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Old Thu Jan 16, 2003, 03:38pm
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OK, so my friend and I thought that after years and years of watching our daughters play and being the designated scorekeepers, that we would try officiating. So we've been to three meetings now, have been schmoozing with the refs at all the games, and lo and behold, all of a sudden we're on the schedule for THIS weekend! We're both scared to death! We're doing 3 games each, 3-5th graders.

I've read all the books, taken the test and passed (higher than most of our seasoned refs!) but have had no training.

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated (other than a shot of whiskey!)!!

Kris
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Old Thu Jan 16, 2003, 03:47pm
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dealing with parents

The only thing worse at a youth game than a 5th grade parent yelling from the stands is a 4th grade parent....

and the only thing even worse than the 4th grade parent yelling is a 3rd grade parent......

you get the picture....those vultures will be licking their chops at the fresh meat......

OK, OK.....let them play would be my best advise. Just about every other trip down the court, something could be called (probably every trip in a 3rd grade game)....if you don't want to have 4 hour games, let them play!

Good luck
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Old Thu Jan 16, 2003, 04:10pm
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Re: dealing with parents

Hehehe I get you drift, and that was the plan actually. And I wasn't going to let any of them know that I'm "fresh meat". Although, some of them may know me because the games are at the high school that my oldest daughter plays for. Yikes!
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Old Thu Jan 16, 2003, 04:14pm
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Best saftey mechanism is to smile a lot and enjoy the experience.

Take a moment and yell out friendly to the kids "sorry, you must dribble the ball" while calling walking. Say" Hey young man (or girl) you cannot grab their arm as they go by" while calling a holding.

Referee's teach rules - and don't just call violations at these ages.

Everyones a little calmer.
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Old Thu Jan 16, 2003, 04:14pm
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In no specific order –

First and foremost have fun.

Remember that these are 8 to 10/11 year olds. If they are on the same teem the older kids will dominate the court so lookout for the younger ones.

Call the fouls but go light on the violations. If the pivot foot moves a little let it go. If they wonder in the lane tell them to get out before calling 3 or 5 or 10 seconds, depending on what your rules are.

Explain, explain, and explain again, what they did wrong. Get down on your knee to talk to them. Talk in a low voice to them. Until my wife, the kindergarten teacher, enlightened me I had some kids to crying on the court.

Don’t be afraid to applaud a good play and to make jokes when needed. “Hay #23 I know he is your friend but don’t hug him, OK?”

Don’t take anything from the coaches. BUT, don’t make a scene, go up to the coach and tell him to knock it off.

IF THE KIDS GO ON THE FLOOR FOR A LOOSE BALL CALL A JUMP IMMEDIATELY! Kids this age have no fear and someone could/will get hurt. Same with a held ball, as soon as 2 players get their hands on it call a jump.

And remember the younger ones at times get “lost in space” while on the court and have no idea what is going on.

HAVE FUN!
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Old Thu Jan 16, 2003, 04:19pm
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Re: Re: dealing with parents

Quote:
Originally posted by Kris3333
Hehehe I get you drift, and that was the plan actually. And I wasn't going to let any of them know that I'm "fresh meat". Although, some of them may know me because the games are at the high school that my oldest daughter plays for. Yikes!
If you're like most of us in our first game...they will know

Protect the shooter, talk to them about standing in the paint before you blow your whistle, concentrate on your area (this will probably be difficult at first) and ignore the parents. You are new but trust me, you are probably light years ahead of them on rules knowledge...afterall you have actually read the rule book.

And HAVE FUN!
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Old Thu Jan 16, 2003, 04:28pm
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Youth

Well, you picked the right age group to start with IMO. Be sure to go over league rules (i.e. type of defense, pressing, etc.) normally they don't allow zones or pressing at that level. Here's some tips for very young ones:

-Decide how strictly you will enforce traveling and be consistent.
-Don't be too quick to call jump balls, it disrupts the flow of the game and encourages them to reach in. I'd rather call a foul on the reach and point out to them what they did wrong.(I guess I disagree with RecRef on this one)
-Ignore the parents.
-Don't let anyone create a circumstance where someone could get injured.
-Talk to the kids during the game (don't coach, but do point out things along the way much more that you would hear at a HS game i.e. never take the ball out behind the basket, wait until the ball hits. etc.)
-Use a "friendly voice"
-Let them play
-Never call the smallest kid on the court for traveling on their only basket at the end of the game!
-Make sure it is a fun experinece for the kids, never get angry with a coach or parent; walk away no matter what they say.

If the kids don't have fun at that age, they won't stay with it as they get older. Poor youth programs lead to poor HS programs because the kids had bad experiences and lose interest in the sport.

Mregor


[Edited by Mregor on Jan 16th, 2003 at 03:32 PM]
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Old Thu Jan 16, 2003, 04:47pm
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Wow...great response here! The only problem I have, is that I don't exactly know where my "area" is. Guess I didn't get to that part in the books well enough. I realize that one official is the lead and one is the trail, so one stays in front of the offense, and the other behind. I guess it probably doesn't much matter at this age.
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Old Thu Jan 16, 2003, 04:51pm
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Re: Youth

Quote:
Originally posted by Mregor
-Don't be too quick to call jump balls, it disrupts the flow of the game and encourages them to reach in. I'd rather call a foul on the reach and point out to them what they did wrong.(I guess I disagree with RecRef on this one)

Mregor


[Edited by Mregor on Jan 16th, 2003 at 03:32 PM]
Since a reach is not a foul how can you call one? Never use the term reaching in on a basketball court when you ref! You call jumps fast because some can get hurt as the stronger player will whip the ball out of the hold and someone will get hit by the arms/ball.

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Old Thu Jan 16, 2003, 04:59pm
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Wink Re: Re: Youth

Quote:
Originally posted by RecRef
Quote:
Originally posted by Mregor
-Don't be too quick to call jump balls, it disrupts the flow of the game and encourages them to reach in. I'd rather call a foul on the reach and point out to them what they did wrong.(I guess I disagree with RecRef on this one)

Mregor


[Edited by Mregor on Jan 16th, 2003 at 03:32 PM]
Since a reach is not a foul how can you call one? Never use the term reaching in on a basketball court when you ref! You call jumps fast because some can get hurt as the stronger player will whip the ball out of the hold and someone will get hit by the arms/ball.

I call a foul if they make contact while reaching in. I guess it's just easier to type "on the reach" versus "illegal use of the hand when they make contact accross the arm of the person in control of the ball". I stated we had differing opinions. I stated my reasoning as did you. Let those who read it decide what works for them. OK?

P.S. How do you get those smileys in your post? I click on them and they are never in my text.

Mregor
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Old Thu Jan 16, 2003, 04:59pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by Kris3333
Wow...great response here! The only problem I have, is that I don't exactly know where my "area" is. Guess I didn't get to that part in the books well enough. I realize that one official is the lead and one is the trail, so one stays in front of the offense, and the other behind. I guess it probably doesn't much matter at this age.
If you're worried about your area (and that's good), just remember to keep the kids boxed in by you and your co-official. In other words, if you are lead (on the baseline) on the same side as the score table, make sure your partner is at about the FT line on the side opposite the table. Don't leave the action until you are sure of what's happening... at this age you won't get beat down the floor. Keep moving up and down the court in this box fashion. At this point, I wouldn't worry about switching, or anything like that. Just make sure the table can see you when you report anything.

Best fun I've had is at this level. You really are another coach on the floor. AND Smile... it's fun
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Old Thu Jan 16, 2003, 05:16pm
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Re: Re: Re: Youth

Quote:
Originally posted by Mregor
[/B]
How do you get those smileys in your post? I click on them and they are never in my text.

[/B][/QUOTE]Click on "FAQ" at the top of the first page.Then click on "what are smilies" on the FAQ page.The next page explains how to type and insert them into your post.
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Old Thu Jan 16, 2003, 07:33pm
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Re: Youth

Quote:
Originally posted by Mregor
-Don't be too quick to call jump balls, it disrupts the flow of the game and encourages them to reach in. I'd rather call a foul on the reach and point out to them what they did wrong.(I guess I disagree with RecRef on this one)
I agree w/ Mregor on all of his list and I want to endorse the above statement...

You should be able to quickly assess how aggressive, or physical, the players are in a loose ball situation. If they are hustling with reckless abandon then whistle held ball situations quickly.

Also, be quick to set the tone on the illegal use of hands. It is good to set the standard early. It will clean up the play and reenforce that the defenders need to move their feet to play defense. It is better to whistle the illegal use of hand fouls (Reach-ins w/ contact) early, and as often as needed, than to deal with one (or more) player(s) catching an elbow in the face.
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Old Thu Jan 16, 2003, 10:29pm
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My advice to you is to make sure you look at your partner as the last thing you do before you hand the ball to the thrower. This will eliminate you having to blow the whistle while the subs are going in or coming out. Also, you will know that your partner is ready to go and in position. Make sure when you talk to your partner before the game that the official who isn't administering the throw in looks to the table for subs. Nothing is more frustrating for a young kid than being sent in by the coach and the official not letting them in the game. You are the ones who allow subs to come into the game. The level of game you are doing the play will be in one area most of the time. Make sure you aren't hanging down on one end of the court when the play is in the other end. Good luck and above all, HAVE FUN!
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Old Thu Jan 16, 2003, 10:57pm
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Super Excellent Advice, Big Joe

Eye contact with your partner is ESSENTIAL,(did I mention that the table crew are your partners too! ) especially as you are preparing to put the ball in play (Throw-ins, and FTs)

And by all means... Keep smiling! You should be having as much fun as the kids....

Then the next few days after the games, when they are out terrorizing the playground, you will be rubbing your aching muscles with anagesic (sp) balm.

[Edited by williebfree on Jan 17th, 2003 at 09:33 AM]
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