realize how many people suffer heat stroke every year and do not wear a hockey style mask?

Please describe your symptoms so everyone will know when we are suffering from a heat stroke. Also, please tell what you did after you suffered your heat stroke.

If you would have had a heat stroke, I'm quite certain we would have heard about long before now.

Nothing that you wrote makes any sense whatsoever.
I'm sorry, I meant to say "heat exhaustion," which is exactly what it was, not "stroke." Had I continued, it might have become heat stroke.

Because I didn't announce it to the world last year when it happened, that's why you didn't hear about it. I assure you that it did happen. You can ask Tim Haag is you need verification, as I did inform him after it happened. I didn't say that the helmet caused the heat exhaustion, just that it contributed to it. It was also the last game I worked last season, so you had better believe it affected me.

Why is it that you can't just accept what people say, without having to refute it, or ask for hard evidence? Once again, poking your pinhead where it doesn't belong.

Last edited by SanDiegoSteve; Thu Feb 08, 2007 at 05:14pm.
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  #34 (permalink)  
Old Thu Feb 08, 2007, 05:58pm
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PWL and SanDiego,

You are actually arguing over whether someone had a heat stoke/exhaustion?

No wonder people have the opinion about umpires the way they do. MY GOD!!!!

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  #35 (permalink)  
Old Thu Feb 08, 2007, 06:31pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim C
Steve:

This post of boyinblue24 shows that even when given a link he can't read it well enough to know the entire story is a fake.

Where's dumbdrum when we need him?

Regards,
Boyinblue.......DudeinBlue.........Hmmmmmmmm
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  #36 (permalink)  
Old Thu Feb 08, 2007, 07:28pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PWL
Steve,

Once again you fail to see where the wrong words lead to wrong conclusions. A heat stroke is a very severe medical condition and not to be taken slightly. It can cause organ failure and even death if not treated in a timely matter. The most common symptoms are blurred vision and aches in the neck. It's as if your body refuses to sweat. Your blood pressure will drop drastically. It's harder to get your blood pressure down than to get it up. You should immediately seek medical treatment so they can monitor you and get you started with I V treatments. You will feel light headed and faint even if you think you feel fine. Just sitting up straight makes you dizzy. Heat stroke is nothing to laugh at.

I found it strange that you used the words heat stroke and wanted to continue to umpire. If you had a heat stroke, paramedics would have been on the scene. Everyone should know the symptoms of heat stroke and exhaustion and the measures to take to prevent them before hand when working out in excessive heat. It doesn't take that much effort to look it up and see how to better prevent yourself from having what could be a fatal heat stroke.

What is heat stroke?

Heat stroke is a form of hyperthermia (abnormally elevated body temperature) with accompanying physical and neurological symptoms. Unlike heat cramps and heat exhaustion, two less-severe forms of hyperthermia, heat stroke is a true medical emergency that can be fatal if not properly and promptly treated.

The body normally generates heat as a result of metabolism, and the body is usually able to dissipate the heat by either radiation of heat through the skin or by evaporation of sweat. However, in extreme heat, high humidity, or vigorous exertion under the sun, the body may not be able to dissipate the heat and the body temperature rises, sometimes up to 106 degrees Fahrenheit or higher. Another cause of heat stroke is dehydration. A dehydrated person may not be able to sweat fast enough to dissipate heat, which causes the body temperature to rise.

The population most susceptible to hear strokes are infants, the elderly (often with associated heart diseases, lung diseases, kidney diseases, or on certain medications that make them vulnerable to heat strokes), and athletes, or outdoor workers physically exerting themselves under the sun.

What are heat stroke symptoms?

Symptoms of heat stroke can sometimes mimic those of heart attack or other conditions. Sometimes a person experiences symptoms of heart exhaustion before progressing to heart strokes. Symptoms of heat exhaustion may include nausea, vomiting, fatigue, weakness, headache, muscle cramps and aches, and dizziness. However some individuals can develop symptoms of heat stroke suddenly and rapidly without warning.

Different people may have different symptoms and signs of heat stroke. But common symptoms and signs of heart stroke include:

high body temperature
the absence of sweating, with hot red or flushed dry skin
rapid pulse
difficulty breathing
strange behavior
hallucinations
confusion
agitation
disorientation
seizure
coma
How do you treat a heat stroke victim?

Victims of heat stroke must receive immediate treatment to avoid permanent organ damage. First and foremost, cool the victim. Get the victim to a shady area, remove clothing, apply cool or tepid water to the skin (for example you may spray the victim with cool water from a garden hose), fan the victim to promote sweating and evaporation, place ice packs under armpits and groins. Monitor body temperature with a thermometer and continue cooling efforts until the body temperature drops to 101-102 degrees. Always notify emergency services (911) immediately. If their arrival is delayed, they can give you further instructions for treatment of the victim.

The most important measures to prevent heat strokes are to avoid becoming dehydrated, and to avoid vigorous physical activities in hot and humid weather. If you have to perform physical activities in hot weather, drink plenty of fluids (such as water and Gatorade), but avoid alcohol, coffee, and tea which may lead to dehydration. Take frequent breaks to hydrate yourself. Wear hats, and light colored, and light and loose clothes.
Here were my symptoms:

Loss of equilibrium, dizziness, strange behavior, disorientation, losing the count two or three times an inning, and unable to focus/concentrate on the game (which I was working solo, and hustling all over the field in those extreme conditions).

I was well-hydrated, as I had brought several Gatorades, as well as a washrag soaking in ice cold water in my cooler. It was extremely hot that day.

After removing me as umpire, a volunteer took over, and they forced me to stay in the snack bar with a fan blowing on me, and kept me drinking more Gatorade which they supplied. They would not let me leave and drive home for about an hour after I was removed.

This was the first and only time I have ever had to be taken off the field due to heat, and only the third time I have been unable to finish a ball game. The other two occasions were due to extreme illness, and an injury.
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  #37 (permalink)  
Old Thu Feb 08, 2007, 07:54pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PWL
Steve,

Once again you fail to see where the wrong words lead to wrong conclusions. A heat stroke is a very severe medical condition and not to be taken slightly. It can cause organ failure and even death if not treated in a timely matter. The most common symptoms are blurred vision and aches in the neck. It's as if your body refuses to sweat. Your blood pressure will drop drastically. It's harder to get your blood pressure down than to get it up. You should immediately seek medical treatment so they can monitor you and get you started with I V treatments. You will feel light headed and faint even if you think you feel fine. Just sitting up straight makes you dizzy. Heat stroke is nothing to laugh at.

I found it strange that you used the words heat stroke and wanted to continue to umpire. If you had a heat stroke, paramedics would have been on the scene. Everyone should know the symptoms of heat stroke and exhaustion and the measures to take to prevent them before hand when working out in excessive heat. It doesn't take that much effort to look it up and see how to better prevent yourself from having what could be a fatal heat stroke.

What is heat stroke?

Heat stroke is a form of hyperthermia (abnormally elevated body temperature) with accompanying physical and neurological symptoms. Unlike heat cramps and heat exhaustion, two less-severe forms of hyperthermia, heat stroke is a true medical emergency that can be fatal if not properly and promptly treated.

The body normally generates heat as a result of metabolism, and the body is usually able to dissipate the heat by either radiation of heat through the skin or by evaporation of sweat. However, in extreme heat, high humidity, or vigorous exertion under the sun, the body may not be able to dissipate the heat and the body temperature rises, sometimes up to 106 degrees Fahrenheit or higher. Another cause of heat stroke is dehydration. A dehydrated person may not be able to sweat fast enough to dissipate heat, which causes the body temperature to rise.

The population most susceptible to hear strokes are infants, the elderly (often with associated heart diseases, lung diseases, kidney diseases, or on certain medications that make them vulnerable to heat strokes), and athletes, or outdoor workers physically exerting themselves under the sun.

What are heat stroke symptoms?

Symptoms of heat stroke can sometimes mimic those of heart attack or other conditions. Sometimes a person experiences symptoms of heart exhaustion before progressing to heart strokes. Symptoms of heat exhaustion may include nausea, vomiting, fatigue, weakness, headache, muscle cramps and aches, and dizziness. However some individuals can develop symptoms of heat stroke suddenly and rapidly without warning.

Different people may have different symptoms and signs of heat stroke. But common symptoms and signs of heart stroke include:

high body temperature
the absence of sweating, with hot red or flushed dry skin
rapid pulse
difficulty breathing
strange behavior
hallucinations
confusion
agitation
disorientation
seizure
coma
How do you treat a heat stroke victim?

Victims of heat stroke must receive immediate treatment to avoid permanent organ damage. First and foremost, cool the victim. Get the victim to a shady area, remove clothing, apply cool or tepid water to the skin (for example you may spray the victim with cool water from a garden hose), fan the victim to promote sweating and evaporation, place ice packs under armpits and groins. Monitor body temperature with a thermometer and continue cooling efforts until the body temperature drops to 101-102 degrees. Always notify emergency services (911) immediately. If their arrival is delayed, they can give you further instructions for treatment of the victim.

The most important measures to prevent heat strokes are to avoid becoming dehydrated, and to avoid vigorous physical activities in hot and humid weather. If you have to perform physical activities in hot weather, drink plenty of fluids (such as water and Gatorade), but avoid alcohol, coffee, and tea which may lead to dehydration. Take frequent breaks to hydrate yourself. Wear hats, and light colored, and light and loose clothes.

Steve misquoted himself, or even better yet had a misunderstanding of the difference between heat exhaustion and heat stroke. Either way it's really none of your concern. Although, I must say you did an excellent job of plagiarizng the article on heat stroke from Medicine.net. I'll bet they appreciated it when you failed to quote them as the source of your annoying diatribe.


http://www.medicinenet.com/heat_stroke/article.htm



Tim.
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  #38 (permalink)  
Old Thu Feb 08, 2007, 09:59pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PWL
I merely cut and pasted professional information from a website.
And attempted to pass it off as your own by not sourcing the article.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PWL
I doubt if they cared since no copyright laws were violated.
You're probably right that they don't care, but it is a copyright violation to remove content from a web-site and place it elsewhere without their permission.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PWL
Remember your bootleg JEA?
If you mean the link to the JEA that a few of us found online, yes, I do remember it. The site wasn't of my creation and was shut down once it was reported to Mr. Evans that his material was available there.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PWL
I posted professional health care advice that might help save some one's life. If that is annoying to you, use the ignore function.
The information wasn't annoying to me. It was the manner in which it was presented that was annoying.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PWL
That stuff is serious business. Once you have had one, you are more likely to having another. Again, I'm sorry you find a life or death situation annoying...............
I find life or death situations to be a very serious matters. What I don't find is any amusement in the way you jumped on Steve as if he were making the story up that he had problems with the heat last season, and that he felt wearing a helmet may have contributed to the problem.
Quote:
Originally Posted by PWL
FWIW-I got the info off a public domain. It it bothers you that much, here is some more info:

WebMD's agent for copyright issues relating to this web site is as follows:

WebMD, Inc.
Attn: Office of Privacy
1175 Peachtree Street, Suite 2400
100 Colony Square
Atlanta, Georgia 30361
[email protected]


Or call: 866-788-3097
Whatever helps you sleep at night. Next time a link would be a better alternative to plagiarism.


Tim.
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  #39 (permalink)  
Old Thu Feb 08, 2007, 11:32pm
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Me, I like the darker wrapper of the maduro, but not the oscuro (a bit too oily for my taste). A Puros Indios maduro with a single malt is a nice combination.
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  #40 (permalink)  
Old Fri Feb 09, 2007, 02:46am
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Enough with the drama

Quote:
Originally Posted by PWL
Sounds like paramedics should have been called and you shouldn't have been allowed to drive under those circumstances. You could have lost consciousness and caused a fatal accident.
Sounds like you don't know how to read what I wrote. I said they would not allow me to drive home for an hour, just to be sure I was going to be OK.

It was their idea to pull me from the game. I protested, and wanted to hang in there to finish the game, with only two and a half innings remaining. They were adamant that I did not look so good, so I finally gave in to their pressure.

I did not feel that paramedics were necessary. They drove me from the field to the snack bar (located beyond the CF fence) in a golf cart. I took off my gear, and sat with a big fan blowing on me for about an hour. I was ready to leave after 20 minutes, but they insisted on keeping me longer.
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  #41 (permalink)  
Old Fri Feb 09, 2007, 08:41am
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SanDiegoSteve
I took off my gear, and sat with a big fan blowing on me for about an hour.
Did you pay the big fan for doing that? Was the the big fan male or female? Did you get the big fan out of the stands or from the Yellow Pages? How much do big fans charge for that service? Did you tip him/her?

Sigh, so many questions, so little time......

Last edited by Jurassic Referee; Fri Feb 09, 2007 at 08:44am.
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  #42 (permalink)  
Old Fri Feb 09, 2007, 11:58am
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jurassic Referee
Did you pay the big fan for doing that? Was the the big fan male or female? Did you get the big fan out of the stands or from the Yellow Pages? How much do big fans charge for that service? Did you tip him/her?

Sigh, so many questions, so little time......
Finally, you actually came up with something funny!

no, Jurassic, as I recall, you blew me for free.
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  #43 (permalink)  
Old Fri Feb 09, 2007, 10:16pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SanDiegoSteve
Finally, you actually came up with something funny!

no, Jurassic, as I recall, you blew me for free.
OOOOOOOOOHHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!! QUADRUPLE BURN!!!!!!(That's a burn 4 times as bad as a regular burn)
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  #44 (permalink)  
Old Fri Feb 09, 2007, 10:18pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jurassic Referee
Did you pay the big fan for doing that? Was the the big fan male or female? Did you get the big fan out of the stands or from the Yellow Pages? How much do big fans charge for that service? Did you tip him/her?

Sigh, so many questions, so little time......
I do agree with Tim. This is funny stuff. Good one JR!
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  #45 (permalink)  
Old Sat Feb 10, 2007, 01:02am
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SanDiegoSteve
No, but I know you did, faggot.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dictionary.com
fag·ot /ˈfægət/ Pronunciation Key - Show Spelled Pronunciation[fag-uht] Pronunciation Key - Show IPA Pronunciation
–noun
1. a bundle of sticks, twigs, or branches bound together and used as fuel, a fascine, a torch, etc.
2. a bundle; bunch.
3. a bundle of pieces of iron or steel to be welded, hammered, or rolled together at high temperature.
What does a bundle of sticks or iron have to do with this conversation?
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