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Old Fri Oct 12, 2007, 09:45am
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"On The Field" and "To The Sideline"

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob M.
REPLY: Of course if it's a major injury that will require a long time on the field, common sense dictates that you send the teams to their sidelines until the field is cleared. But your standard run of the mill injury (cramp, etc.) is nothing more than an official's time out. Keep the players on the field so that you can be ready to go once the injured player leaves.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blue37
Bob,

How are you defining "on the field"?
This question was at the bottom of a thread and seems to have been overlooked. What is "on the field" and "to their sideline"?
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Old Fri Oct 12, 2007, 10:22am
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blue37
This question was at the bottom of a thread and seems to have been overlooked. What is "on the field" and "to their sideline"?
On most fields, they've drawn a thick white line that we colloquially refer to as the "sideline". To the sideline means that they should go over by this line I speak of.

This sideline thingy marks of sort of a rectangle (on most fields). That is called "the field". On the field means On that rectangle thingy.

(No one answered your question because it's rather straightforward).
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Old Fri Oct 12, 2007, 11:47am
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Lightbulb Ohio Ruling

When refering to on the field, we in Ohio might say that the team must be within the numbers (or 9 yard markings) for an injury timeout unless it will be extensive.
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Old Fri Oct 12, 2007, 12:21pm
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In my association on Florida we treat an injury timeout the same way we treat the time between downs. Any number of players can go to their sideline. They must stay on the field to remain in the game.
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Old Fri Oct 12, 2007, 12:49pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mbcrowder
On most fields, they've drawn a thick white line that we colloquially refer to as the "sideline". To the sideline means that they should go over by this line I speak of.

This sideline thingy marks of sort of a rectangle (on most fields). That is called "the field". On the field means On that rectangle thingy.

(No one answered your question because it's rather straightforward).
I'll ignore the poor attempt at sarcasm and address the illogical construction of your answer.

If "to the sideline" means they should go over by the thick white line, and "on the field" means to stay on the rectangle thingy defined by the white line, then, to use your definitions, if they go to the sideline, they are still on the field.

Bob M. made a distinction in the two in his answer. I'm wondering why he made the distinction. How about it Bob? How do you define the two terms?
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Old Fri Oct 12, 2007, 01:29pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blue37
I'll ignore the poor attempt at sarcasm and address the illogical construction of your answer.

If "to the sideline" means they should go over by the thick white line, and "on the field" means to stay on the rectangle thingy defined by the white line, then, to use your definitions, if they go to the sideline, they are still on the field.

Bob M. made a distinction in the two in his answer. I'm wondering why he made the distinction. How about it Bob? How do you define the two terms?
I'm guessing that "to the sideline" means to go to the team bench area and out of bounds, which is near the sideline.
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Old Fri Oct 12, 2007, 02:06pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sonofanump
When refering to on the field, we in Ohio might say that the team must be within the numbers (or 9 yard markings) for an injury timeout unless it will be extensive.
REPLY: Respectfully, you would be wrong. Look at the NOTE on NF9-8-1f: "Between downs, communications between players and coaches near the sideline are not an unauthorized conference." A player (or players) can go all the way over to the sideline as long as they stay on the field.
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