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Old Wed Sep 07, 2005, 05:07pm
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This was handed out at a clinic that was given to officials
as part of a clinic put on by some Big Ten and NFL officials.

You may find it interesting...

Classification of Holds

1) BEAR HUG - Arms surrounding opponent

2) WRAP/GRAB & TURN - Hands are on the outside of the shoulders and opponent is actually turned over to one side or the other

3) SHOULDER DIP - Player may have hands inside on the chest or outside on the shoulders. When runner passes there is a noticable dip in the should of the opponent.

4) SHIRT STRETCH - Players hand inside on chest - as players disengage there is a clear stretch of the shirt.

5) PULLOVER - It looks like player is being run over by the opponent but has grabbed the shirt on the chest and pulled the opponent down on himself.

6) GRAB OF LEG - Generally done when the player is on the gound, will reach out and grab the leg.

YOU MUST - Make sure something happens - even if a player attempts to hold but the opponent runs right through his attempt - no foul should be called.

KEYS -
ADVANTAGE/DISADVANTAGE
POINT OF ATTACK
DIRECTION OF RUSHER (is the rusher just dancing with the player or is he actively pursuing the ball )
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Old Wed Sep 07, 2005, 07:57pm
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These are some great points, I like this. I will be saving it.
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Old Wed Sep 07, 2005, 08:03pm
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on a similar note, i have pass interference clarifications:

Pass Interference Classifications
Pass Interference is defined as an act that interferes with a player’s (either an eligible offensive receiver or a defender) ability to move toward, catch or bat the pass.
Acts that are defined as pass interference can be classified into six categories for defense and into three categories for offense.
The six categories of DPI are:
1. Not Playing the Ball
The defender must be playing/looking for the ball. Not turning to look for the ball is a clear indication of playing the man and not the ball. This includes face guarding.
2. Playing through the back of an eligible receiver who has established position
3. Grabbing the arm of an eligible receiver
May not always be visible to the covering official. The offside official may need to help.
4. “The Arm Bar”
Extending the arm across the opponent’s body.
5. Cutting off the path of an eligible receiver
Either by being in front of the receiver and slowing down; or, by “riding” the receiver.
6. “Hook and Turn”
Placing a hand on the receiver is not a foul. The defender needs to hook or grab and turn the receiver.
The three categories of OPI are:
1. Blocking downfield before the ball has been touched
Also referred to as “the pick play.” Not a foul if the receiver is being contacted/ridden by a defender.
2. Shoving or pushing off and creating separation
3. Driving through a defender who had established position

The following acts/contact would not be deemed DPI:
1. Inadvertent tripping
If both players are looking for the ball – No foul.
If one is looking and the other is not – The foul would be on the player not looking for the ball. A foul for not playing the ball is indicated.
2. A had or hands placed on the receiver with no turning of the receiver
3. Contact by a defender with position to get to the ball and even with the receiver
Why are Pass Interference calls missed?
1. The official is not in proper position
We must work hard to be in the best position to see the action between receiver and defender.
2. The official is watching the ball and not the player(s)
Must look at head and body to see where players are looking and any contact
3. The official is not following his/her “keys”
Watching the wrong receiver
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Old Wed Sep 07, 2005, 08:44pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by l3will

3) SHOULDER DIP - Player may have hands inside on the chest or outside on the shoulders. When runner passes there is a noticable dip in the should of the opponent.
Nice post. What if you clearly see the shoulder dip while his hands are inside and you don't actually see the physical grab? In other words you're very certain you have a hold based on what you see but you really don't see the grab inside.
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Old Thu Sep 08, 2005, 08:54am
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REPLY: A friend of mine told me what the NFL looks for when a player is suspect for holding at the point of attack: Look for the blockee to make an “unathletic move.” That is, look for him to make a move that in no way resembles what an athlete might do if he were pursuing a runner in a natural, unrestricted way. Examples: look for his shoulders to spin away from his direction of movement; look for his arm to be pulled away from the side of his body so that his balance is compromised. And the big one…look for the blockee to “lose his legs.” This last one deserves a better description. When an athlete moves, he typically has his body over his legs, which provide balance and a foundation for movement. If a player is restricted by an opponent in a manner such that either his legs are pulled out from under his upper body, or his upper body is held so that his unrestricted legs move out from under him, he has “lost his legs.” In such cases, the action by the blocker has clearly prevented his opponent from moving naturally toward the ball carrier. When such a restriction takes place at or close to the point of attack, you have a hold.

Suppose two opponents are facing off at the line of scrimmage. The offensive player grabs a handful of jersey inside. The two continue to face off as the runner passes by them. The NFL calls this a “dance” and will most likely not flag it if the defender is happy to just stand there in an embrace with his opponent. But, if the defender in this scenario makes a move toward the runner and a real restriction to his movement is obvious, you’ll undoubtedly see a flag.

Many college officials use these principles as well. I personally see no reason why they can’t also be used as your decision criteria in lower levels of football.
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Old Thu Sep 08, 2005, 09:01am
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Thumbs up

As a new official, this being my first year doing football, this is a great help in "classifying" and understanding what to call holding and pass interference. Any other tips like this out there?
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Old Thu Sep 08, 2005, 12:01pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by Bob M.
Suppose two opponents are facing off at the line of scrimmage. The offensive player grabs a handful of jersey inside. The two continue to face off as the runner passes by them. The NFL calls this a “dance” and will most likely not flag it if the defender is happy to just stand there in an embrace with his opponent. But, if the defender in this scenario makes a move toward the runner and a real restriction to his movement is obvious, you’ll undoubtedly see a flag.
I threw a flag for exactly this situation last week. But I'll readily admit I didn't see the grab which is why I'm asking about this. I was certain I had a hold but you could make a clear argument that I guessed and that's where I was wrong.

And...later on the wing official who was on the other side of the field actually saw the jersey grabbed from his viewpoint but didn't want to throw a flag that far away. So in the end I was correct but I was told by more senior officials I shouldn't have thrown that flag because again I was technically guessing.
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Old Thu Sep 08, 2005, 09:24pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by ljudge
Quote:
Originally posted by Bob M.
Suppose two opponents are facing off at the line of scrimmage. The offensive player grabs a handful of jersey inside. The two continue to face off as the runner passes by them. The NFL calls this a �dance� and will most likely not flag it if the defender is happy to just stand there in an embrace with his opponent. But, if the defender in this scenario makes a move toward the runner and a real restriction to his movement is obvious, you�ll undoubtedly see a flag.
I threw a flag for exactly this situation last week. But I'll readily admit I didn't see the grab which is why I'm asking about this. I was certain I had a hold but you could make a clear argument that I guessed and that's where I was wrong.

And...later on the wing official who was on the other side of the field actually saw the jersey grabbed from his viewpoint but didn't want to throw a flag that far away. So in the end I was correct but I was told by more senior officials I shouldn't have thrown that flag because again I was technically guessing.
Which part of the situation? Did the defender try to make
a move towards the runner or try to shed the block? If not,
my personal philosophy is no foul.
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Old Fri Sep 09, 2005, 07:24am
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The back was "turning the corner" and the defender was facing his blocker and tried to move laterally as the back was turning up field close to the sideline. The defender tried to move laterally to "get outside" and make the tackle. That's when I noticed shoulder dip that I3will mentioned. It was pretty obvious** to me he was being held even though I didn't think of the term I3will mentioned until I read his post.

** - I guess you can say circumstantially.

So I'd like to get back to my original question. If you don't technically see the hand grab the jersey and have a situation such as this one I described what do you have?

I asked a college official and he said if you don't actually see the grab even though you're certain a hold occurred, keep the hankie in the pocket. You guys agree?
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Old Fri Sep 09, 2005, 08:34am
MJT MJT is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by ljudge


So I'd like to get back to my original question. If you don't technically see the hand grab the jersey and have a situation such as this one I described what do you have?

I asked a college official and he said if you don't actually see the grab even though you're certain a hold occurred, keep the hankie in the pocket. You guys agree?
If you see a definite restriction, and the only way it happened was a hold and if it was at the point of attack, then call a hold. Just because you couldn't actually "see" his hands doesn't mean you couldn't see what his hands did as a result of the opponents movements. In that case you have a flag on the ground.
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