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  #16 (permalink)  
Old Fri Apr 27, 2001, 03:06pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by Richard Ogg
Quote:
Originally posted by Dan_ref


Richard, don't you let the lead bounce the ball to the sideline when it's at the FT line extended & below? This works very well because you don't need to switch on sideline OOB when the ball goes out on the leads line.

-Dan
Dan, we're not allowed to do that here, even though it is "by the book". The issue is that your suggestion forces the Lead all the way to the sideline to referee the inbound activity. The inbound will, be assured, go immediately (directly or indirectly) to the low block on your side. Now the Lead is way out of position to referee that action, and the Trail would have to work through the paint to the action.

So for those sideline inbounds, even below the FT line extended, we switch (and hustle!). Now that said, if the players are young enough or the action not that good, we may do as you suggested. If you know very well that the team involved is not capable of getting the ball quickly to the low block then we might bounce to the lower sideline. But, our association instructions are to switch instead.
Thanks, that's interesting to know. I find that if you
stand a good 3 or 4 feet from the sideline on the endline
and bounce the ball across that corner of the court then you
can stay in position for the quick dump to the post.
As you say it is possible to leave too much to the
trail using the "by the book" mechanic, but I like using
it myself.
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  #17 (permalink)  
Old Fri Apr 27, 2001, 03:40pm
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Yeah, but 3-4 feet from the sideline makes it tough to watch the plane violations.

Also, you are now in the middle between two "theaters" of action. There is the inbound stuff at the sideline, and the pushing/holding/elbow competition at the low post. You can't turn your head both directions at once.

Sure, it can be done, and obviously works well for many. (After all, it is the official recommendation!) If it works for you, great. I suspect it was not working for some in our area and rather than trying to get these individuals to recognize their problem and figure out a way to fix it, a group solution was provided. The only downside is the extra time for the switch. If both officials hustle, this really isn't much. (Lead blows whistle, trail realizes situation and darts across to sideline. Player finally has retrieved the ball....) Also, Lead may well stay strong side but face toward key, as if already crossed over. You can still get to the other side before a play can develop there.

For me, I like not having to be as concerned about two well-separated areas. But then I'm not as experienced as a lot of officials.
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  #18 (permalink)  
Old Fri Apr 27, 2001, 04:26pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by Dan_ref
Quote:
Originally posted by Richard Ogg
Quote:
Originally posted by Dan_ref


Richard, don't you let the lead bounce the ball to the sideline when it's at the FT line extended & below? This works very well because you don't need to switch on sideline OOB when the ball goes out on the leads line.

-Dan
Dan, we're not allowed to do that here, even though it is "by the book". The issue is that your suggestion forces the Lead all the way to the sideline to referee the inbound activity. The inbound will, be assured, go immediately (directly or indirectly) to the low block on your side. Now the Lead is way out of position to referee that action, and the Trail would have to work through the paint to the action.

So for those sideline inbounds, even below the FT line extended, we switch (and hustle!). Now that said, if the players are young enough or the action not that good, we may do as you suggested. If you know very well that the team involved is not capable of getting the ball quickly to the low block then we might bounce to the lower sideline. But, our association instructions are to switch instead.
Thanks, that's interesting to know. I find that if you
stand a good 3 or 4 feet from the sideline on the endline
and bounce the ball across that corner of the court then you
can stay in position for the quick dump to the post.
As you say it is possible to leave too much to the
trail using the "by the book" mechanic, but I like using
it myself.
Sparky,
I am surprised that CA, with their shot clock, doesn't work 3-man stuff.
Only in 3-whistle are we Leads in MI not allowed to bounce. I like the tool, but I am usually OOB on the side. It's never bit me yet.
mick
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  #19 (permalink)  
Old Fri Apr 27, 2001, 06:58pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by Richard Ogg
Yeah, but 3-4 feet from the sideline makes it tough to watch the plane violations.

Also, you are now in the middle between two "theaters" of action. There is the inbound stuff at the sideline, and the pushing/holding/elbow competition at the low post. You can't turn your head both directions at once.

...

For me, I like not having to be as concerned about two well-separated areas. But then I'm not as experienced as a lot of officials.
So, I've just gotta ask, how do you handle the case when
the ball goes OOB over the endline & near the corner?
Isn't this pretty much the same problem? (I don't mean
whether you bounce or not, this is clearly a no-bounce,
but I mean how do you as lead handle the throw-in
& prepare to get in position for the low post stuff?)
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  #20 (permalink)  
Old Sat Apr 28, 2001, 11:58pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by Dan_ref

So, I've just gotta ask, how do you handle the case when the ball goes OOB over the endline & near the corner? ... prepare to get in position for the low post stuff?
In this case you're stuck -- the Lead has to move out and take it. At least your attention is focused more in a single direction, that is the inbound area and the low block are on the same line. However, it gets worse because the player throwing the ball in cuts through blocking your view. In my opinion the situation is less than ideal, but oh well.
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