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  #16 (permalink)  
Old Sat Jan 23, 2021, 06:50pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LRZ View Post
Team control no longer existed once A1 releases the ball on the dunk attempt (a "try"), and team control was not established until A2, while in the air, caught the ball. If, as I read the OP, A2 then lands with both feet simultaneously, one foot in the front court and the other in the back court, both A2 and the ball have backcourt status, but the offense would not be "last to touch" in the front court while in team control (BillyMac's third factor), which ended on the try.

I don't see it as an exception, written or unwritten, but the application of the rule consistent with the intent and purpose of the rule. I would have no violation--but I would begin a 10-second count.
If that were true, then a "touched loose ball" on a throw-in would have the same exception -- as was once debated vociferously on here. The NFHS made it clear that wasn't the case. There's only a "defense" if one team is in control. If neither team is in control, then there's no offense nor defense (at least for this rule).

I agree it *shouldn't* be a violation, but I think it is.
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  #17 (permalink)  
Old Sat Jan 23, 2021, 07:35pm
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Offense ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by LRZ View Post
At the moment you grab a long rebound at midcourt, are you on offense or defense?
The moment you "grab" (hold, possess) a rebound, you're on offense. I can't imagine a player holding a ball being thought of as anything other than on offense.

Now, the split second before you "grab" (hold, possess) it, that's another story because there's no team control (it's a rebound so there must have been a shot and a loss of team control before the "grab" (hold, possess).
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  #18 (permalink)  
Old Sat Jan 23, 2021, 10:53pm
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I do not know how you have a violation? I get that they said this was an exception for the defense, but anyone can get a rebound and we do not have the same rules. I would only change my mind with a case play or interpretation.

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  #19 (permalink)  
Old Sun Jan 24, 2021, 12:09pm
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Shakespeare 's Hamlet On The Forum, Classy ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by JRutledge View Post
I do not know how you have a violation?
I believe that the debate here is about the defense exception, and whether, or not, it applies to this exact situation, especially if, or if not, considering intent and purpose.

Since this situation is not the "classic" defensive mid-air steal of a mid-air pass (assuming nobody's on offense or defense during a try), let's, for just now, forget about the defense exception, pretend that it never existed in the rulebook.

Then it comes down to whether or not the situation checks off all four components of a backcourt violation.

The four elements for having a backcourt violation here are: there must be team control; the ball must have achieved frontcourt status; the team in team control must be the last to touch the ball before it goes into the backcourt; that same team must be the first to touch after the ball has been in the backcourt.

I believe that all four components of a backcourt violation have been met.

But in the real world, there is a defense exception and there is intent and purpose.

9-9-3 Backcourt: While on defense, a player may legally jump from his/her frontcourt, secure control of the ball with both feet off the floor and return to the floor with one or both feet in the backcourt.

Does this specific situation meet the criteria for the 9-9-3 defense exception?

No, because nobody's on offense or defense during a try (no team control) and the exception clearly states "while on defense". It doesn't say "while not on offense"

However, was the intent and purpose of the defense exception rule to allow such a situation as this one to be interpreted as a legal play?

Ay, there's the rub.
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Last edited by BillyMac; Tue Jan 26, 2021 at 11:25am.
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