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  #91 (permalink)  
Old Sat Mar 10, 2018, 08:40am
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Team catches & shoots w/ .3 left to win in WV Tournament

When I have a the last second shot, I like to align the count in my head with the count on the clock. For the reasons cited above, I count “5” when the whole seconds value switches to “4”. That way I’m only 0.1 off reality as opposed to nearly a whole second. Of course I use the visual cues of the clock/light as well, but I find that having that count in my head helps, too.


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  #92 (permalink)  
Old Sat Mar 10, 2018, 01:09pm
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The clock is not what determines the game is over alone. Why do officials insist on having a visual with the clock (which is often very high and out of the view of the court if you are clearly looking at a play) and not rely on the horn or maybe a light? What if you miss some contact or severity of the contact trying to look at the shot and the clock that might not be in a convenient place?

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  #93 (permalink)  
Old Sat Mar 10, 2018, 01:40pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JRutledge View Post
Why do officials insist on having a visual with the clock (which is often very high and out of the view of the court if you are clearly looking at a play) and not rely on the horn ...
Agree.

Here's what I always do when very close to the end of a period.

1) Make sure my partner knows that we're closing in on the end of a period (less than a minute) with an index finger in the air signal (unofficial signal), or he will signal me. If neither of us signal, the horn can give us a heart attack (already had one, no need for another).

2) If I believe that I will probably have coverage responsibility for the final shot, I will let my partner know by tapping my chest with my hand (official IAABO signal), or vice versa.

3) When I believe that we're down to about ten seconds, or so, I will take a quick peek at the clock to start my silent Cape Canaveral countdown (it helps me to anticipate the sound of the horn (only one school with lights), and it provides a backup in case the timekeeper screws up).

4) If a whistle occurs, mine, or my partner's, I will immediately look at the clock to make sure it stops in a timely manner, and if not, remember how much time to put back on the clock (even though I have trouble remembering what I had for breakfast this morning, now, where are my keys).

That's my story, and I'm sticking to it.
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Last edited by BillyMac; Sat Mar 10, 2018 at 03:56pm.
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  #94 (permalink)  
Old Sat Mar 10, 2018, 02:22pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JRutledge View Post
The clock is not what determines the game is over alone. Why do officials insist on having a visual with the clock (which is often very high and out of the view of the court if you are clearly looking at a play) and not rely on the horn or maybe a light? What if you miss some contact or severity of the contact trying to look at the shot and the clock that might not be in a convenient place?

Peace
Absolutely correct. Unless you're working in a place where the horn is really hard to hear, trying to get visual alignment is silly. Eyes on the play, ears for the horn.
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  #95 (permalink)  
Old Sat Mar 10, 2018, 03:57pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JRutledge View Post
The clock is not what determines the game is over alone. Why do officials insist on having a visual with the clock (which is often very high and out of the view of the court if you are clearly looking at a play) and not rely on the horn or maybe a light? What if you miss some contact or severity of the contact trying to look at the shot and the clock that might not be in a convenient place?

Peace
Quote:
Originally Posted by Camron Rust View Post
Absolutely correct. Unless you're working in a place where the horn is really hard to hear, trying to get visual alignment is silly. Eyes on the play, ears for the horn.

I have been an advocate of this for over 25 years.

MTD, Sr.
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  #96 (permalink)  
Old Sat Mar 10, 2018, 04:02pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Camron Rust View Post
Absolutely correct. Unless you're working in a place where the horn is really hard to hear, trying to get visual alignment is silly. Eyes on the play, ears for the horn.
And before someone comes in and says you don't need 6 eyes on the shot/play -- yes, you do. Everyone needs to have an opinion on a last second shot or drive to the rack or anything similar.

We don't need eyes on the clock once we know it's running properly. I've worked in some really, really loud gyms and I've never not heard the horn.
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  #97 (permalink)  
Old Sat Mar 10, 2018, 04:16pm
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Game's Almost Over, Give, Or Take, Fifteen Minutes ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Camron Rust View Post
Eyes on the play, ears for the horn.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark T. DeNucci, Sr. View Post
I have been an advocate of this for over 25 years.
It was only twenty five years because for the first seventy-five years of Mark T. DeNucci, Sr.'s career there was no horn, it was a sundial.



(Mark T. DeNucci, Sr. on left of image, Mark T. DeNucci, Jr. at center.)
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Last edited by BillyMac; Sat Mar 10, 2018 at 04:18pm.
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  #98 (permalink)  
Old Sat Mar 10, 2018, 04:20pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BillyMac View Post
It was only twenty five years because for the first seventy-five years of Mark T. DeNucci, Sr.'s career there was no horn, it was a sundial.



(Mark T. DeNucci, Sr. on left of image, Mark T. DeNucci, Jr. at center.)

ROTFLMTO!!


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  #99 (permalink)  
Old Sat Mar 10, 2018, 06:02pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BillyMac View Post
It was only twenty five years because for the first seventy-five years of Mark T. DeNucci, Sr.'s career there was no horn, it was a sundial.



(Mark T. DeNucci, Sr. on left of image, Mark T. DeNucci, Jr. at center.)
Actually Billy the clock was a sundial but there was indeed a horn.

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  #100 (permalink)  
Old Sat Mar 10, 2018, 06:38pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AremRed View Post
Actually Billy the clock was a sundial but there was indeed a horn.


A doubble ROTFLMTO!

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  #101 (permalink)  
Old Sat Mar 10, 2018, 11:12pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bob jenkins View Post
.3 - .39 remains in the game, but .3 "remains on the clock" as it is meant in the rules.
So, if the clock in the gym on the wall, goes to the hundredths and shows 0.39 then can't catch and shoot?
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  #102 (permalink)  
Old Sun Mar 11, 2018, 09:09am
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coach Bill View Post
So, if the clock in the gym on the wall, goes to the hundredths and shows 0.39 then can't catch and shoot?
When (enough of) those clocks are used, then the ruling bodies will adjust the rules.

Also, on the clock issue above -- most game clocks work as I described. Most shot clocks work as jeremy341a described.
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  #103 (permalink)  
Old Sun Mar 11, 2018, 12:01pm
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Who’s Trent Tucker? And Why Is There A Rule Named After Him? ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by BillyMac View Post
Sorry about the confusion. It's my fault. You guys are pretty sharp. The original NBA Trent Tucker Rule, in 1990, was "less than three tenths of a second". I took some liberties because the article is about NFHS rules.
Here's my rewrite.

The “Trent Tucker Rule” disallows any regular shot to be taken on the court if the ball is put into play with three-tenths of a second or less left in the period. The rule was born out of a game between the New York Knicks and the Chicago Bulls on January 15, 1990, at Madison Square Garden. The game was tied at 106 with one-tenth of a second left in regulation and the Knicks in possession. During a timeout called by the Knicks, both teams prepared for what was seen as the only possible way the Knicks could win in regulation, an alley-oop tapin by Patrick Ewing from an out of bounds pass. When play resumed, the inbounding Knicks player, Mark Jackson, saw the alley-oop play get broken up. He proceeded to throw the ball inbounds to Trent Tucker (Minnesota 1978–1982, NBA 1982–1993), who was the only Knicks player open. Tucker then turned around and hit a three-point jump shot before the buzzer, giving the Knicks the win, 109–106. Replays showed that the clock had not started until Tucker's shot was already in flight. Afterward, it was determined that a player could not catch, and release, a shot that quickly, and after the rule change, all an inbounder could do, with three-tenths of a second or less left in the period, was to pass the ball to a teammate and have them tip it in.

In addition to Trent Tucker, my article will detail rule changes associated with Leroy Edwards, George Mikan, Bob Kurland, Bill Russell, Wilt Chamberlain, Lew Alcindor (Kareem Abdul Jabbar), Ralph Sampson, Darryl Dawkins, Shaquille O'Neal, Patrick Ewing, Karl Malone, Hakeem Olajuwon, Allen Iverson, and Skylar Diggins. Most of these rule changes were originally instituted in NCAA, or NBA games, but these changes eventually trickled down to NFHS rules.
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Last edited by BillyMac; Sun Mar 11, 2018 at 01:56pm.
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