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Old Fri Mar 23, 2018, 04:33pm
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NFHS 2018-19 Rule Proposals ...

Its solid color shall be Pantone Matching System (PMS) Orand,151, Red-Orange 173, Brown 1535 or a combination of two of these colors with a solid color for each panel, effective 2019-20.
Rationale: Allowing for a combination colored ball, provides options for ball choices while maintaining the color scheme.

It shall have a deeply-pebbled, granulated like, cover with horizontally shaped panels bonded tightly to the rubber carcass.
Rationale: The additional words give manufacturers a better sense of what a deeply-pebbled cover should look like.

c. The torso color shall be light for the home team and a contrasting dark color for the visiting team.
Rationale: Jersey manufacturing has changed with the times and officials can clearly distinguish between a light and dark color. The light gray color for example, has become extremely popular for teams and it is not permitted as a home jersey. As long as there is a contrast in team colors, it should be permissible.

The torso color shall be white for the home team and a contrasting dark color for the visiting team.
NOTE 1: It is recommended that the dark torso color for the visiting team be the darker color of the school’s color scheme or black.
NOTE 2: By mutual agreement, the torso color may be white for the visiting team and may be a contrasting dark color for the home team. If there is a dispute over jersey color, the home team shall wear white.
Rationale: In many cases, teams are traveling for multiple day events, and have concerns about laundry while traveling, etc. In addition, this would allow the home team to wear a dark jersey to commemorate a former team uniform or another special occasion. As long as one team wears white, the ability to easily officiate and distinguish between the teams is not impacted.

The sleeves/tights, compression shorts shall be black or white, and the same color sleeves/tights shall be worn by teammates.
Rationale: It makes the rule easier to understand by officials, coaches & players. We are spending more time discussing what is legal & illegal with uniforms & apparel than we are spending with hand-checking, post-play, etc. It will also put more responsibility on coaches to make sure their players are dressed legally.

All sleeves/tights, compression shorts shall be black or white and must be the same color as any headband or wristband worn.
Rationale: It makes the rule easier to understand by officials, coaches & players. We are spending more time discussing what is legal & illegal with uniforms & apparel than we are spending with hand-checking, post-play, etc. It will also put more responsibility on coaches to make sure their players are dressed legally.

Headbands and wristbands shall be white or black. They must be the same color as any sleeve/tights worn. See 3-6 for logo requirements.
Rationale: It makes the rule easier to understand by officials, coaches & players. We are spending more time discussing what is legal & illegal with uniforms & apparel than we are spending with hand-checking, post-play, etc. It will also put more responsibility on coaches to make sure their players are dressed legally.

Basket interference occurs when a player: Unintentionally slapping or striking the backboard or causing the ring to vibrate while a try or tap is in flight or is touching the backboard or is in the basket or in the cylinder above the basket.
Rationale: Basket interference should be expanded to include the unintentional slapping or striking of the backboard causing the ring to vibrate. Currently a slap of the backboard has no penalty other than the assessment of a technical foul when the act is deemed intentional. Quite often the slapping of the backboard occurs unintentionally in legitimate attempts to block a shot, which then causes the basket ring to vibrate or move in a way that may cause the ball "fall" off the ring. Having this addition to the basket interference rule would afford officials an alternative to the determination of an intentional act (resulting in a technical foul) or unintentional (resulting in an awarded basket) in situations when the backboard is slapped.

ART. 1 Bonus free throws are those awarded for a common foul (except a player-control or team-control foul) as follows:
a. The bonus is two free throws that are awarded for each personal foul, and each subsequent foul, beginning with the sixth foul in each quarter.
b. The team foul total should be zeroed out at the end of each quarter, with the exception of any overtime period. The overtime period is considered an extension of the fourth quarter.
Rationale: This rule change proposal is designed to allow for a better flow of the game, and spend less time at the free throw line. During free throw administration the potential for numerous negative acts to occur, with up to seven players is a confined area. This proposal also provides for only one number of free throws awarded regardless if the foul was committed during a try or after reaching the bonus foul count (two free throws for all). This change has been implemented in the NCAA women's game for the past two years, and even with their bonus going into effect on the 5th foul, only 22% of the time do teams reach the bonus. This will reduce the amount of time it takes to complete a game, especially critical on a school night that proceeds a school day.

Goaltending occurs when a defensive player touches the ball during a field-goal try or tap while the ball is in its downward flight entirely above the basket ring level, has the possibility of entering the basket in flight and is not touching the basket cylinder or a defensive player touches the ball outside the cylinder during a free-throw attempt.
Rationale: Realistically why would an offensive player goaltend a try at his/her basket? By making this a defensive violation only, the rule is clearer and makes enforcement easier for officials. If the shooting team cannot commit this violation, the officials do not have to determine whether a ball thrown toward the basket and meets the requirements for a goaltending violation is a try or a pass. By removing the offensive team from this violation, players too do not have to try to determine whether a ball in flight is a try or a pass and teams can have more potential for scoring plays at the basket.
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Last edited by BillyMac; Fri Mar 23, 2018 at 10:49pm.
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Old Fri Mar 23, 2018, 04:33pm
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Continued ...

Art. 6 A secondary defender as defined in Rule 4-41(added rule in definitions) cannot establish initial legal guarding position in the restricted area for the purpose of drawing a player control foul/charge when defending a player who is in control of the ball (i.e., dribbling or shooting) or who has released the ball for a pass or try. When illegal contact occurs within this Restricted Area (New 4-38), such contact shall be called a blocking foul, unless the contact is a flagrant foul.
a. When illegal contact occurs by the offensive player leading with a foot or unnatural, extended knee, or warding off with the arm, such contact shall be called a player-control foul.
b. When a player in control of the ball stops continuous movement toward the basket and then initiates illegal contact with a secondary defender in the restricted area, this is a player control foul.
c. This restriction shall not apply to a secondary defender who establishes legal guardian position in the Restricted Area Arc and jumps straight up with arms in legal verticality position and attempts to block a shot.
Illegal contact made by a grounded secondary defender in the restricted-area shall constitute a blocking foul.
The restricted area is defined as the area bounded by the outer edge of the restricted-area arc, which has a 4-foot radius measured from the center of the basket to the inside of the arc line and extending to the face of the backboard. A secondary defender is considered to be in the restricted area when any part of either foot is in or above this area.
Secondary Defender
Art. 1. A secondary defender is a teammate who has helped a primary defender after that player has been beaten by an opponent because he failed to establish or maintain a guarding position. A defensive player is beaten when the offensive player's head and shoulders get past the defender.
Art. 2. A secondary defender is a teammate who double teams a low post player.
Art. 3. After an offensive rebound, there are no secondary defenders when the rebounder makes an immediate move to the basket.
Art. 4. In an outnumbering fast-break situation, any defensive player(s) initially shall be a secondary defender. This designation as a secondary defender shall not prevent the defender from establishing legal guarding position on an offensive player and defending that player all the way to the basket including in the Restricted Area Arc.
Would remain the same indicating that players shall adhere to the contact rules.
Rationale: We are proposing a restricted-area arc for player safety reasons. Players who attempt to draw player control/charging fouls under the basket constitutes a significant safety issue that can be avoided by not allowing secondary defenders to set up defensively in the restricted area. This rule will only come into play with a grounded secondary defender. All other plays are covered by other rules (verticality, guarding, contact, etc.).

Grants and signals a player's oral or visual request for a time-out in a. thru c. or a head coach's oral or visual request in b. and c.:
a. The ball is at the disposal or in control of a player of his/her team.
b. The ball is dead, unless replacement of a disqualified, or injured player(s) or a player directed to leave the game is pending, and a substitute(s) is available and required.
NEW c. When the ball is at the disposal of a player of the team entitled to a throw-in before the ball has been released on the pass directly onto the court.
Rationale: Allowing the head coach to request a time-out during a live ball creates problems for officials, especially in a two-person crew, as they frequently have to divert their attention and eyes from the play to the bench area to determine who is requesting the time-out which may result in missing critical action on the court. By allowing the head coach to request a time-out only when the ball is dead or during a throw-in still permits him/her to directly request a time-out in those limited situations where officials can be more aware of the potential for a time-out request coming from the bench and not have to divert their attention from play on the floor.

...Recognizes each successful field goal in the last 59.9 seconds of the fourth quarter or any extra period.
Rationale: The proposed rule change would allow for the clock to stop in the final minute of a contest after any made basket, matching what other levels of play follow domestically. We feel this change would be beneficial to the high school game for a handful of reasons, including:
* Removing situations of deliberate Delay-of-Game offenses by either team (7-5-1/10-2-1b) in an effort to conserve/consume time in end-of-game situations
* Removes the somewhat ambiguous issue of what an appropriate amount of time is to "gather" and resume play by a team in the lead in the final minute
* Removes the situation wherein coaches encourage Delay-of-Game offenses by athletes to conserve/consume time
* Removes the situation where coaches are calling a "sixth" timeout to take a technical in an attempt to extend the game
* Coaches are more able to utilize their timeouts throughout the contest versus feeling compelled to conserve them for end-of-game stoppages of the clock
Ultimately, we feel that this rule improves our end-of-game situations for officials, coaches and fans alike; is able to be officiated/enforced by high school officials; is easily understandable for scorers and timers; and creates a more balanced situation between offensive and defensive squads, regardless of score.
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Old Fri Mar 23, 2018, 04:34pm
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Continued ...

The opportunity to make an alternating-possession throw-in is lost if the throw-in team commits a throw-in violation. If either team fouls during an alternating-possession throw-in, it does not cause the throw-in team to lose the possession arrow. If the defensive team commits a violation during the throw-in, or the throw-in team commits a violation other than a throw-in violation, the possession arrow is not switched.
Rationale: By limiting the loss of the possession arrow to a throw-in violation committed by the throw-in team, there is consistency of penalty and ensuring the loss of the arrow is associated with the violation of a throw-in provision not another non-related violation. The loss of the arrow associated with a violation should be limited to those violations in rule 9-2-1 thru 9.

Exemption: A pass or any other loose ball in the front court that is deflected by a defensive player, which causes the ball to go into the backcourt, may be recovered by either team EVEN IF the offense was last to touch the ball, without player control, before it went into the backcourt.
Rationale: The exemption to this rule would alleviate the official's duty to determine if a ball was simultaneously touched, by the defense and then offense (in a backcourt violation situation), and helps them to continue to officiate the defense.
The definition added would clear up confusion as to what a "loose ball" is and what it is not.
Other Rules Affected:
Loose ball: When a player is holding, dribbling, or passing a ball, a loose ball occurs if the player a) fumbles the ball, b) has an interrupted dribble, c) loses player control when a defender bats or deflects the ball from their possession, d) has a pass deflected, or e) releases the ball during a try.

A player shall not be the first to touch the ball after it has been in team control in the frontcourt, if he/she or a teammate last touched or was touched by the ball in the frontcourt before it went to the backcourt. A pass in the frontcourt that is deflected by a defensive player so that the ball goes into the Backcourt may be recovered by either team.
Rationale: To correct a likely prior omission and ensure that a team is not unfairly disadvantaged. This also makes the play situation on the deflected pass consistent with other codes with very similar team control and backcourt rules.

Allow dunking during the pre-game warmup period.
Rationale: Is pre-game considered a "dead ball" period? My rationale addresses a few areas.
1. An attempt to get more people attending high school basketball. Attendance is down across the country and this rule change may get more people interested in attending a game, if for no other reason than to watch the kids attempt to dunk in pre-game.
2. It may be the only athletic act that is allowed during a game, but during pre-game warmups.
3. There could be, and I emphasize could be, a potential liability suit if a player is injured while attempting a dunk during a game, yet was not allowed to practice/warmup the act of dunking during warmups.
4. There is less risk of injury dunking in warmups, then during a game while being contended by an opponent.

The head coach shall not permit a team member to participate while wearing an illegal uniform or illegal apparel.
Penalty – Direct technical foul charged to the head coach. Rule 10, Section 6, Article 4: The head coach shall not permit a team member to participate while wearing an illegal uniform (see 3-4) or illegal apparel.
Rationale: It makes the rule easier to understand by officials, coaches & players. We are spending more time discussing what is legal & illegal with uniforms & apparel than we are spending with hand checking, post-play, etc.
It will also put more responsibility on coaches to make sure their players are dressed legally.
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Old Fri Mar 23, 2018, 04:54pm
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How do you get this info so early?
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Old Fri Mar 23, 2018, 05:08pm
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Know A Guy Who Knows A Guy ...

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Originally Posted by sdoebler View Post
How do you get this info so early?
https://forum.officiating.com/basket...ml#post1019172

I've worked with the NFHS rules committee before, and have "networked" up through the ranks of my local IAABO board interpreter, my Connecticut state IAABO board interpreter, my Connecticut state high school interscholastic sports governing body (Connecticut officials have their own "branch" in this organization), IAABO International (submitting several articles to their Sportorials magazine), up to the NFHS rules committee.

This isn't my first rodeo.

I'm just a journeyman official, with no title within any organization (in the past I have served on my local IAABO board's rules training committee, and mechanics training committee), but (with much thanks to the Forum) I've become a "go-to rules and mechanics guy".
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"For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life." (John 3:16)

“I was in prison and you came to visit me.” (Matthew 25:36)

Last edited by BillyMac; Fri Mar 23, 2018 at 05:43pm.
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Old Fri Mar 23, 2018, 06:19pm
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High School Shot Clock Proposal

Rule 1-21 (NFHS, proposed) SHOT CLOCK
Art. 1. A shot clock is one of the two official visible timepieces that displays the amount of time the team in control has to release a try for goal that hits the rim or flange.
Art. 2. Two visible shot clocks shall be required. It is recommended that they be recessed and mounted on the backboard supports behind each backboard, but any configuration in which both shot clocks are visible to both teams, coaches, officials, and spectators is acceptable. An electronic projection of shot-clock software or the output of a mobile shot-clock application meets the requirements for a visible shot clock.
Art.3. An alternate timing device shall be available if a visible shot clock malfunctions.
Art. 4. If a shot clock contains LED lights around it, those lights shall only be activated for a shot clock violation.

Rationale: Explanation of how the shot clock works and how it is to be set up.

Rule 2-14 (NFHS, proposed)DUTIES OF THE SHOT CLOCK OPERATOR
The shot clock operator shall:
Art. 1. Use a 30-second shot clock.
Art. 2. Use the shot clock for the entire game, including extra periods, unless less time remains on the game clock than on the shot clock. In that case, the shot clock shall be turned off.
Art. 3. Control a separate timing device (cf. 1-21) with a horn that preferably has a different sound from the game clock horn.
Art. 4. Have an alternate timing device.
Art. 5. Start the clock when:
a. an inbounds player legally touches a throw-in after it has been released
b. a team gains initial control after a jump ball or unsuccessful try for goal
c. there is a change in team control.
Art. 6. Stop and reset to 30 seconds if:
a. team control changes
b. a shot (try or tap for goal) hits the rim or flange AND either team gains control
c.a single personal or technical foul happens
d. a flagrant foul happens
e. an inadvertent whistle sounds without team control.
f. or a violation happens.
EXCEPTION: Out-of-bounds and kicked or fisted balls.
g. an alternating possession situation happens with no team control (e.g. a shot lodges between the rim and backboard).
Art. 7. Stop and reset to 15 seconds if a kicked or fisted ball happens.
Art. 8. Stop the shot clock, but not reset it, for all other situations.
Art. 9. Sound the shot clock horn when the shot clock period expires (The shot clock shows 0 seconds remaining). The shot clock horn does not stop play unless the game officials recognize it.
Art. 10. Turn off the shot clock if there is a reset situation with less time remaining on the game clock than a shot clock period.
Art. 11. Keep the shot clock running if the offense recovers a loose ball or shoots at the wrong basket.
Art. 12. Allow the game officials to make the final decision of whether a player scored before the shot clock expired or whether a shot touched the rim or flange.

Rationale: This is guidance to the shot-clock operator on proper game procedure.

Rule 5-8
Art. 1. Time-out occurs, and the game clock and shot clock, if running shall be stopped when an official signals:
a. A foul.

b. A held ball.

c. A violation.

d. A time-out.

ART. 2

Stops play:

a. Because of an injury as in 3-3-6, 3-3-7.

b. To confer with the scorer or timer.

c. Because of unusual delay in getting a dead ball live.

d. For any other situations or any emergency.

NOTE: When a player is injured as in Art. 2(a), the official may suspend play after the ball is dead or is in control of the injured player’s team or when the opponents complete a play. A play is completed when a team loses control (including throwing for goal) or withholds the ball from play by ceasing to attempt to score or advance the ball to a scoring position. When necessary to protect an injured player, the official may immediately stop play.

ART. 3

Grants a player's/head coach's oral or visual request for a time-out, such request being granted only when:

a. The ball is at the disposal or in control of a player of his/her team.

b. The ball is dead, unless replacement of a disqualified, or injured player(s), or a player directed to leave the game is pending, and a substitute(s) is available and required.

ART. 4

Responds to the scorer's signal to grant a coach's request that a correctable error, as in 2-10, or a timing, scoring or alternating-possession mistake be prevented or rectified. The appeal to the official shall be presented at the scorer's table where a coach of each team may be present.

Rationale: Clarifies that the shot clock shall not run while the game clock is stopped.

Rule 5-9
ART. 1

After time has been out, the clock shall be started when the official signals the clock to start. If the official neglects to signal, the timer is authorized to start the clock as per rule, unless an official specifically signals continued time-out.

ART. 2

If play is started or resumed by a jump ball, the game clock shall be started when the tossed ball is legally touched. The shot clock shall start upon a team gaining initial control following the jump ball.

ART. 3

If a free throw is not successful and the ball is to remain live, the clock shall be started when the ball touches or is touched by a player on the court.The shot clock shall start when a team gains initial control of the ball following the unsuccessful free throw.

ART. 4

If play is resumed by a throw-in, the game and shot clock shall be started when the ball touches, or is legally touched by, a player on the court after it is released by the thrower.

ART. 5. The shot clock shall start when a team gains control of the ball following an unsuccessful try or tap for goal .

ART. 6. The shot clock shall start on a change of team control.

Rationale: Clarifies when the game clock shall start, and when the shot clock shall start.

Rule 9-8

A player shall not be, nor may his/her team be, in continuous control of the ball which is in his/her backcourt for 10 seconds. The 10-second count shall begin when a player legally touches a ball in that team's backcourt, except on a rebound or jump ball. In that case, the 10-second count shall start on player control. The 10-second count shall NOT reset if the shot clock does not reset.


PENALTY: The ball is dead when the violation occurs and is awarded to the opponents for a throw-in from the designated out-of-bounds spot nearest the violation.

Rationale: Clarifies how the addition of a shot clock will modify the administration of the 10-second count. A 30-second shot clock eases the task of officials in administering 10-second violations, by allowing them the freedom to see a wider area of the court while only having to glance at the shot clock. This will improve transition coverage, by not requiring the trail official to focus on the ballhandler and on the 10-second count simultaneously.

Rule 9-9 [NEW] Shot Clock

Art. 1. A shot-clock period is the period of time beginning when the ball is legally touched on a throw-in or when team control is established or re-established after loss of team control and the shot clock is properly started. The shot-clock period ends when the shot clock is properly started for the next shot-clock period.
Art. 2. A shot-clock try for field goal is defined as the ball having left the shooter’s hand(s) before the sounding of the shot-clock horn and then striking the ring or flange, or entering the basket.
Art. 3. The team in control must attempt a try for a field goal within 30 seconds after the shot-clock period begins.
Art. 4. It is a violation when a try for field goal does not leave the shooter’s hand before the expiration of the allotted shot-clock time (as indicated by the
sounding of the shot-clock horn) or when it does leave the shooter’s hand before the expiration of the allotted shot-clock time and the try does not subsequently strike the ring or flange or enter the basket.

Rationale: Risk minimization and improvement in game administration. The number of end-of-game fouls will be reduced, because fouls become disadvantageous as a strategy. This is because possessions are limited in duration, and fouling grants the team that was fouled a new possession. In addition, a 30-second shot clock eases the task of officials in administering 10-second violations, by allowing them the freedom to see a wider area of the court while only having to glance at the shot clock. This will improve transition coverage, by not requiring the trail official to focus on the ballhandler and on the 10-second count simultaneously.

Note: Any new rules are indicated by [NEW] or (proposed). Any changes to existing rules are indicated in bold.

I chose the women's college shot clock, because that would be the simplest kind for high school table personnel to administer (all resets are 30, except for a kicked/fisted ball). I included rationales for all the proposed rules relating to the shot clock, including the biggest rationale section for the shot-clock violation rule itself. Feel free to add to this proposal if you feel that I omitted anything, or did anything incorrectly.

Last edited by ilyazhito; Fri Mar 23, 2018 at 06:21pm.
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Old Fri Mar 23, 2018, 06:32pm
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Really hope we dont go to the RA thing.
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Old Fri Mar 23, 2018, 07:01pm
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The restricted area should make it easier for officials to determine block/charge situations, because it prevents the defense from benefiting from a cheap call under the basket. If a defender is allowed to set up legal guarding position under the basket after an offensive player beats his original defender, he can draw contact to prevent a score. The restricted area will prevent this from happening, unless the offensive player clearly uses an unnatural action to contact the defender or gain space. This is why I would agree more with BillyMac on a restricted area.
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Old Fri Mar 23, 2018, 07:22pm
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It has nothing to do with making b/c calls easier. It makes it easier for people to duck away from calling a charge.

BTW, Billy didnt say anything about the RA, the NFHS did. That is how its presented in the proposals.
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Old Fri Mar 23, 2018, 07:25pm
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Originally Posted by SNIPERBBB View Post
Billy didn't say anything about the RA, the NFHS did. That is how its presented in the proposals.
Thank you. I haven't had time to digest these and form an opinion.
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Old Fri Mar 23, 2018, 09:55pm
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Looked at what Billy posted and thought, “Well shit. Why even bother having a separate rule set from NCAA anymore? Might as well adopt it wholesale.” Or at least some kind of mesh between NCAAM and NCAAW rules.

I know not all of these will get adopted this year. Heck, if recent history is any indicator, it’s possible none of them will be (except for uniform rules, because if the committee agrees on nothing else, it justifies its annual travel expenses by tinkering with Rule 3). I find it interesting that all these suggesters seem hell bent on watching the same rules in their local gyms as the ones they see on TV.


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Old Fri Mar 23, 2018, 10:56pm
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And Children Of All Ages ...

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Originally Posted by crosscountry55 View Post
I know not all of these will get adopted this year. Heck, if recent history is any indicator, it’s possible none of them will be (except for uniform rules) ...
The first two (two-colored ball, and pebbled surface) were suggested by Theresia Wynns, NFHS Rules Editor.

Like the old ABA (remember Julius Erving of the New York Nets), the Harlem Globetrotters, and the modern WNBA, it looks like we soon won't using a boring, single color, brown basketball anymore. It will be just like the circus. Halftime will feature The Flying Wallendas.

James Naismith will be rolling over in his grave.
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Last edited by BillyMac; Fri Mar 23, 2018 at 11:01pm.
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Old Sat Mar 24, 2018, 07:07am
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Rhetorical Question

Does the game really need all this constant tinkering?
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Old Sat Mar 24, 2018, 07:46am
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Evolution ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by LRZ View Post
Does the game really need all this constant tinkering?
From my upcoming magazine article (first draft, several more paragraphs(George Mikan, Bob Kurland, Bill Russell, Wilt Chamberlain, Lew Alcindor (Kareem Abdul Jabbar), Trent Tucker, Patrick Ewing, Karl Malone, Hakeem Olajuwon, Allen Iverson, and Skylar Diggins.)):

On January 15, 1892, James Naismith published his rules for the game of basketball, the game that he invented. Basketball games played under these original thirteen rules were quite different from the games played today. Throughout the history of the game of basketball certain players have held enormous physical advantages that completely changed the way the game was played on both offense, and defense. These players were so dominant, that they caused many rule changes, rule changes that were supposed to reduce the dominance of these gifted players to make their style of play a bit fairer to other players. Most of these rule changes were originally instituted in NBA, or NCAA games, but these changes eventually trickled down to NFHS rules.

Leroy Edwards (Kentucky 1934-1935, NBL 1935-1949), a six foot, five inch, Kentucky All-American center, a prolific scorer in the days of low scoring games, is generally recognized as the player responsible for the implementation of the three second rule. Enacted in 1936, the rule was originally designed to limit rough play near the basket. The three second rule states that an offensive player cannot remain in an opponent’s free throw lane area for more than three consecutive seconds while his team has the ball in the frontcourt. A game central to this rule's introduction was that between coach Adolph Rupp’s University of Kentucky, and New York University, held in Madison Square Garden, on January 5, 1935, a game that was especially rough. While the three second rule was originally adopted to reduce roughness between big men in the free throw lane area, it is now used to prevent a tall offensive player from gaining an advantage by waiting close to the basket.

Ralph Sampson’s (Virginia 1979-1983, NBA 1983-1995) controversial basket against Brigham Young in the 1981 NCAA tournament prompted an NCAA rule change. The seven foot, four inch, Virginia All-American center dunked the ball with his free hand braced against the backboard. The basket led to a five point swing for Virginia, which capitalized on a technical foul against Brigham Young's Danny Ainge, who thought Sampson's play was illegal. Actually Sampson did nothing wrong, since, at the time, there was no rule making this an illegal play. Since 1983, NFHS rules now state that it is illegal for player to place a hand on the backboard, or the ring, to gain an advantage.

Darryl Dawkins (NBA 1975-2000), the Philadelphia 76ers six foot, eleven inch, 251 pound center, in a game against the Kansas City Kings at Municipal Auditorium on November 13, 1979, dunked and broke the backboard, sending the King’s Bill Robinzine ducking. Three weeks later he did it again, this time at home against the San Antonio Spurs at the Spectrum. Thus, Dawkins became famous for his dunks shattering backboards, and is credited for being the player to cause the NBA to introduce breakaway rims. Breakaway rims are now an essential element of the game of basketball. A broken backboard, or distorted rim, could delay a game for hours. In 1981, the NFHS adopted specifications for breakaway rims.

Shaquille O'Neal (LSU 1989-1992, NBA 1992-2011) a seven foot, one inch, 325 pound center, was one of the heaviest players ever to play in the NBA. O'Neal dunked with so much power that he broke the steel supports holding backboards during games against the New Jersey Nets, and the Phoenix Suns during the 1992–93 NBA season. This prompting the NBA to increase the strength and stability of the backboard supports, and change the stanchion design, for the following 1993–94 season.
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Last edited by BillyMac; Sat Mar 24, 2018 at 07:51am.
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Old Sat Mar 24, 2018, 11:09am
Courageous When Prudent
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Hampton Roads, VA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SNIPERBBB View Post
It has nothing to do with making b/c calls easier. It makes it easier for people to duck away from calling a charge.

BTW, Billy didnt say anything about the RA, the NFHS did. That is how its presented in the proposals.
The restricted area was implemented for safety reasons and to improve snoring, not so officials can have an excuse not to call a charge. College coaches decided they didn't want defensive players drawing charges underneath the basket. It has everything to do with what coaches want.

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