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  #1 (permalink)  
Old Mon May 17, 2004, 12:27am
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Unhappy

I have come to the point where I need to make a decision that I don't want to make.
Is it time for me to pack it in on the game that I love to work the most?
I broke my foot December of 2002 and tore my achilles tendon (only slightly) during a game.
My foot has hurt continuously from then on.
I can't run as well as I used to.
I cut my schedule this last season down to almost nothing, (middle school, JV, and girls varisty only)
My foot hurts, a lot.
Nothing there to do about it, just live with it.
What would you do?
Still unsure if I need to quit, take another year off, or what................

Your thoughts are appreciated
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  #2 (permalink)  
Old Mon May 17, 2004, 01:14am
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If you fear getting hurt again, maybe it's time to pack it in.

If you don't fear re-injury, but it's the physical pain that is bothering you.. have you done PT rehab and have you tried a variety of orthotics and stuck with an icing schedule a few times a day EVERY DAY for a few months? Once the season ended this year, it took about 6 weeks of icing (several times daily) before my achilles finally settled down.

Ever since I tore the left achilles 3 years ago playing basketball, my right achilles has developed tendinitis while officiating (unconsciously favoring the left one I'm sure). During the season, I use lots of ice, ibuprofen, some physical therapy and good orthotics.

The pain ranges from a 4 to a 8 (on a scale of 1 to 10), but fortunately the pain eases down to about a 2 or 3 once I get warmed up. I still move as good as always, but I sometimes ref the first couple minutes of a game while gritting my teeth until the pain starts to subside.

Those are my thoughts, but nobody on the board knows how much pain you have nor how worried you are about further injury. Only you can make that call.

Z


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Old Mon May 17, 2004, 01:23am
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With an injury like that. First ask your doctor. You might need to see a specialist to find out what your options are. I've known several runners who can't live without their orthotics. Personally, I haven't had any injury that six months of rest hasn't cured. But I haven't had the kind of injury you have. Good luck. Were behind you no matter what you decide.
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Old Mon May 17, 2004, 03:56am
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If you are young, take some time off and get proper treatment. If you are older with these problems and dont't want to take time off, you can still be involved. Be a referee trainer, they are always in demand, surely.
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Old Mon May 17, 2004, 07:47am
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Scott, I know that you're familiar with dealing with pain, so I'm wondering if that's the major issue or is it because you're having difficulty keeping up with the game?
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Old Mon May 17, 2004, 08:08am
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It is pain, unrelenting

I thank you for the thought and ideas given here.
I have been to a doctor and have his OK to work when I can.
I use the motrin and ice method a lot.
I too usually get better after a little bit of warming up but at times the sharp stabbing pain in my foot is enough to take my breath away from me.
I have gasped out loud enough for a fan to hear me.
Good orthotics have helped but whooeee, I feel like I have been shot sometimes.
One of the biggest problems for me is that when I try to turn with the fast break, I can't do it. I just can't make that turn. I can stop dead turn around and then run. My knees don't bother me unlike the DR's expectations, just the foot.
Maybe rest for a longer time is the answer.
Thanks for the thoughts.

TONY, the foot pain is the issue not the arm even though that still hurts too.

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Old Mon May 17, 2004, 08:18am
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So it sounds like it's some of both. Rest will work wonders. I would continue to treat it, even after it has improved. No need to make a decision until you're forced to, i.e. closer to next season.

Good luck!
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Old Mon May 17, 2004, 09:12am
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Re: It is pain, unrelenting

Quote:
Originally posted by scottk_61
I thank you for the thought and ideas given here.
I have been to a doctor and have his OK to work when I can.
I use the motrin and ice method a lot.
I would suggest seeing a different doctor. My podiatrist says that a lot of doctors still subscribe to the theory that some pains are just the way of the world, and you just have to grin and bear it. But he treats pain more aggressively and finds out what's wrong and makes it go away. He will even go to surgery to physically relocate a nerve fiber, if necessary. From now until the season starts is a long time. I think you could at least try to find another approach that might give you relief. Are you Scott_61 because that's how old you are? You've still got at least 10 good years left, if you can claim them. Go for it!
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Old Mon May 17, 2004, 01:02pm
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Post

As someone who had to go through something similar (my brain spur kept interfering with my ability to think), let me chime in.

OK - seriously, here's the criteria I would use, and I would wait until the last moment I could before making a decision.

1) is your physical condition causing you to not be able to give the kids the game they deserve as far as officiating is concerned

2) is there the threat of continuing damage to your body if you continue

3) do you really need the money

4) is there an alternative sport you can officiate that does not require the same type of running

5) is the amount of pain worth whatever you're getting out of officiating

6) do you have a goal of moving up the ladder - because this might prevent you from doing so which would be yet another reason to hang it up

Only you can answer these questions truthfully. Try to be objective if possible and I wish you the best.
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Old Mon May 17, 2004, 04:13pm
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Can you give some more info. what bone in your foot was Broken? Was it the fifth metatarsal? Did you also have liogament damage? You really should not have pain if the bone is healed. Maybe you need an orthopedic surgeon to check it. Bone scan, xrays??
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Old Mon May 17, 2004, 05:43pm
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If I remember right, you're not a spring chicken anymore. While you've probably got several more years (even decades) of living, you don't want to be so injured that you can't even walk just to get 2-3 more years of reffing.

If you're in pain every trip down the floor, is it really worth the risk that you may be making it worse.

Still want to give to the kids? Be an evaluator. Become a coach. There's always the need for good coaches (and they do exist )
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Old Mon May 17, 2004, 07:51pm
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Lightbulb You will be fine.

Scott,

If I were you (and I am not), I would find a second and a third opinion. You do not want to go a couple of years down the road and find out that you could have gotten the right treatment and healed properly and you wasted that time. I do not know how old you are, but I know many that are in their 60s and have had injuries over the years. Hell, Dick Bavetta is 65 I believe. I do not know your overall weight or height and how that might affect your injury, but I am sure you can comeback with the right treatment. Maybe you will not come back with the same strength or speed, but you might be able to come back.

Right now you are probably frustrated (I know I would be) and do not know what the future might hold. You have every right to feel that way. But you I would not make that decision without a Doctor's opinion and what the possible treatments and recovery might be. You might not have to take that much time off if you rest and rehab the injury.

Keep your head up. There are a lot of things that could be worse. Pray about it. At least that is what I would do before making such a big decision.

Peace
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Old Mon May 17, 2004, 10:11pm
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As someone who has dealt with chronic plantar fasciaitis for the past 3-4 years, I'll give you my opinion. If the pain is so bad that you notice it while running and it is distracting you, I would seriously examine what other options are available to you. Second and third opinions are great, but be sure that you are seeing drs that you want to see. My podiatrist is a former college athlete. That is important to me. He understands that I will not just take 6 months off from physical activity and that my recovery/PT/rehad will need to relect that.

That being said, you have to decide how much pain you can live with. I would be very leery of a dr who offers to move nerve endings and would do a lot of homework/research before I would submit to that surgery. I knew going into my foot surgery that I might never be pain free again (and I am not--I still feel every step I take with my right foot), but my pain is at a very acceptable and manageable level. I have had to curtail the number of games that I accept--in and out of season. I have to be really careful at camps that I don't overdo so I don't break down. I have to pay attention to what I do.

If you feel you have taken prudent steps and taken care of your body and your body still tells you to stop, I would stop. I want to ref for as long as I can, but I want to walk for the rest of my life and sacrificing now is not something I am willing to do at the expense of my long term health.

I hope that I didn't ramble on too much.
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Old Mon May 17, 2004, 10:58pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by stripes
That being said, you have to decide how much pain you can live with. I would be very leery of a dr who offers to move nerve endings and would do a lot of homework/research before I would submit to that surgery.
I'm the one who said my podiatrist would go as far as to move a nerve, and I want to agree with stripes here. I didn't mean you should have that surgery, I just wanted to say look around for different options and see what's available. It sounds like your doctor is playing it pretty conservatively, and a more aggressive approach might make it easier to keep reffing.
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  #15 (permalink)  
Old Wed May 19, 2004, 01:30pm
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Scott,
Seems like you've gotten some great advice. Hope it helps and hope you're able to be as involved as you want to be for as long as you choose.

For the rest of us, Scotts plea for advice is probably a good reminder for the rest of us not to take for granted our good health. We should be doing all those things we know we should be doing, ie., attention to proper weight to height proportions, proper stretching before and after activities, proper nutrition and plenty of exercise.

Another thing that many of us neglect is adequate hydration. Taking in plenty of fluids, of which the great majority should be good, old-fashioned water. Many believe most people are in a constant state of dehydration; we just don't seem to drink enough water. What is it 'they' say, "A little prevention goes a long way"? Probably very true.

I understand injuries happen despite all our best preventative measures, this does not mean we should be neglectfull; they will help prevent many others. I'm outta here, gotta go take some of my own advice.

Again, good luck Scott.
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