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Old Fri Jan 15, 2016, 10:50am
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10 seconds and shot clock

In CA, HS uses the shot clock. At a recent game, we had many close 10 second counts -- in a couple of cases, 10 seconds appeared to have run off the shot clock, causing great consternation in the stands. Is my memorycorrect that HS officials are instructed not to use the shot clock to determine a 10 second violation?
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Old Fri Jan 15, 2016, 10:59am
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Originally Posted by so cal lurker View Post
In CA, HS uses the shot clock. At a recent game, we had many close 10 second counts -- in a couple of cases, 10 seconds appeared to have run off the shot clock, causing great consternation in the stands. Is my memorycorrect that HS officials are instructed not to use the shot clock to determine a 10 second violation?
You would need to check the rules supplements for California HS basketball.
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Old Fri Jan 15, 2016, 11:16am
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Originally Posted by so cal lurker View Post
In CA, HS uses the shot clock. At a recent game, we had many close 10 second counts -- in a couple of cases, 10 seconds appeared to have run off the shot clock, causing great consternation in the stands. Is my memorycorrect that HS officials are instructed not to use the shot clock to determine a 10 second violation?
Yes, that is correct. The level of shot clock operator competency is not high at many games, and often the shot clock is started too early.
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Old Fri Jan 15, 2016, 11:31am
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Originally Posted by JohnDorian37 View Post
Yes, that is correct. The level of shot clock operator competency is not high at many games, and often the shot clock is started too early.
Thanks -- that's what I thought the reason was.
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Old Fri Jan 15, 2016, 11:39am
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This is coming from a guy that works in a state without a shot clock, so take it for what it worth, but my understanding is that there are a few reasons using the shot clock to determine a 10 second violation is discouraged.

1. Already mentioned - shot clock may not be started properly
2. Shot clock isn't inherently synchronized with the 10 second count at all times. Various circumstances could cause the 10 second count to be reset.
3. The most practical reason that I've heard, however, is that if an official is watching the shot clock, he/she isn't watching the action on the court. While a slow count can draw the ire of the defense, missing a foul or some other violation because the crew is looking at the shot clock would be worse especially if there is no 10 second violation. There is more often than not going to be action that requires our attention be on the court if there is the potential for a 10 second violation. I can count to 10 and watch the action at the same time, but I don't know that I could watch the action on the court and the shot clock at the same time.
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Old Fri Jan 15, 2016, 11:47am
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Originally Posted by BoomerSooner View Post
3. The most practical reason that I've heard, however, is that if an official is watching the shot clock, he/she isn't watching the action on the court. While a slow count can draw the ire of the defense, missing a foul or some other violation because the crew is looking at the shot clock would be worse especially if there is no 10 second violation. There is more often than not going to be action that requires our attention be on the court if there is the potential for a 10 second violation. I can count to 10 and watch the action at the same time, but I don't know that I could watch the action on the court and the shot clock at the same time.
The C or the L can get this call. Not all three officials will have enough action so they can't glance at the shot clock.
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Old Fri Jan 15, 2016, 12:52pm
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CA rules exceptions

There is no rules exception in California to use the shot clock for determining a 10-second backcourt violation. The ten seconds is determined by the trail's count, as outlined in NFHS rules.

The shot clock does start on a touch by any player, so you could very easily have the clock start and have no player control and therefore no team control and thus the ten second count does not start.

Also, the level of competency of the shot clock operators can be a factor as well as the officials' level of clock awareness.
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Old Fri Jan 15, 2016, 01:35pm
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Originally Posted by BoomerSooner View Post
... but I don't know that I could watch the action on the court and the shot clock at the same time.
You don't need to stare down the shot clock. Quit glances are all that is needed. If some action occurs close to the expiration of the 10-second countdown, the C and L are supposed to help as Bob stated.
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Last edited by Raymond; Fri Jan 15, 2016 at 03:24pm.
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Old Fri Jan 15, 2016, 02:51pm
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[QUOTE=referee99;976728]

The shot clock does start on a touch by any player, so you could very easily have the clock start and have no player control and therefore no team control and thus the ten second count does not start.

QUOTE]

This is the main reason not to use the shot clock for 10 second count in HS game. It works in NCAA-M because rule on when to start the 10 second count is different.
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