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  #1 (permalink)  
Old Mon Apr 18, 2005, 11:11am
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Plate shoes from a different angle (pun intended).

This past weekend I called 13 ball games (Fri 2, Sat 4, Sun 7). Got hit 5 times on the right foot on the inside of the arch (half-way between the ankle and the heel). From what I can tell, there are no plate shoes that provide protection there. I am thinking about creating a custom protective device, unless anyone has suggestions for an alternative solution.
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Old Mon Apr 18, 2005, 12:12pm
JEL JEL is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by tcannizzo
Plate shoes from a different angle (pun intended).

This past weekend I called 13 ball games (Fri 2, Sat 4, Sun 7). Got hit 5 times on the right foot on the inside of the arch (half-way between the ankle and the heel). From what I can tell, there are no plate shoes that provide protection there. I am thinking about creating a custom protective device, unless anyone has suggestions for an alternative solution.
Alternative solution;

Point the toes of the right foot towards the pitcher, not at a 90 deg angle.
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  #3 (permalink)  
Old Mon Apr 18, 2005, 12:30pm
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Hey tc, it would be hard to design a shoe with a solid arch. As you shift your wieght around in your shoes, your arch constantly adjusts it's shape. Just a heads up from someone with a tiny bit of shoe design knowledge.
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Old Mon Apr 18, 2005, 02:32pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by JEL
Quote:
Originally posted by tcannizzo
Plate shoes from a different angle (pun intended).

This past weekend I called 13 ball games (Fri 2, Sat 4, Sun 7). Got hit 5 times on the right foot on the inside of the arch (half-way between the ankle and the heel). From what I can tell, there are no plate shoes that provide protection there. I am thinking about creating a custom protective device, unless anyone has suggestions for an alternative solution.
Alternative solution;

Point the toes of the right foot towards the pitcher, not at a 90 deg angle.
That advice would help protect the foot, but it is contrary to the stance preached by the ASA NUS, and what is taught in this area. To be most effective in working the slot, the closer you get to the catcher, the less the catcher can block your visibility, enabling the best and most consistent strike zone. Getting close to the catcher in the slot requires you to turn out the foot behind the catcher (at least a 45 degree angle), so that your knee turns out, instead of bumping the catcher when you drop to your set position at the top of the zone.

As a newer and learning umpire, I would hate to see Tony lose part of the zone because he had to back up, because he turned his foot. This foot is directly behind the catcher; half decent or better catchers will certainly stop the ball in the 5 hole. Sometimes, you just get a run of bad luck.
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Old Mon Apr 18, 2005, 02:40pm
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Where are you getting hit?

My leg protectors come down on the sides lower than the top of the shoe - they protect the ankle area down to the shoe itself. I have very little that is exposed.

True, the side of the foot is only protected by shoe leather... is that your concern?
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Old Mon Apr 18, 2005, 03:10pm
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I think its because of the plate shoe. Whenever I wear them I always get hit on the ankle - a good shot that hurts for like two weeks. If I dont wear them, Like i usually dont wear them on 12U - I dont get hit. The softball Gods hate that shoe.

I'm just sayin...
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  #7 (permalink)  
Old Mon Apr 18, 2005, 03:26pm
JEL JEL is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by AtlUmpSteve
Quote:
Originally posted by JEL
Quote:
Originally posted by tcannizzo
Plate shoes from a different angle (pun intended).

This past weekend I called 13 ball games (Fri 2, Sat 4, Sun 7). Got hit 5 times on the right foot on the inside of the arch (half-way between the ankle and the heel). From what I can tell, there are no plate shoes that provide protection there. I am thinking about creating a custom protective device, unless anyone has suggestions for an alternative solution.
Alternative solution;

Point the toes of the right foot towards the pitcher, not at a 90 deg angle.
That advice would help protect the foot, but it is contrary to the stance preached by the ASA NUS, and what is taught in this area. To be most effective in working the slot, the closer you get to the catcher, the less the catcher can block your visibility, enabling the best and most consistent strike zone. Getting close to the catcher in the slot requires you to turn out the foot behind the catcher (at least a 45 degree angle), so that your knee turns out, instead of bumping the catcher when you drop to your set position at the top of the zone.

As a newer and learning umpire, I would hate to see Tony lose part of the zone because he had to back up, because he turned his foot. This foot is directly behind the catcher; half decent or better catchers will certainly stop the ball in the 5 hole. Sometimes, you just get a run of bad luck.
Steve,

That IS what was taught at the state ASA clinic this year. It was pointed out to me by Henry and Kinard. It seems that my "heel to toe" is more of a "heel to heel" with the right foot parallel, or at the 45 deg angle to the pitching rubber instead of pointed straight at it. I have tried since then to do more of a heel to toe and spread my stance out a bit more, (not as far as Jim Craig, I get stuck) and have eliminated some problems such as sore knees, and it has increased my visibility of the plate. I have also found that moves me back a bit further from the catcher, but it has opened my plate view as well as my view of the catchers actions. I don't seem to get in the way quite as much. I think this is similar to the "Gerry Davis stance" they talk about on the little ball board, however I am still close enough to the catcher to be able to extend my arm and just touch her. I think the Davis stance puts you further back.

Either way, I have never been hit in the right foot as I recall. I have been hit on the left foot, and about everywhere else though. You watch, tonight I will take everything off the right instep!
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  #8 (permalink)  
Old Mon Apr 18, 2005, 03:41pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by Dakota
Where are you getting hit?

My leg protectors come down on the sides lower than the top of the shoe - they protect the ankle area down to the shoe itself. I have very little that is exposed.

True, the side of the foot is only protected by shoe leather... is that your concern?

Right here:



My shin guards just basically protect the ankle.
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  #9 (permalink)  
Old Mon Apr 18, 2005, 08:20pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by AtlUmpSteve
Quote:
Originally posted by JEL
Quote:
Originally posted by tcannizzo
Plate shoes from a different angle (pun intended).

This past weekend I called 13 ball games (Fri 2, Sat 4, Sun 7). Got hit 5 times on the right foot on the inside of the arch (half-way between the ankle and the heel). From what I can tell, there are no plate shoes that provide protection there. I am thinking about creating a custom protective device, unless anyone has suggestions for an alternative solution.
Alternative solution;

Point the toes of the right foot towards the pitcher, not at a 90 deg angle.
That advice would help protect the foot, but it is contrary to the stance preached by the ASA NUS, and what is taught in this area. To be most effective in working the slot, the closer you get to the catcher, the less the catcher can block your visibility, enabling the best and most consistent strike zone. Getting close to the catcher in the slot requires you to turn out the foot behind the catcher (at least a 45 degree angle), so that your knee turns out, instead of bumping the catcher when you drop to your set position at the top of the zone.

As a newer and learning umpire, I would hate to see Tony lose part of the zone because he had to back up, because he turned his foot. This foot is directly behind the catcher; half decent or better catchers will certainly stop the ball in the 5 hole. Sometimes, you just get a run of bad luck.
I dont' know which NUS member told you to point your foot like that but it wasn't done at the Advanced school or at any National Clinic I have attended in the last few years.

Maybe you "perceived" something that wasn't said.
What you descibe with the foot is non-standard and definately a good way to get whacked.
I get as close as anyone and at 6'5" my knee sticks out a bit but I don't interfere with the catchers.
Sounds to me like you are not using the proper position at all.
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  #10 (permalink)  
Old Mon Apr 18, 2005, 08:40pm
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Im TALL, so I can get away with this..right foot in line with the middle of the catchers back, slightly turned, wide stance right in the slot. havent been hit in the right foot yet...good view of the plate
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Old Mon Apr 18, 2005, 09:28pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by scottk_61

I dont' know which NUS member told you to point your foot like that but it wasn't done at the Advanced school or at any National Clinic I have attended in the last few years.

Maybe you "perceived" something that wasn't said.
What you descibe with the foot is non-standard and definately a good way to get whacked.
I get as close as anyone and at 6'5" my knee sticks out a bit but I don't interfere with the catchers.
Sounds to me like you are not using the proper position at all.
The latest I have seen, was to assume your position in the slot and turn you feet slightly so that your body is turned toward the outside corner of the plate. It is suggested that you turn the head toward the pitcher and the natural motion will be for the head to automatically square up with the shoulders as the ball is followed to the catcher's glove.
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Old Tue Apr 19, 2005, 02:25am
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what mike said.
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Old Tue Apr 19, 2005, 07:44am
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Quote:
Originally posted by azbigdawg
what mike said.
This is also what AtlUmpSteve and others have said. I was at the NUS with Jim Craig giving the instruction on plate mechanics. For those who know Jim, he is a fairly direct guy. If you perceived something that he said as wrong, you would be corrected. The position is correct.

I did have a run of bad luck with the catchers who were in the younger age groups that did not match up well with their battery partners.
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Old Tue Apr 19, 2005, 09:23am
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Quote:
Originally posted by IRISHMAFIA
Quote:
Originally posted by scottk_61

I dont' know which NUS member told you to point your foot like that but it wasn't done at the Advanced school or at any National Clinic I have attended in the last few years.

Maybe you "perceived" something that wasn't said.
What you descibe with the foot is non-standard and definately a good way to get whacked.
I get as close as anyone and at 6'5" my knee sticks out a bit but I don't interfere with the catchers.
Sounds to me like you are not using the proper position at all.
The latest I have seen, was to assume your position in the slot and turn you feet slightly so that your body is turned toward the outside corner of the plate. It is suggested that you turn the head toward the pitcher and the natural motion will be for the head to automatically square up with the shoulders as the ball is followed to the catcher's glove.
I agree with that part Mike, but there was emphasis on getting your foot turned so that your toe was toward the pitcher and not turned so as to get whaced on the ankle.

I find the heel toe configuration to naturally turn your foot in the correct position as you square your shoulders to the pitcher.

Same thing was taught at the ISF school
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