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Old Fri Jul 01, 2005, 09:06pm
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Boys HS summer league game last night using NFHS rules. I was center and after a made basket I stopped the game because a player right in front of me was limping after twisting his ankle. I went over to him and asked him if he was okay. He said yes and started jogging down the court. One of my partners came over and said he had to be replaced because I stopped the game for the injury. I forgot to ask him about it after the game but I looked it up in the rule book and my interpretation is that if I stop the game and the player is ready to play immediately (which he was) then he does not need to come out. If the coach is called on the floor he must be replaced or the team can call a time out. In this case replacing him was the right thing to since he limped around the sidelines for a few minutes and it was only a summer scrimmage, but what about an actual reagular season game?
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Old Fri Jul 01, 2005, 09:35pm
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Game management question... Guy was limping along down the floor, Did you have to blow the whistle?

(By rule he was ready to play no sub)

But why bnlow the whistle? I ask kids all the time are you ok? Do you want to go out? A lot of times they say theyre ok and we keep going with no interruption. While by rule you were correct--

Remember the more we keep the game going with out a whistle the better off we are
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Old Fri Jul 01, 2005, 10:10pm
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Kelvin,

I guess I didn't have to blow the whistle. As I think back on it I think, in this case it was okay to blow it. A basket was just scored and there was no pressing going on so at that particular time it had no bearing on game action.

However, I would assess myself as one quick to blow a whistle when I see an injured player. Based on this situation and your comments I will think hard about it and maybe think twice next time before blowing the whistle for this type of injury. In this case there was time to watch him for a few seconds more and really see if he was going to need assistance or could keep on playing. Thanks for the input.
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Old Fri Jul 01, 2005, 10:22pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by johnnyrao
Kelvin,

I guess I didn't have to blow the whistle. As I think back on it I think, in this case it was okay to blow it. A basket was just scored and there was no pressing going on so at that particular time it had no bearing on game action.

However, I would assess myself as one quick to blow a whistle when I see an injured player. Based on this situation and your comments I will think hard about it and maybe think twice next time before blowing the whistle for this type of injury. In this case there was time to watch him for a few seconds more and really see if he was going to need assistance or could keep on playing. Thanks for the input.
johnnyrao,
I very well could have blown the whistle, too.
Why? Because I was busy with the player and not officiating the action; I would want my partners to know that I was dealing with something else.
mick

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Old Fri Jul 01, 2005, 10:49pm
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johnnyrao, I would have blown the whistle to stop the game as well. IMO it is easier to stop the game for a suspected injury, rather than miss some action in your area.
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Old Sat Jul 02, 2005, 02:50am
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Quote:
Originally posted by mick
johnnyrao,
I very well could have blown the whistle, too.
Why? Because I was busy with the player and not officiating the action; I would want my partners to know that I was dealing with something else.
mick
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Old Sat Jul 02, 2005, 06:45am
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Quote:
Originally posted by Kelvin green
Game management question... Guy was limping along down the floor, Did you have to blow the whistle?

(By rule he was ready to play no sub)

But why blow the whistle? I ask kids all the time are you ok? Do you want to go out? A lot of times they say theyre ok and we keep going with no interruption. While by rule you were correct--

Remember the more we keep the game going with out a whistle the better off we are
Agree- certainly for anything above JV.

If he's just limping, it's obvious there's no serious injury involved. If he's on the offensive team, he has the option to call a TO. That will stop the play-- and if he goes off, his team won't be charged with the TO anyway. If he's on the defensive team, he's trailing a 5 on 4-albeit maybe a slow one. Either way, you've got plenty of time to ask him if he's OK.

If you know it's minor, let the player make the decision,not you.
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Old Sat Jul 02, 2005, 07:20am
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Summer league - I agree to blow the whistle.

Regular season - you may want to hold off and, if possible, ask the player while going up court, as long as you can still focus on your primary. If you're at all in doubt, though, kill the play, and take care of the suspected injury.
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Old Sat Jul 02, 2005, 08:49am
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Your partner was wrong, the player does not have to leave the game.

If you feel a player maybe injured, blow the whistle at the appropriate time. Never let "game flow" get in the way of attending to an injured player.
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Old Sat Jul 02, 2005, 09:22pm
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johnnyrao,
You have gotten many interesting replies. Whether or not to blow the whistle is always going to be a judgement call on your part. I tend to err on the side of safety - always. I'm more concerned about an injury than game flow. Also,BBR was right. Your partner was wrong.
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Old Sat Jul 02, 2005, 10:32pm
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Thanks to everyone for the insight. Lots of different ideas, all of them good ones, and all of them will help me to think it through and be prepared come next regular season.
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Old Sun Jul 03, 2005, 12:16am
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I officiate three sports, two of which could be considered contact sports... soccer and basketball. (Swimming, the worst injury is usually a cut foot on the deck or a cramp in the water) I usually wait for a fast break to finish, unless the player is obviously unconscious, bleeding obviously, or in some other major kind of injury such as an obviously broken limb. If this occurs, whistle right away. If the injured player is down in the middle of live play (players around the injured player), whistle immediately. If the player is not obviously seriously injured, and the play has moved away and is a fast break situation, I keep the injured player in my periphery, unless my partner has them, and allow the play to continue until the fast break ends, or the other team gains possession.

It has produced some interesting situations, because I am an EMT as well. Various people have various opinions on whether or not someone with that training should get involved. Not something for this thread, although in the absense of a trainer, I usually do offer to help after indicating my level of EMS training. It is rarely refused.
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