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Old Wed Jan 09, 2002, 12:06pm
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A1 is to inbound on his own endline following a made basket by team B. A1 may run the endline. His inbound pass sails over the head of A2 without being touched and is caught by B1 who is standing OOB on the sideline.

Under the new NF rule, is this the type of defensive violation that would allow team A to "reinbound" on the endline and still be able to run, or is this now a spot throwin for team A where B1 was standing?
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Old Wed Jan 09, 2002, 12:16pm
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Mark, this particular situation does not fall under the new rule. In the play as you've described it, the violation occured ON the sideline. Therefore, the ball would be put in play at that spot (sideline). So, obviously, A cannot run the baseline.

If B1 had caught the ball while standing on the endline, then maybe the rule change applies. I'm not sure. That might also be a T, if he reached thru the OOB plane to catch it.

Chuck
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Old Wed Jan 09, 2002, 12:18pm
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Mark, what would you do if player B1 caught the ball mid air and came down OOB, regardless if it was on an inbounds or not? Probably give A the ball where B1 came down OOB, right? I'd play the same situation here.

Of course, I can't seem to back this up with a rule or case book play....
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Old Wed Jan 09, 2002, 12:53pm
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Why is A1 inbounding on HIS OWN endline after a made basket by B? Why wouldn't A inbound under B's basket? Isn't "ownership" of the basket to the team that shooting there, not like football where the basic ownership is determined by the defense?

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Old Wed Jan 09, 2002, 01:01pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by rainmaker
Why is A1 inbounding on HIS OWN endline after a made basket by B? Why wouldn't A inbound under B's basket? Isn't "ownership" of the basket to the team that shooting there, not like football where the basic ownership is determined by the defense?

Aaaarrrrggghhhh! Juulie - you got me! As you well know, this is only the third mistake I've ever made in my life. I've been married twice, so you do the math.

OK - here's my cop out. A1 owns the gym, so all lines are his. Yeah - pretty weak, I know.
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Old Wed Jan 09, 2002, 01:04pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by Mark Padgett
Aaaarrrrggghhhh! Juulie - you got me!
It's not often that a person gets one on Padgett!! I'll put a little star on the left sleeve of my stripes, to reserve my bragging rights for at least one week.
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Old Wed Jan 09, 2002, 03:21pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by ChuckElias

That might also be a T, if he reached thru the OOB plane to catch it.

Chuck
This is only a T if A is still holding the ball. Once it is released toward the court on an inbounds, no T, even if it is still over the boundary. Could be a warning if B broke the plane prior to the release of the ball, but nothing after.
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Old Wed Jan 09, 2002, 03:31pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by Hawks Coach
This is only a T if A is still holding the ball. Once it is released toward the court on an inbounds, no T, even if it is still over the boundary.
Says who? I'm reading rule 10.3.12 that says a player should be T'd if (s)he reaches "through the throw-in boundary-line plane and touches....the ball...."

Doesn't say anything about the ball being released.

Of course, I'd probably be hesitant to call the T unless it's pretty obvious, but I think a stickler of the rules could have a point.
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Old Wed Jan 09, 2002, 03:53pm
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I believe when the ball is released for the throwin and the def. breaks the BL and touches the ball, this is a warning the 1st time. If the ball is being passed to a team mate OOB and the Def. breaks the BL and touches the ball this is a T. Obviously if the ball is still in the hands of the throwerin and the def. breaks the BL and touches the ball this too is a T.
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Old Wed Jan 09, 2002, 04:11pm
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Once the ball is released on a throw-in (even if it is behind the side line/end line) the defender can reach over/through the line and hit/touch the ball wihtout a violation.
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Old Wed Jan 09, 2002, 04:14pm
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Are you surrrreeeeee.
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Old Wed Jan 09, 2002, 06:50pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by Danvrapp
Quote:
Originally posted by Hawks Coach
This is only a T if A is still holding the ball. Once it is released toward the court on an inbounds, no T, even if it is still over the boundary.
Says who? I'm reading rule 10.3.12 that says a player should be T'd if (s)he reaches "through the throw-in boundary-line plane and touches....the ball...."

Doesn't say anything about the ball being released.

Of course, I'd probably be hesitant to call the T unless it's pretty obvious, but I think a stickler of the rules could have a point.
Right -- but 9-2-11 says "until the ball has been released"

So either one of the two rules is "Wrong" or it's a legal play that results in a T,

Like Crew's discussion on "inbounding the ball without going out of bounds first," this play has received much discussion over the years. Still waiting for the FED to clarify it.
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Old Wed Jan 09, 2002, 06:58pm
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Mark, do you really have to bring this situation up again? At least you didn't throw in the clock this time!
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Old Wed Jan 09, 2002, 07:30pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by Mark Padgett
A1 is to inbound on his own endline following a made basket by team B. A1 may run the endline. His inbound pass sails over the head of A2 without being touched and is caught by B1 who is standing OOB on the sideline.

Under the new NF rule, is this the type of defensive violation that would allow team A to "reinbound" on the endline and still be able to run, or is this now a spot throwin for team A where B1 was standing?
Rookie Chimes in:

Assuming the whole end line thing meant as A was throwing the ball in after a made basket by B....isnt this a throw in violation on A. My NF Book is at work so if someone else has the exact verbage, feel free. My recollection is that a throw in has to be to a player "In Bounds". Since B was OOB and no one else touched the ball....I'm thinking it's B's ball at the POI...in this case, wherever A threw it from.

Now, imagine the Howler Monkeys on that call!

I'm not sure since I dont have my book....Anyone?

Larks
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Old Wed Jan 09, 2002, 08:19pm
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I don't believe this would be a plane violation warning or T for B. But if B was a player standing OOB it could be a T for not all players returning to the court at the same time. I don't believe the plane warning comes into effect unless it's a warning for the line that you're calling. For instance. Is it a warning for a player to have his hands over the opposite end line or the side line? How would you see it or call it if it was? If B was inbounds and caught the ball and his momentum carried him OOB as someone has already mentioned, then it would be A's ball on the sideline. Correct me(and I'm sure you will) if I'm wrong.
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