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  #1 (permalink)  
Old Thu Jan 05, 2006, 10:37am
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Exclamation

Seems as if officials, NFHS/NCAA have different
thoughts on "closely guarded" distances. All seem
to know the 3-foot/6-foot count, but, is it measured
from offensive foot to defensive foot, torso to torso,
arm to arm, body to body, etc.
I have seen officials counting when a defensive arm
goes up and then stop the count when defensive arm
goes down.
Thoughts/comments/suggestions?
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Old Thu Jan 05, 2006, 10:54am
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If any part of the defender is within any part of the ballhandler, I'm counting. So if the defender's hand is the only part that is within 6 feet, I'll count while the hand is out and stop counting when the hand is down.
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Old Thu Jan 05, 2006, 12:41pm
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Reviewing exact wording the book says simply continuously guarded by any opponent who is within 6 feet of the player who is holding or dribbling the ball.

Step further question. The count ends when the offense "beats" the defender by "getting their head and shoulders past the defender".

Say your burning some clock. Guards are moving parallel with division line but close to a team really wanting the ball.

Is "head and shoulders" realitive to
1) the basket?
2) the direction of the player?
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Old Thu Jan 05, 2006, 12:58pm
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Question

Quote:
Originally posted by Ref Daddy

Reviewing exact wording the book says simply continuously guarded by any opponent who is within 6 feet of the player who is holding or dribbling the ball.

Step further question. The count ends when the offense "beats" the defender by "getting their head and shoulders past the defender".

Say your burning some clock. Guards are moving parallel with division line but close to a team really wanting the ball.

Is "head and shoulders" realitive to
1) the basket?
2) the direction of the player?
Ref Daddy,
Where do I find the written "head and shoulders" reference?
Thanks.
mick
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Old Thu Jan 05, 2006, 02:01pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by Ref Daddy
The count ends when the offense "beats" the defender by "getting their head and shoulders past the defender".

Say your burning some clock. Guards are moving parallel with division line but close to a team really wanting the ball.

Is "head and shoulders" realitive to
1) the basket?
2) the direction of the player? [/B]
It's relative to the direction of the player. The rules citation- R10-6-2- sez "If a dribbler ,without contact, sufficiently passes an opponent to have head and shoulders in advance in advance of that opponent, the greater responsibility for subsequent contact is on the defender" Case book play 4.23.3SitA spells out the same concept. It relates solely to the path that dribbler is taking, and that path doesn't have to be towards the basket.

The count does end in this case also because the defender lost LGP when the dribbler got by him. The definition of guarding in R4-23-1 sez that guarding is "legally placing the body in the path of an offensive opponent". If you're illegally placing your body in an offensive opponent's path, you can't have or be maintaining LGP.
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Old Thu Jan 05, 2006, 02:29pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by mick
Quote:
Originally posted by Ref Daddy

Reviewing exact wording the book says simply continuously guarded by any opponent who is within 6 feet of the player who is holding or dribbling the ball.

Step further question. The count ends when the offense "beats" the defender by "getting their head and shoulders past the defender".

Say your burning some clock. Guards are moving parallel with division line but close to a team really wanting the ball.

Is "head and shoulders" realitive to
1) the basket?
2) the direction of the player?
Ref Daddy,
Where do I find the written "head and shoulders" reference?
Thanks.
mick

2004 POE:
1. Closely guarded. Well-officiated closely-guarded situations provide for better balance between offense and defense. When the closely guarded rules are not followed, there is a significant advantage for the offense. The following four areas are to be emphasized:

A. When to start. A closely guarded situation occurs when a player in control of the ball in his or her team's front court, is guarded by an opponent who is within six feet of that player who is holding or dribbling the ball. It should also be emphasized that the defensive player must obtain a legal guarding position.

A player shall not hold the ball for five seconds or dribble the ball for five seconds while closely guarded in his or her front court. A player can legally hold the ball while closely guarded for four seconds, dribble the ball for four seconds and hold the ball again for four seconds before violating.

B. When to stop. A closely-guarded count ends when no defensive player is within six feet. The count also stops when a closely guarded player (a) completes a dribble anywhere in the team's own front court; (b) starts a dribble in the team's own frontcourt and ends it anywhere in the frontcourt (a new five-second count will start if the player holds the ball); (c) loses possession of the ball for any reason in the team's own frontcourt; or (d) has his or her dribble interrupted. If a closely-guarded player beats the defender(s) by getting head and shoulders past the defensive player, the count has ended.
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Old Thu Jan 05, 2006, 03:13pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by Ref Daddy
Quote:
Originally posted by mick
Quote:
Originally posted by Ref Daddy

Reviewing exact wording the book says simply continuously guarded by any opponent who is within 6 feet of the player who is holding or dribbling the ball.

Step further question. The count ends when the offense "beats" the defender by "getting their head and shoulders past the defender".

Say your burning some clock. Guards are moving parallel with division line but close to a team really wanting the ball.

Is "head and shoulders" realitive to
1) the basket?
2) the direction of the player?
Ref Daddy,
Where do I find the written "head and shoulders" reference?
Thanks.
mick

2004 POE:
1. Closely guarded. Well-officiated closely-guarded situations provide for better balance between offense and defense. When the closely guarded rules are not followed, there is a significant advantage for the offense. The following four areas are to be emphasized:

A. When to start. A closely guarded situation occurs when a player in control of the ball in his or her team's front court, is guarded by an opponent who is within six feet of that player who is holding or dribbling the ball. It should also be emphasized that the defensive player must obtain a legal guarding position.

A player shall not hold the ball for five seconds or dribble the ball for five seconds while closely guarded in his or her front court. A player can legally hold the ball while closely guarded for four seconds, dribble the ball for four seconds and hold the ball again for four seconds before violating.

B. When to stop. A closely-guarded count ends when no defensive player is within six feet. The count also stops when a closely guarded player (a) completes a dribble anywhere in the team's own front court; (b) starts a dribble in the team's own frontcourt and ends it anywhere in the frontcourt (a new five-second count will start if the player holds the ball); (c) loses possession of the ball for any reason in the team's own frontcourt; or (d) has his or her dribble interrupted. If a closely-guarded player beats the defender(s) by getting head and shoulders past the defensive player, the count has ended.
Thank ya, thank ya!
mick
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  #8 (permalink)  
Old Thu Jan 05, 2006, 04:34pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by Jurassic Referee
Quote:
Originally posted by Ref Daddy
The count ends when the offense "beats" the defender by "getting their head and shoulders past the defender".

Say your burning some clock. Guards are moving parallel with division line but close to a team really wanting the ball.

Is "head and shoulders" realitive to
1) the basket?
2) the direction of the player?
It's relative to the direction of the player. The rules citation- R10-6-2- sez "If a dribbler ,without contact, sufficiently passes an opponent to have head and shoulders in advance in advance of that opponent, the greater responsibility for subsequent contact is on the defender" Case book play 4.23.3SitA spells out the same concept. It relates solely to the path that dribbler is taking, and that path doesn't have to be towards the basket.

The count does end in this case also because the defender lost LGP when the dribbler got by him. The definition of guarding in R4-23-1 sez that guarding is "legally placing the body in the path of an offensive opponent". If you're illegally placing your body in an offensive opponent's path, you can't have or be maintaining LGP. [/B]
So are you saying you are dropping a count if A1 is moving backwards or sideways, but B1 is still within 6 feet, because B1 is not in A1 direct path?

If so you are saying that the intent of the rule is to force B1 to defend A1 from a boundary line by re-establishing in A1's new path before we count.

I totally disagree with that interpretation, because if that is the case all A1 would have to do is stay in one spot and pivot away from B1 every 4 seconds.
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  #9 (permalink)  
Old Thu Jan 05, 2006, 04:43pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by observer
Seems as if officials, NFHS/NCAA have different
thoughts on "closely guarded" distances. All seem
to know the 3-foot/6-foot count, but, is it measured
from offensive foot to defensive foot, torso to torso,
arm to arm, body to body, etc.
I have seen officials counting when a defensive arm
goes up and then stop the count when defensive arm
goes down.
Thoughts/comments/suggestions?
NCAA specifically defines the distance as between the feet of the players.

I tend to use that in NFHS games.

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Old Thu Jan 05, 2006, 05:04pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by blindzebra
So are you saying you are dropping a count if A1 is moving backwards or sideways, but B1 is still within 6 feet, because B1 is not in A1 direct path?
NO! PLEASE, GOD, NO!!! NOT AGAIN!!!!
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Old Thu Jan 05, 2006, 05:14pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by ChuckElias
Quote:
Originally posted by blindzebra
So are you saying you are dropping a count if A1 is moving backwards or sideways, but B1 is still within 6 feet, because B1 is not in A1 direct path?
NO! PLEASE, GOD, NO!!! NOT AGAIN!!!!
Come on it's a legit question, that if you take what JR said literally, you would drop a count.

Direct path is only needed to gain LGP and thus start a count, that is not lost if A1 moves backwards or sideways and B1 moves with them, but not in their direct path, IMO.
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Old Thu Jan 05, 2006, 05:16pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by blindzebra
Quote:
Originally posted by ChuckElias
Quote:
Originally posted by blindzebra
So are you saying you are dropping a count if A1 is moving backwards or sideways, but B1 is still within 6 feet, because B1 is not in A1 direct path?
NO! PLEASE, GOD, NO!!! NOT AGAIN!!!!
Come on it's a legit question, that if you take what JR said literally, you would drop a count.

Direct path is only needed to gain LGP and thus start a count, that is not lost if A1 moves backwards or sideways and B1 moves with them, but not in their direct path, IMO.
Now he's gotchya Chuck. C'mon Chuck, what's the answer now, Chuck?
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Old Thu Jan 05, 2006, 05:28pm
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ART. 3 . . . After the initial legal guarding position is obtained:

a. The guard may have one or both feet on the playing court or be airborne, provided he/she has inbound status.
b. The guard is not required to continue facing the opponent.
c. The guard may move laterally or obliquely to maintain position, provided it is not toward the opponent when contact occurs.
d. The guard may raise hands or jump within his/her own vertical plane.
e. The guard may turn or duck to absorb the shock of imminent contact.

If you are not facing, you may or may not be in the direct path.

If you are moving laterally to maintain, you are not in the direct path of A1.
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Old Thu Jan 05, 2006, 05:40pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by Ref Daddy

Reviewing exact wording the book says simply continuously guarded by any opponent who is within 6 feet of the player who is holding or dribbling the ball.

Step further question. The count ends when the offense "beats" the defender by "getting their head and shoulders past the defender".

Say your burning some clock. Guards are moving parallel with division line but close to a team really wanting the ball.

Is "head and shoulders" realitive to
1) the basket?
2) the direction of the player?
I remember reading or hearing the above somewhere "The count ends when the offense "beats" the defender by "getting their head and shoulders past the defender"" but I am unable to verify this in my books.

My understanding that closely guarded shall terminate only when there is an interruption with the players dribble or the defender is not guarding within 6 feet (Rule 9-10, Case 9.10.1 SITUATION A(a) & SITUATION B).

And what is everyone’s reply to when A1 dribbles towards the basket while being closely guarded by B1, and or continues through the free-throw lanes?

I feel a closely guarded situation exists yet my association wants it called off whenever a player dribbles north/south towards the basket.

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Old Thu Jan 05, 2006, 06:05pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by Ref Daddy
Quote:
Originally posted by mick
Quote:
Originally posted by Ref Daddy

Reviewing exact wording the book says simply continuously guarded by any opponent who is within 6 feet of the player who is holding or dribbling the ball.

Step further question. The count ends when the offense "beats" the defender by "getting their head and shoulders past the defender".

Say your burning some clock. Guards are moving parallel with division line but close to a team really wanting the ball.

Is "head and shoulders" realitive to
1) the basket?
2) the direction of the player?
Ref Daddy,
Where do I find the written "head and shoulders" reference?
Thanks.
mick

2004 POE:
1. Closely guarded. Well-officiated closely-guarded situations provide for better balance between offense and defense. When the closely guarded rules are not followed, there is a significant advantage for the offense. The following four areas are to be emphasized:

A. When to start. A closely guarded situation occurs when a player in control of the ball in his or her team's front court, is guarded by an opponent who is within six feet of that player who is holding or dribbling the ball. It should also be emphasized that the defensive player must obtain a legal guarding position.

A player shall not hold the ball for five seconds or dribble the ball for five seconds while closely guarded in his or her front court. A player can legally hold the ball while closely guarded for four seconds, dribble the ball for four seconds and hold the ball again for four seconds before violating.

B. When to stop. A closely-guarded count ends when no defensive player is within six feet. The count also stops when a closely guarded player (a) completes a dribble anywhere in the team's own front court; (b) starts a dribble in the team's own frontcourt and ends it anywhere in the frontcourt (a new five-second count will start if the player holds the ball); (c) loses possession of the ball for any reason in the team's own frontcourt; or (d) has his or her dribble interrupted. If a closely-guarded player beats the defender(s) by getting head and shoulders past the defensive player, the count has ended.
I vaguely remember possible reading this somewhere but I am unable to located the above If a closely-guarded player beats the defender(s) by getting head and shoulders past the defensive player, the count has ended. in the books.

I do not have my 2004 books anymore, would you post the reference to where it can be found.

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