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Old Tue Dec 10, 2002, 03:28pm
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Question

Greetings and Happy Holidays . . . I thought I'd ask a few questions about proper mechanics. I understand that good "preventative" officiating can generally avoid certain situations.
Q1) When Player A1 is throwing the ball in-bounds from a designated spot and A1 takes off running the endline like it was a made basket. This is a violation (not traveling), what is the proper mechanic?
Q2) In the event that B1 is out-of-bounds in the normal events of the play, then returns to the court to be the first player to touch the ball; however, upon B1's return he enters the court at a point 10 feet from the place he first went out of bounds. This again is a violation. What is the proper mechanic?
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Old Tue Dec 10, 2002, 03:36pm
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Based on what rule do you believe your scenario in Q2 is a violation?
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Old Tue Dec 10, 2002, 03:42pm
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Location: Cincinnati, OH
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Quote:
Originally posted by JHut17
Greetings and Happy Holidays . . . I thought I'd ask a few questions about proper mechanics. I understand that good "preventative" officiating can generally avoid certain situations.
Q1) When Player A1 is throwing the ball in-bounds from a designated spot and A1 takes off running the endline like it was a made basket. This is a violation (not traveling), what is the proper mechanic?
Q2) In the event that B1 is out-of-bounds in the normal events of the play, then returns to the court to be the first player to touch the ball; however, upon B1's return he enters the court at a point 10 feet from the place he first went out of bounds. This again is a violation. What is the proper mechanic?
I dont know if there is a set mechanic...here is what I do:

I stop the clock (open hand up + whistle), point at the spot the violation occurred. Then I'll point the new direction of play. After all that, I'll verbally tell the violater what they did and of course sometimes have to relay that same message to the coach.

Old Guys....does this sound right?

Larks
VIT
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Old Tue Dec 10, 2002, 03:51pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by Larks
Quote:
Originally posted by JHut17
Greetings and Happy Holidays . . . I thought I'd ask a few questions about proper mechanics. I understand that good "preventative" officiating can generally avoid certain situations.
Q1) When Player A1 is throwing the ball in-bounds from a designated spot and A1 takes off running the endline like it was a made basket. This is a violation (not traveling), what is the proper mechanic?
Q2) In the event that B1 is out-of-bounds in the normal events of the play, then returns to the court to be the first player to touch the ball; however, upon B1's return he enters the court at a point 10 feet from the place he first went out of bounds. This again is a violation. What is the proper mechanic?
I dont know if there is a set mechanic...here is what I do:

I stop the clock (open hand up + whistle), point at the spot the violation occurred. Then I'll point the new direction of play. After all that, I'll verbally tell the violater what they did and of course sometimes have to relay that same message to the coach.

Old Guys....does this sound right?

Larks
VIT
I don't know about the old guys smack, but yes, that is pretty much the proper mechanic. It is a throw-in violation, but one that needs some verbal backup to sell. Also, you are correct in that this can be prevented by telling the player "it's a spot throw-in". At the lower levels you may even tell them what that means, i.e., "you stay put when I give you the ball it's a spot throw", then when you get to high school kids you should just have to say spot throw and point (it's a good idea to point that way everyone has seen you tell them). If they still violate, so be it, you have put the burden entirely on their shoulders.
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Old Wed Dec 11, 2002, 07:14am
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JHut,
The proper signal for a throw-in designated-spot violation is listed on page 75 of the NFHS rules book. It is signal #21. It involves pointing at the spot and then pointing over to where the player ran. This is also what you should use when a free throw shooter steps over the line.

Now your question #2 is not a violation. It is either a no call or a technical foul on the player for leaving the court for an unauthorized reason. You must decide if the player got a significant advantage by running out of bounds for those 10 feet. If so, it is a T.
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