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Old Tue Jan 21, 2003, 03:08pm
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I referee NFHS subvarsity games and I always try to ask to varsity refs for feedback if they arrive early enough to see the end of my JV games.
I got some good advice yesterday, that I am hoping the board can elaborate on with some specific ideas.

1) When I was the trail I was too focused on the ball and missed several dangerous moving screens that were in my zone but away from the ball. I asked the senior ref how I could do this better and he said: "See through the play and see everything in your coverage area". I understand what this means but need to some ideas on putting it into action?
Especially when I am the trail and the ball is opposite me on the leads side, yet in my coverage area above the arc, how can I also see what is happening down my side line where the off ball screens are? How can I train myself to view the game like this?

2) Second advice was to "sell" the call on block/charge. I get the concept.What specific things do you do to sell a call without looking like a show boat ref from the NBA?(no offense if you are an NBA ref) Is just being louder good enough?

thanks again
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Old Tue Jan 21, 2003, 03:26pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by Troward
I referee NFHS subvarsity games and I always try to ask to varsity refs for feedback if they arrive early enough to see the end of my JV games.
I got some good advice yesterday, that I am hoping the board can elaborate on with some specific ideas.

1) When I was the trail I was too focused on the ball and missed several dangerous moving screens that were in my zone but away from the ball. I asked the senior ref how I could do this better and he said: "See through the play and see everything in your coverage area". I understand what this means but need to some ideas on putting it into action?
Especially when I am the trail and the ball is opposite me on the leads side, yet in my coverage area above the arc, how can I also see what is happening down my side line where the off ball screens are? How can I train myself to view the game like this?

I think that you are being told to stop watching the ball when it's outside of your area. The only way to do that is to trust your partner & not watch the ball. Nothing magic there. As for the play you give, yes, there are times when there might be 4 eyes on the ball, but you can train yourself to look at your partners eyes. In your play, if you see your partner is watching the ball then look down through the paint (as trail). Otherwise stay with the ball. Also, as T you should be moving along the 3 point line to get the best view of the floor in front of you. Also back up & move in as needed. Idea is to work usingthe best possible angle for the widest possible focus. Make sense?

Quote:
2) Second advice was to "sell" the call on block/charge. I get the concept.What specific things do you do to sell a call without looking like a show boat ref from the NBA?(no offense if you are an NBA ref) Is just being louder good enough?

thanks again
GTW
Uhmmmm...I don't know about this selling the call stuff. Maybe your style is low-key. That's fine. Maybe what he's telling you is on some bang-bang plays you get the deer in the headlights loook or otherwise look indecisive. Being decisive is the key, IMO.

IMO 2 man is hard work. There's a lot to be covered by 4 eyes. Work to be in position at T & L, find the best angle, look decisive on your calls. Keep working at it, watch some of the big dogs work. You'll be all right.
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Old Tue Jan 21, 2003, 03:36pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by Troward

1) When I was the trail I was too focused on the ball and missed several dangerous moving screens that were in my zone but away from the ball. I asked the senior ref how I could do this better and he said: "See through the play and see everything in your coverage area". I understand what this means but need to some ideas on putting it into action?
Especially when I am the trail and the ball is opposite me on the leads side, yet in my coverage area above the arc, how can I also see what is happening down my side line where the off ball screens are? How can I train myself to view the game like this?

2
First of all, get a good book. "Basketball Officials Guidebook" from Referee Magazine and NASO is excellent. You need to know more than just your primary area; you have to know who has on and who has offball coverage. In your instance where the ball is high in the trail area but on the leads side, you have on-ball coverage. You need to get off your sideline and come out until you can get a good angle and see between the ball and the defender. While you are doing that, it is impossible for you to see off ball action (if any) on your side down near the baseline. This is where the lead needs to pick up off ball coverage as needed. You need to work these things out in your pregame. The key is that you both aren't watching the ball. If you know who has on ball and who has off ball at all times, you'll know what you are responsible for. This is where working with the same partner really pays off. In lots of circumstances, this isn't possible and until you can develop a rapport with someone, you'll just need to discuss it thoroughly during your pregame.


Quote:
Originally posted by Troward

2) Second advice was to "sell" the call on block/charge. I get the concept.What specific things do you do to sell a call without looking like a show boat ref from the NBA?(no offense if you are an NBA ref) Is just being louder good enough?

Once again, the Basketball Officals Guidebook has different mechanics for "selling" a charge call. When you are selling a call, you are trying to convince everyone in the gym, that you indeed have the correct call. If the call is obvious, no need to sell it. If it is questionable, by being demonstrative with your mechnaics, you attempt to convince everyone that you made the correct call. First off, you better be in position to see the entire play. If you are out of position, all the selling in the world isn't going to covince that coach or the fans that you made the right call. Second, do not hesitate. Immediately make your call. Be strong in both voice and mechanics. Much like a baseball umpire on a called third strike to end the inning. On a PC foul, skip the bird dog. Instead, give the closed fist followed immediately by cupping the back of your head and signalling direction with the other hand. You can also yell "Offense" for emphasis if needed. Each offical will develop their own technique they feel comfortable with. Now, that said, only sell when needed. If you try to sell fouls that don't need it, it's like crying wolf. When selling a call, you should make it clear to everyone in the gym that you are absolutely sure of the call (even if you aren't)

Hope that helps, but of course, it is just my opinon.

Mregor
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Old Tue Jan 21, 2003, 03:41pm
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>>> think that you are being told to stop watching the ball when it's outside of your area.

My question is when the ball is in my zone, and I am missing other action in my zone. Not about watching the ball outside of your zone.

thanks for the other feedback.
GTW
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Old Tue Jan 21, 2003, 03:45pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by Troward
>>> think that you are being told to stop watching the ball when it's outside of your area.

My question is when the ball is in my zone, and I am missing other action in my zone. Not about watching the ball outside of your zone.

thanks for the other feedback.
GTW
It is possible you are to close to the play. That tends to give you tunnel vision. Try maintaining a good angle on the dribbler/defender while moving 8-10 feet further away from the play than you are used to. This "opens up your cone of vision" and allows you to see the play on the dribbler as well as looking through this play and seeing the illegal screen ahead of the dribbler in your zone. I tenderd to work to close to the dribbler earlier in my career thinking this was good as I was "on top of" the play when in actuality it was blinding me to critical actions around the dribbler in my primary. This may have been what your evaluator was eluding too.

Mregor: Thumbs up for all referee publications I have quite a few of them and they are certainly helpful for all officials as they develop and advance their careers.
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Old Tue Jan 21, 2003, 03:46pm
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Troward, it could be you are too close to the play and need to widen out to get a wider angle on your area. If the dribbler is being defended and you are 4-6 feet away there is no way you will see that ugly screen that needs called. But, if you are 10-15 feet away you will be able to see some other stuff with your peripheral vision that you might be missing now.
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Old Tue Jan 21, 2003, 04:00pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by Troward
>>> think that you are being told to stop watching the ball when it's outside of your area.

My question is when the ball is in my zone, and I am missing other action in my zone. Not about watching the ball outside of your zone.

thanks for the other feedback.
GTW
Yeah, as has been said back up a bit if you need to get a wider angle. Also....here it comes....referee the defense.
Even if the ball is in your area don't concnetrate on looking for the travel or palm, etc. Keep aware of what defenders are in the area, who they are guarding & what they are doing. There's a lot to concentrate on but if Jurassic Referee can do it, then...well you know the rest.

And while I'm at it position youself so that you are not straight-lined. This helps a lot.
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Old Tue Jan 21, 2003, 06:19pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by Dan_ref
[/B]
There's a lot to concentrate on but if Jurassic Referee can do it, then...well you know the rest.

[/B][/QUOTE]Whoa,whoa,whoa there,Gunga Dan.Are we forgetting something here? This is JR you're talking to.Same name as your beloved dog.Just as cute,too(especially after I've been groomed). It's not that little guy that lives under a bridge somewhere out around Bah-ston,or that Eskimo fella that lives in an igloo U.P.in the Arctic tundra somewhere.This is the sainted,beloved and revered JR that you are talking about here. Got it?

Not really appropriate. I just like it!
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Old Tue Jan 21, 2003, 10:37pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by Troward

2) Second advice was to "sell" the call on block/charge. Is just being louder good enough?



Sell but don't oversell. I don't think that being loud is the key, but rather to be quick and decisive. Do not hesitate and look at the pile of bodies. If you have to flip your imaginary coin, do it quickly. (I only use my coin on out-of-bounds...sometimes)I personally try to keep my face expressionless so that nobody can accuse me of "taking something away from them." (They do it anyway.) If this is a close call in a close game, some people WILL be upset. But remember, this is YOUR call, and NOBODY has the authority to overrule you. Avoid second-guessing yourself during the game, and don't let a questionable call with a violent reaction make you any more likely to call the next one the other way.(MAKEUP CALL!)
This is why we get the big bucks.
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Old Tue Jan 21, 2003, 10:53pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by Troward
>>> think that you are being told to stop watching the ball when it's outside of your area.

My question is when the ball is in my zone, and I am missing other action in my zone. Not about watching the ball outside of your zone.
You're watching the ball too much when it's in your area as well. Don't watch the player with the ball. Stay wide, and watch the defenders. Referee the defense. If you do, you'll see the illegal screens.
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Old Wed Jan 22, 2003, 06:53am
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Quote:
Originally posted by Jurassic Referee
Quote:
Originally posted by Dan_ref
There's a lot to concentrate on but if Jurassic Referee can do it, then...well you know the rest.

[/B]
Whoa,whoa,whoa there,Gunga Dan.Are we forgetting something here? This is JR you're talking to.Same name as your beloved dog.Just as cute,too(especially after I've been groomed). It's not that little guy that lives under a bridge somewhere out around Bah-ston,or that Eskimo fella that lives in an igloo U.P.in the Arctic tundra somewhere.This is the sainted,beloved and revered JR that you are talking about here. Got it?

Not really appropriate. I just like it! [/B][/QUOTE]

My apologies to the wise & powerful St JR.

And I guess you and the dog have something else in common? Between groomings I mean.

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Old Wed Jan 22, 2003, 08:31am
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Quote:
Originally posted by Jurassic Referee


Is this from his Deathtongue phase? Or from the more pop-oriented Billy and the Boingers incarnation?


Chuck
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Old Wed Jan 22, 2003, 09:05am
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There has been a lot of good advice here already, but one thing that I will do is to try and be aware of what the offense is doing. Are they running a high / low, spread, or a motion offense? Knowing what they are trying to do will help me to watch for off-ball stuff. If they are using a lot of back-screens and the like I will be aware of this.

One other thing that I try to do is not to lock in on the ball handler. You can "settle" your eyes and be aware of your coverage area by having the right angle. If this doesn't work for you, then don't be afraid to move your eyes. Look for the competitive matchups in your area and keep your eyes moving on them. Either method should help to get you away from having tunnel vision.
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Old Wed Jan 22, 2003, 09:42am
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Quote:
Originally posted by ChuckElias

[/B]
Is this from his Deathtongue phase? Or from the more pop-oriented Billy and the Boingers incarnation?
[/B][/QUOTE]Billy and the Boingers!
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  #15 (permalink)  
Old Wed Jan 22, 2003, 09:44am
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selling calls

On seeling calls, I'd watch the V guys and see what they do -- you'll see various styles and find what works for you. Ultimately, in my view, the only thing that "selling" means is showing that you saw the call, you know what you're calling, and there is not a doubt in your mind that you got the call right. That means there are a million "right" ways to "sell" a call.
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