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Old Tue Feb 05, 2019, 10:52pm
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Mechanics Creep

I often see NF level officials who use non-NF mechanics/signals during a game. For example,

1) when chopping in the clock a ref will make a 'fist' and snap it in hemi-circle, instead of vertically stricking an open-hand downward. I have seen NBA and NCAA refs do this; however, to my limited knowledge this is not NF-approved?

2) when signalling a "Block" I frequently see NF level refs bouncing their closed fists off their hips several time s in a rather animated fashion; however, in my limited knowledge I believe the NF mechanic is to place both open hands on your waist between the index and thumb area.

3) when a FT attempt misses the ring entirely, I frequently see NF level refs hold up an index finger and swirl it several times; however, in my limited knowledge I believe the NF mechanic is to sound your whistle, raise your arm with an open hand, and point in the other direction [optional to say "no ring/no rim"] and indicate that we're heading the other direction.

4) when and "and 1" [player scores on an offensive rebound and gets fouled so we're shooting 1] I frequently see NF level refs do a "fist punch" signal to indicate the action; however, in my limited knowledge Ibelieve the NF mechanic is to simply hold up two fingers and strike down, then 1 finger to indicate next action [i.e., one FT is to be attempted next].

I could go on but I'll just end it here...

Aside from a 'purist' point of view, is there anything troubling about these observations?

Last edited by Kansas Ref; Tue Feb 05, 2019 at 10:59pm.
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Old Tue Feb 05, 2019, 10:56pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kansas Ref View Post
I often see NF level officials who use non-NF mechanics/signals during a game. For example, 1) when chopping in the clock a ref will make a 'fist' and snap it in hemi-circle, instead of vertically stricking an open-hand downward. I have seen NBA and NCAA refs do this; however, to my limited knowledge this is not NF-approved?

2) when signalling a "Block" I frequently see NF level refs bouncing their closed fists off their hips several time s in ar ather animated fashion; however, in my limited knowledge I believe the NF mechanic is to place both open hands on your waist between the index and thumb area.

3) when a FT attempt misses the ring entirely, I frequently see NF level refs hold up an index finger and swirl it several times; however, in my limited knowledge I believe the NF mechanic is to sound your whistle, raise your arm with an open hand, and point in the other direction [optional to say "no ring/no rim"] and indicate that we're heading the other direction.

Aside from a 'purist' point of view, is there anything troubling about these observations?
No. Any other questions?
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Old Tue Feb 05, 2019, 11:02pm
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ohhArem...
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Old Tue Feb 05, 2019, 11:05pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kansas Ref View Post
I often see NF level officials who use non-NF mechanics/signals during a game. For example, 1) when chopping in the clock a ref will make a 'fist' and snap it in hemi-circle, instead of vertically stricking an open-hand downward. I have seen NBA and NCAA refs do this; however, to my limited knowledge this is not NF-approved?
OK, it is not necessarily a college mechanic either. And no one cares but those that have nothing better to say point this out IMHO. If you go to any high level camp and someone is pointing this out seriously, they really are just nitpicking you. Never been to a college camp or worked a college game and this was ever pointed out there as not using the right mechanic. I wonder why?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Kansas Ref View Post
2) when signalling a "Block" I frequently see NF level refs bouncing their closed fists off their hips several time s in ar ather animated fashion; however, in my limited knowledge I believe the NF mechanic is to place both open hands on your waist between the index and thumb area.
Sorry, but to me this is one of the dumbest things people worry about. It looks silly if you give the signal at the time with "open hands." And the college mechanic (at least men's) shows the very same picture.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Kansas Ref View Post
3) when a FT attempt misses the ring entirely, I frequently see NF level refs hold up an index finger and swirl it several times; however, in my limited knowledge I believe the NF mechanic is to sound your whistle, raise your arm with an open hand, and point in the other direction [optional to say "no ring/no rim"] and indicate that we're heading the other direction.

Aside from a 'purist' point of view, is there anything troubling about these observations?
You realize that there was a time when kicking violation was not in the book either. Everyone used the "kicking violation signal" before it was put in the book. No one cared. This is something I do not care about either.

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Old Wed Feb 06, 2019, 03:14am
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kansas Ref View Post
I often see NF level officials who use non-NF mechanics/signals during a game. For example,

1) when chopping in the clock a ref will make a 'fist' and snap it in hemi-circle, instead of vertically stricking an open-hand downward. I have seen NBA and NCAA refs do this; however, to my limited knowledge this is not NF-approved?

2) when signalling a "Block" I frequently see NF level refs bouncing their closed fists off their hips several time s in a rather animated fashion; however, in my limited knowledge I believe the NF mechanic is to place both open hands on your waist between the index and thumb area.

3) when a FT attempt misses the ring entirely, I frequently see NF level refs hold up an index finger and swirl it several times; however, in my limited knowledge I believe the NF mechanic is to sound your whistle, raise your arm with an open hand, and point in the other direction [optional to say "no ring/no rim"] and indicate that we're heading the other direction.

4) when and "and 1" [player scores on an offensive rebound and gets fouled so we're shooting 1] I frequently see NF level refs do a "fist punch" signal to indicate the action; however, in my limited knowledge Ibelieve the NF mechanic is to simply hold up two fingers and strike down, then 1 finger to indicate next action [i.e., one FT is to be attempted next].

I could go on but I'll just end it here...

Aside from a 'purist' point of view, is there anything troubling about these observations?


I hope someday assigners and supervisors who are so anal about this stuff are gone from the game. Nobody should care. I hire for a lot of schools. I don't.

Stuff like this is #26 on my top 25 criteria for hiring someone.


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Old Wed Feb 06, 2019, 07:57am
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I'm pretty sure I do all four to some degree. Signals are meant to communicate information. IMO, as long as that information is being communicated, most should be fine with it. Obviously there are mechanic sticklers out there, but as others have said, I'm not sure why anyone should care unless it impacts the actual game in some way.

I'm more worried about both referees on a 2-person game being on the same side of the court multiple times, as I saw last night.
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Old Wed Feb 06, 2019, 08:31am
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kansas Ref View Post
I often see NF level officials who use non-NF mechanics/signals during a game. For example,

1) when chopping in the clock a ref will make a 'fist' and snap it in hemi-circle, instead of vertically stricking an open-hand downward. I have seen NBA and NCAA refs do this; however, to my limited knowledge this is not NF-approved?

2) when signalling a "Block" I frequently see NF level refs bouncing their closed fists off their hips several time s in a rather animated fashion; however, in my limited knowledge I believe the NF mechanic is to place both open hands on your waist between the index and thumb area.

3) when a FT attempt misses the ring entirely, I frequently see NF level refs hold up an index finger and swirl it several times; however, in my limited knowledge I believe the NF mechanic is to sound your whistle, raise your arm with an open hand, and point in the other direction [optional to say "no ring/no rim"] and indicate that we're heading the other direction.

4) when and "and 1" [player scores on an offensive rebound and gets fouled so we're shooting 1] I frequently see NF level refs do a "fist punch" signal to indicate the action; however, in my limited knowledge Ibelieve the NF mechanic is to simply hold up two fingers and strike down, then 1 finger to indicate next action [i.e., one FT is to be attempted next].

I could go on but I'll just end it here...

Aside from a 'purist' point of view, is there anything troubling about these observations?
The only time I worry about any of these things is if I'm working a camp game in front of a purist/older observer.

I don't use the fist for an And-1 because I don't want it confused for a punch (TC or PC foul).

I do use an open hand to chop the clock b/c I think it looks better than clenching my fist and b/c it is a pet peeve of my highest level supervisor.

I use fists to the hips for block calls b/c I don't like the open hand to the hips signal.

For airball free throws and shots that end up over the backboard or hitting a suspended object, I simply do the open hand violation signal and verbalize "violation".

I do or don't do all these things based on what I think looks best for my presentation. If you are hustling, getting into position, managing game situations, and getting plays right, those things you pointed out are not an issue to most supervisors/assignors.
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Old Wed Feb 06, 2019, 09:12am
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#2 looking like a gorilla banging your hips repeatedly will probably get you yelled at in postseason play here in Ohio.
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Old Wed Feb 06, 2019, 09:18am
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Originally Posted by SNIPERBBB View Post
#2 looking like a gorilla banging your hips repeatedly will probably get you yelled at in postseason play here in Ohio.


One bang of the hips at the spot. One gentle one at the table.

Hands on hips is a terrible mechanic that should have been modified years ago.


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Old Wed Feb 06, 2019, 09:26am
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Kansas Ref, do you give a preliminary on every foul you call and verbally inform the fouler? Aren't those things in the manual?

In my experience the people that get bent out of shape about this stuff couldn't care less about play-calling and game management. All they care about is that everything is done exactly by the book. Not surprisingly, they're not very good officials themselves. They're in the group of officials that likes to have 10-minute meetings with the captains and coaches.

At least 75% officials I work with at the HS level use fists and not open hands to signal a blocking foul. Who the hell cares that it doesn't exactly mirror the book? It's a much stronger signal that communicates the exact same message with more authority and confidence. The book also says to signal direction with four fingers; I work with very few officials that do it that way.

Officials (and assigners, quite frankly) that focus on this crap: get a life.
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Old Wed Feb 06, 2019, 09:28am
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One bang of the hips at the spot. One gentle one at the table.

Hands on hips is a terrible mechanic that should have been modified years ago.
Clearly it seems most states don't care, thankfully.
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Old Wed Feb 06, 2019, 09:46am
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This is an interesting thread from someone who gives a pregame DOG warning.....
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Old Wed Feb 06, 2019, 10:42am
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Proficient In All Aspects Of Officiating ...

My local IAABO board is all about education, it's our number one priority, the education of new officials, and the continuing education of veteran officials.

Mechanics is a part of that educational process.

After our new officials take our rules classes and pass the written rules exam, they have to take our mechanics classes and then pass the "floor exam".

After that, they are mentored by some of our best officials, and mechanics is a part, a small part, but a part, of the mentoring process.

During the season, all officials (new and veterans) are evaluated by their partners and also by trained observers, and mechanics make up 20% of the evaluation.

Evaluations lead to advancement, or sometimes, demotion.

We strive to have our officials be proficient in all aspects of officiating, rules knowledge, judgment, game management, teamwork, and mechanics.

Mechanics are often discussed at our meetings.

Sure, rules knowledge, judgment, teamwork, and game management are all much more important than standing the right spot during timeouts and intermissions.

But being a great official and having good mechanics are not necessarily mutually exclusive.

Sure, we have some guys that have perfect "robot" mechanics but don't know if the basketball is stuffed or inflated, but these guys never see the light of a varsity game.

Almost all of our top guys, the ones working the state tournament, usually deep into the state tournament, are proficient in all aspects of officiating, including mechanics.
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Last edited by BillyMac; Wed Feb 06, 2019 at 12:15pm.
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Old Wed Feb 06, 2019, 10:44am
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kansas Ref View Post
I often see NF level officials who use non-NF mechanics/signals during a game. For example,

1) when chopping in the clock a ref will make a 'fist' and snap it in hemi-circle, instead of vertically stricking an open-hand downward. I have seen NBA and NCAA refs do this; however, to my limited knowledge this is not NF-approved?

2) when signalling a "Block" I frequently see NF level refs bouncing their closed fists off their hips several time s in a rather animated fashion; however, in my limited knowledge I believe the NF mechanic is to place both open hands on your waist between the index and thumb area.

3) when a FT attempt misses the ring entirely, I frequently see NF level refs hold up an index finger and swirl it several times; however, in my limited knowledge I believe the NF mechanic is to sound your whistle, raise your arm with an open hand, and point in the other direction [optional to say "no ring/no rim"] and indicate that we're heading the other direction.

4) when and "and 1" [player scores on an offensive rebound and gets fouled so we're shooting 1] I frequently see NF level refs do a "fist punch" signal to indicate the action; however, in my limited knowledge Ibelieve the NF mechanic is to simply hold up two fingers and strike down, then 1 finger to indicate next action [i.e., one FT is to be attempted next].

I could go on but I'll just end it here...

Aside from a 'purist' point of view, is there anything troubling about these observations?
For point #1, I chop time in using an open hand.
For #2, I use open hands, but I bring both hands down forcefully on my hips.
I do not use the "swirlie", as the usage described is not even related to the way it should be used. The "swirlie" is an NBA signal for basket interference. For FT violations, I just use open hand, say what the violation is, and point the other way.
For #4, I drop the hand that was in a fist for the foul, and then show 2 fingers (or the touchdown signal, if a 3-pointer). I then show 1 finger for 1 shot. My "last-second shot scores" signal is similar, except it starts with ano open hand instead of a fist (and no free throws).
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Old Wed Feb 06, 2019, 10:45am
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rich View Post

Hands on hips is a terrible mechanic that should have been modified years ago.
Not disagreeing but why would fists be better? I also seen some saying hand behind the head for player control is a weak signal. I don't understand that either.
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