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Old Mon Oct 14, 2002, 02:05pm
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Question

I am begining my second season of officiating and I have been pondering how fast I should try to move up? Last year, I refereed middle school and bantam ball (12-13 year olds). I received a lot of positive feedback and good evaluations. I certainly want to move up to high school ball.

I don't want to move up too fast and get in over my head. My local rep and assignor have said that I can take my floor test (this year) to move up if I want to. They feel that I would be ready. My fear is that if I move up too quickly, I may get a reputation as a mediocre official.

I would like some advice (and perhaps personal experiences) on how fast do you think an official should move up?
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Old Mon Oct 14, 2002, 03:16pm
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I would say that if your assignor thinks you're ready, then take the floor test. I doubt seriously if he is going to intentionally put someone in a situation he doesn't think they can handle. The rate people move us varies. I am just starting my second year (first in my chapter) and have a few lower/mid level varsity games on my schedule. Assignment Sec. and his committee all had a chance to watch me at camps working the various levels. "Real life" is usually different than camps but I'm going to give it my best.

Now I would vote different if you said you called a scrimmage at the next level and felt out of place or intimidated/overwhelmed by the speed and skill.

We are usually our own harshes critic...sometime you have to faith in your ability.

You can also take "comfort" in that you will be calling equally good or bad for both teams
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Old Mon Oct 14, 2002, 03:29pm
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Advice -- It probably can't hurt you to take the floor test, even if you don't pass, unless you come off as totally unprofessional; which I have no doubt will definitely NOT happen. (If you were unprofessional, you wouldn't even bother asking for advice about your situation.) If you get picked up for HS ball, great. If not, then my guess is that you would at least get some good feedback on what you need to work on for next year's floor test. My advice, then, boils down to "Go for it".

Personal experience -- As I've posted elsewhere, my advancement was a "slow and steady" sort of thing. Around here, most guys get HS ball (freshmen) in their second year. I passed the IAABO test in '92, started HS ball in '93, got my first HS varsity game in '97, started college in '98, finally cracked college varsity in '01. I dabbled with minor league pro ball earlier this year and will apply for my first D1 tryout in the Spring of '03.

So you can see that I haven't made any dramatic leaps, but I have tried to continually reach for the next level. The good thing about having this gradual advancement is that I have been absolutely ready for each new step as I took it. I have never been completely overwhelmed by my first game at the new level. Don't get me wrong -- I was nervous as heck each time. But I had enough experience under my Sansabelts so that I didn't feel lost.

Go take your floor test. Knock 'em dead. Let us know how it went.

Chuck
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Old Mon Oct 14, 2002, 04:22pm
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There is no harm in taking the test. Also, do not put limits on yourself. You should know where you are and what you comfort level is. Most of us want to move up as quickly as possible. That is not bad as long as you don't get in over your head. Being aware of what you are doing and having a plan will help.
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Old Mon Oct 14, 2002, 04:49pm
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Thumbs up Not that big of a deal.

Quote:
Originally posted by Jay R
I am begining my second season of officiating and I have been pondering how fast I should try to move up? Last year, I refereed middle school and bantam ball (12-13 year olds). I received a lot of positive feedback and good evaluations. I certainly want to move up to high school ball.

I don't want to move up too fast and get in over my head. My local rep and assignor have said that I can take my floor test (this year) to move up if I want to. They feel that I would be ready. My fear is that if I move up too quickly, I may get a reputation as a mediocre official.

I would like some advice (and perhaps personal experiences) on how fast do you think an official should move up?
This might be different from your area, but all you have to do where I am from is get licensed with the state. I do not know what a floor test is or how it gets you to move up. HS ball is not the hardest thing in the world. Any young official can handle most Freshman and Sophmore. If you can handle 12 and 13 year olds, you can officiate kids that are a year older. Usually they kids are just slightly bigger and still play below the rim. So believe me, it is not that big of a jump. The bigger the kids get, the easier the game becomes for us.

Jay, what do you have to do to officiate HS games?

Peace
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Old Mon Oct 14, 2002, 07:12pm
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Go for it.
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Old Mon Oct 14, 2002, 07:19pm
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Thanks for the replies.

As for your question, Rut. I live in Atlantic Canada and we here have A and B ratings. So I do nedd an A rating if I want to referee high school games. College has a diiferent test as well.

I do appreciate your responses and it may have been the kind of encouragement I needed.

I've got a month or so to make up my mind. I'll keep you guys posted.

Jay
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Old Mon Oct 14, 2002, 07:23pm
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Don't hold yourself back. Take the floor test and let the assignor tell you what you need to work on and improve so you can be ready to call the big game. You will never improve if you don't continually push yourself to call a little bit tougher game then you are ready for. My second boys JV game was between two teams that ended up winning the state in 4a and 5a two years later. I thought I was in over my head but after surviving the game, I found that every other boys JV game was an easier game because I pushed myself to call that other game. Apperently an assignor somewhere thought I was ready for it because he did call me to go do the game. If the assignor wants you to take the floor test, do it. You won't regret it nomatter the outcome.
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Old Mon Oct 14, 2002, 07:35pm
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Lightbulb It is called expectation.

Jay,

If you think you can do something, you will find a way to make it happen. If you think you cannot do something, you will find ways not to make it happen.

I did JV games my first year. Actually they were given to me before I was even licensed as a basketball official. I did some Junior High Girl's and Boy's that fall before I did the JV game, but it was not at all a hard transition. Some officials never do JH games around here, so it really is not a big deal. Just study your rules, mechanics so whatever requirement you have you have more confidence. Confidence is everything.

Peace
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Old Mon Oct 21, 2002, 01:41am
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Wink

I started my refereeing career in Summerside PEI over 40 years ago- so we started in the same area.

To answer your question - I feel you should move to the next level as soon as you fully capable of being the "lead" official in the level you are presently doing.
Some people move up very quickly as they become capable " lead" officials at the lower levels very quickly. They must move up or they will become bored and unchallenged.
As an educator I feel that one of our main problems in BB officiating is that we don't recognize the "streamers" quickly enough and move them up to where they belong.
Of course at the very high levels there often isn't enough room and you just have to wait your turn sometimes. If you have what it takes and are persistent you WILL get there.
Good Luck
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