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  #1 (permalink)  
Old Mon Feb 12, 2007, 04:52pm
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10 second count, when does it start?

I apologize if this is a dumb question.

I have always started my 10 second count once the ball is touched by the inbounding team on a throw in. A veteran partner told me that a 10 second count actually includes the 5 seconds that are allotted for the throw in. So, for example, if a team takes 3 seconds to inbound the ball, they then only have 7 seconds to get it to their frontcourt.

I can't find any reference in the rule book stating that this is the case and obviously this would have a huge impact on games so I need to know the correct way.
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  #2 (permalink)  
Old Mon Feb 12, 2007, 04:53pm
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Please define veteran partner!
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Old Mon Feb 12, 2007, 04:55pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mjbofficial
A veteran partner told me that a 10 second count actually includes the 5 seconds that are allotted for the throw in.
Are you sure your "veteran partner" isn't actually a coach? Or...Billy Packer?

See NF 9-8.
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  #4 (permalink)  
Old Mon Feb 12, 2007, 04:56pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadNewsRef
Please define veteran partner!
He's been officiating for ~ 8 years....a really nice guy. I didn't think it sounded right and I haven't asked because I felt like it was a really dumb question and that I possibly had been doing something wrong all year.
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  #5 (permalink)  
Old Mon Feb 12, 2007, 04:58pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Padgett
Are you sure your "veteran partner" isn't actually a coach? Or...Billy Packer?

See NF 9-8.
9-8 just states that the ball can't be in the backcourt for 10 seconds, but doesn't mention if the time it takes to inbound the ball counts towards that.

I thought it sounded strange, but this was a veteran guy so it surprises me that he would tell me that.
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  #6 (permalink)  
Old Mon Feb 12, 2007, 05:05pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mjbofficial
9-8 just states that the ball can't be in the backcourt for 10 seconds, but doesn't mention if the time it takes to inbound the ball counts towards that.
If the ball is OOB, it's not in the backcourt.
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Old Mon Feb 12, 2007, 05:15pm
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There is no backcourt until a team has established control. Put another way; team control must be established in order to determine where the backcourt is. A player must be holding or dribbling the ball in bounds in order to establish team control.
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Old Mon Feb 12, 2007, 05:18pm
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9-8 states that "A player shall not be, nor may his/her team be, in continuous control of a ball which is in his/her backcourt for 10 seconds." There is no team control or player control on a throw-in (4-12-6), so until the throw-in has ended there can be no player or team control. The count would start when player control is established after the throw-in ends.
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Old Mon Feb 12, 2007, 05:28pm
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Thanks guys. I figured that was the case, I just didn't want to ask a stupid question.
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  #10 (permalink)  
Old Mon Feb 12, 2007, 06:22pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed Maeder
9-8 states that "A player shall not be, nor may his/her team be, in continuous control of a ball which is in his/her backcourt for 10 seconds." There is no team control or player control on a throw-in (4-12-6), so until the throw-in has ended there can be no player or team control. The count would start when player control is established after the throw-in ends.
Yup. The throw-in ends when the ball is touched on the court. The 10-second count starts when the offensive team gains player control in their backcourt-i.e.a player is holding or dribbling the ball. There also might be a lapse of quite a few seconds between the end of the throw-in and the establishment of player control.

It always amazes me to see officials starting their backcourt count when the ball was touched but not controlled, and was still loose.
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Old Mon Feb 12, 2007, 08:41pm
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Rookie Mistake

I hate to admit this, but I still remember a mistake I made over twenty-years ago in a junior varsity game. After a made free throw, I called a ten-second backcourt violation. The coach went nuts because only 8 seconds had ticked off the clock since the made free throw. I had to give him a technical foul, one of the few given throughout my career. In the car on our way home after the game, my partner and I discussed the play. We wondered if the timekeeper had started the clock too late, or if I had counted too fast. We finally figured out that because of a pressing defense, the inbounding team had taken four seconds to get the ball inbounds, and I had mistakenly carried over the four second count into my ten second count. I knew the correct rule, I just screwed it up. After the ball was inbounded, I only counted six more counts, in eight seconds, to call the violation. I called the athletic director the next day and asked her to apoligize to the coach for me. The next time I saw the coach, we both laughed about it.

Our local board interpreter now advises us to use two different arms to make these two counts so this mistake doesn't happen. If we make the five second count with our right arm, we switch over to our left arm for the ten second count. Our interpreter also advises us to switch arms as we change our five second closely guarded counts, from a dribbling count to a holding count or from a holding count to a dribbling count.
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Old Mon Feb 12, 2007, 08:52pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BillyMac
Our local board interpreter now advises us to use two different arms to make these two counts so this mistake doesn't happen. If we make the five second count with our right arm, we switch over to our left arm for the ten second count. Our interpreter also advises us to switch arms as we change our five second closely guarded counts, from a dribbling count to a holding count or from a holding count to a dribbling count.
How would this work in regards to chopping in the clock? Is the chop in "1"?
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  #13 (permalink)  
Old Mon Feb 12, 2007, 09:00pm
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I would chop in when it is touched and then begin the 10 count when player control begins.
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Old Mon Feb 12, 2007, 09:03pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PYRef
I would chop in when it is touched and then begin the 10 count when player control begins.
Let's say, though, that there's no contesting of the throw in and player control begins as soon as A2 touches the ball (thrown by A1). Let's also assume that I'm administering the throw-in from the right side of the basket facing upcourt. So I'm on the outside of the shooter, whistle in mouth, my right hand up to signal the clock, and I hand A1 the ball with my left hand and begin the count with my left hand. As soon as A2 touches the ball and has control (again, we're assuming for this case that it's at the same time), I chop the clock in. Then should I use the same hand to do the 10-second count or should I use my other hand?

Sorry, I'm still brushing up on my mechanics.
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Old Mon Feb 12, 2007, 09:11pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DC_Ref12
Let's say, though, that there's no contesting of the throw in and player control begins as soon as A2 touches the ball (thrown by A1). Let's also assume that I'm administering the throw-in from the right side of the basket facing upcourt. So I'm on the outside of the shooter, whistle in mouth, my right hand up to signal the clock, and I hand A1 the ball with my left hand and begin the count with my left hand. As soon as A2 touches the ball and has control (again, we're assuming for this case that it's at the same time), I chop the clock in. Then should I use the same hand to do the 10-second count or should I use my other hand?

Sorry, I'm still brushing up on my mechanics.
Personally, I do my 10-second count with the hand I chopped the clock.
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Last edited by Raymond; Mon Feb 12, 2007 at 11:04pm.
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