The Official Forum  

Go Back   The Official Forum > Football

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
  #16 (permalink)  
Old Wed Dec 14, 2005, 09:30am
Official Forum Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 183
In the end, I think it the history of the mechanic that causes you a problem. The original mechanic of winding was developed to indicate that the clock should keep running and letting everyong know why.

Now you have two things to communicate:
1. Stop the clock.
2. The clock starts on the ready.

Clearly #1 needs to get communicated first because it matters first. But since your signal for #2 is a wind signal, it would seem even more confusing if you did it in the proper order of stop clock and then signal when the clock will next start with a winding motion.

The best solution would be to change the signal for #2 so that it does use the winding of the arm which traditionally means to have the clock run.
Reply With Quote
  #17 (permalink)  
Old Fri Dec 16, 2005, 02:31am
Official Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 1,988
Re: Re: Re: Canadian Mechanics

Quote:
Originally posted by JugglingReferee
Quote:
Originally posted by Mark Dexter
Quote:
Originally posted by wwcfoa43
In Canada we never use the wind signal at the end of play. In situations where the WH needs to know if the play should start on the snap the sideline official would communicate this with an inbounds (palms down in front of body) or an OOB (thumbs over shoulder) signal.

I could see problems in your mechanics where in the last few seconds you need to stop the clock and signal that it will start on the ready. You could easily lose precious time.

I don't see it as that big of a deal. If you lose too much time, you can always reset the clock.
Accumulated over a game, you could lose many many seconds!
If it get's me into the bar quicker for a post-gae beveridge then it's my new favourite mechanic.

We need this in Canada, eh Chris and Mike?
__________________
Never underestimate the power of stupid people in large groups
Reply With Quote
  #18 (permalink)  
Old Sun Dec 18, 2005, 12:14pm
tpaul
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: Re: Re: Re: Canadian Mechanics

Quote:
Originally posted by Bob M.
Quote:
Originally posted by JugglingReferee

Accumulated over a game, you could lose many many seconds!
REPLY: JR...don't mean to disagree too strongly, but over a game, how many seconds could you really lose? If it happens 10 times, that's only 20 seconds lost at the most. In a 48 minute game, that amounts to about 0.5% of the clock. Isn't that really chump-change? I'm not arguing either way, but the lost time really doesn't matter except during the last minute or so of either half. Outside of those times, who really cares that the clock lost a second or two? Has anybody ever heard a coach complain that he would have had one more play had the officials not lost that one second in the middle of the first quarter?
I have to agree with you Bob. Kind of how we handle a first down that is close. If we are in the first quarter we don't kill it I come up and take a look at it. Then kill it for a first down or measurement (or let it run). But if we are at the end of the 2nd or 4th quarter and the LJ has something that is close and I need to look at it and we are down to the last few minutes, the LJ goes ahead and kills it. Always looks good and nobody complains.

But in the case if the officials' manual says to do it, why would n't we do it? I know the manaul for the clock operator state that if it is obvious that the clock should be stoppped then he should stop it. But I hate when clock operators do this in a blow-out game (LOL).

I think if the crew uses the proper mechanic and you have a clock operator that is paying attention there shouldn't be that much time lost.
Reply With Quote
  #19 (permalink)  
Old Sun Dec 18, 2005, 12:17pm
tpaul
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: Re: Re: Re: Canadian Mechanics

Quote:
Originally posted by ref18
Quote:
Originally posted by JugglingReferee
Quote:
Originally posted by Mark Dexter
Quote:
Originally posted by wwcfoa43
In Canada we never use the wind signal at the end of play. In situations where the WH needs to know if the play should start on the snap the sideline official would communicate this with an inbounds (palms down in front of body) or an OOB (thumbs over shoulder) signal.

I could see problems in your mechanics where in the last few seconds you need to stop the clock and signal that it will start on the ready. You could easily lose precious time.

I don't see it as that big of a deal. If you lose too much time, you can always reset the clock.
Accumulated over a game, you could lose many many seconds!
If it get's me into the bar quicker for a post-gae beveridge then it's my new favourite mechanic.

We need this in Canada, eh Chris and Mike?
bottoms up!
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:49pm.



Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.3.0 RC1