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  #1 (permalink)  
Old Sun Feb 24, 2008, 09:44am
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Let's talk "T"s

I know, you should call me Mr. "T". but I have a friend last night he called 4 ( yes four ) in 2 games. I think that might be a local record. The first 2 were good and easy calls. Player A1 goes in for a shot, gets fouled, then B1 throws the ball at A1 and hits him in the head. "T". As A1 is shooting his free throw, B1 screams at the official who called the "T". Another "T" and he's gone. His team won the game easily.

Game 2- Coach out of control complaining "T", then another "T" later in that game, I forget why, but I know it was on a player. The team that was "T"ed up won both games. All 4 "T"s were on the same home team. JV and Varsity.

Just thought I'd share. Some times I wonder if we "T" people up because we are in a bad mood. But the "T"s sounded justified to me.

I know I have used the "T" because I felt the coaches were questioning my integrity or my ability.
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Old Sun Feb 24, 2008, 10:22am
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Terrapins Fan
Player A1 goes in for a shot, gets fouled, then B1 throws the ball at A1 and hits him in the head. "T".
Would anybody consider this to be a disqualifying foul?
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  #3 (permalink)  
Old Sun Feb 24, 2008, 10:26am
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Yup. It happens. And when they're from the same team (different ages), one wonders if there is a common denominator, rather than coincidence.

As for T's, they're just another type of foul. Call it and move on. Sounds like your P handled things well.

I think that part of what experience teaches us is to learn how to seperate our bad moods from doing the job we're asked to do, with integrity and success.
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Old Sun Feb 24, 2008, 10:27am
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rgncjn
Would anybody consider this to be a disqualifying foul?
Completely!
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  #5 (permalink)  
Old Sun Feb 24, 2008, 11:38am
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Personally, I spend my time regretting the T's I should have dealt... than the one's I have.
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Old Sun Feb 24, 2008, 01:33pm
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"We were going to have a "T" party" © 2008 Mark Padgett

Technical Fouls

Top Reasons To Not Give A Technical Foul
• You can address a coach before it becomes a problem. A quiet word can go a long way in preventing a technical foul.
• When coaches complain, ask yourself, is the call questionable, is the call wrong. If they have a legitimate gripe, then allow them some latitude. Be courteous. Do not argue. Be firm and fair
• If you know a coach is upset then move away from him or her, even if it means that you and your partner are not switching or rotating properly.
• Warnings can be very effective in preventing situations from escalating. Don't tolerate a lot before a warning.
• Lend a resonable ear. Coaches like to be heard. If you ignore them then they become more frustrated and are more likely to lose control.
• If an assistant is out of line, then you can speak to the head coach and ask them to help you out.
• If a player is out of line then let the coach know. Tell them you've warned their player. That way if you do give a technical foul, then the coach isn't surprised. Most good coaches will speak to the player first.
• If you have had a rough day and know your fuse is short, keep that in mind before you do anything rash. Ask yourself, does the situation come under one of the top reasons to give a technical foul.
• If necessary, give an initial strong warning. Let your partner know about the warning.

Top Reasons To Give A Technical Foul
There are many different factors to consider when deciding to give a technical foul. Generally, there are three areas of coach's behavior that need attention: when a coach makes it personal, when a coach draws attention to himself or herself, and when a coach's complaints are persistent. Some technical fouls are easy. They are black and white situations that leave little room for negotiation:
• Using profanity or language that is abusive, vulgar, or obscene.
• A coach questions your integrity.
• Inciting an undesirable crowd reaction.
• A coach is embarrassing an official.
• A coach or player has been warned and has not heeded the warning.
• Leaving the confines of the coaching box and complaining.
• A coach demonstrates displeasure with your partner and their back is turned.
Other technical fouls are not as black and white. In some situations, a warning may be appropriate before the technical foul is given:
• A coach or player continually demonstrates signals or asks for calls.
• If they have interfered with the game or your concentration, then they have usually gone too far.
• If giving a technical will help give structure back to the game and if it will have a calming effect on things.

Top Ways To Give A Technical Foul
• Calling a technical foul should be no different then calling any other foul. It is simply a rule that requires a penalty. Maintain a calm attitude, have poise and presence. Don’t personalize it. Don't embarrass the coach by being demonstrative.
• Take your time. Don’t over react. Always sound the whistle and stop the clock with a foul signal. Signal the technical foul. Take a deep breath to calm yourself. Proceed to the reporting area, report the technical foul clearly to the table, and leave the area. Never look at a coach when you give a technical foul.
• Confer with your partner. If the technical foul is charged to the head coach or bench personnel, have your partner inform the coach of the loss of the coaching box.
• Explanations, it needed should be done by partner. Always explain technical fouls on players to coaches.
• Proceed with the administration of the penalty. After technical fouls, put the ball in play immediately. Because a coach has been penalized with a technical foul does not mean that the coach is allowed rebuttal time.
• Make them earn the second technical foul. Don't be reluctant to give the second technical foul if it is warranted.
• Do not discuss a technical foul or an ejection of a player or coach beyond the confines of the gymnasium. Doing so is very unethical. The penalty is enough.
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  #7 (permalink)  
Old Sun Feb 24, 2008, 02:22pm
Huck Finn
 
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Billy Mac, do you really stop the clock with a foul signal?
I think it is easier said than done to remain calm. Calling a foul and counting a basket is a normal occurance, but do officials always remain calm when doing this? No.
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Old Sun Feb 24, 2008, 02:41pm
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Good Questions ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by tomegun
Billy Mac, do you really stop the clock with a foul signal?
I think it is easier said than done to remain calm. Calling a foul and counting a basket is a normal occurrence, but do officials always remain calm when doing this? No.
I only use a stop the clock signal before a technical foul when the clock is moving.

You're right about the calm part. Our former board interpreter used to say that, "We usually call technical fouls when we're pissed". "Pissed" is one good antonym of calm, but others include agitated, excited, charged up, discomposed, angry, furious, raging, wild, etc., all things that we, as officials should not be, or try not to be, to the best of our ability, during a game. Again, you're right, all officials don't always remain calm when calling a technical foul, but, somehow, the best officials do, and we should all strive do be better officials.
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Old Sun Feb 24, 2008, 03:13pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rgncjn
Would anybody consider this to be a disqualifying foul?

Yes, this is by definition a flagrant technical foul.

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  #10 (permalink)  
Old Sun Feb 24, 2008, 04:17pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BillyMac
I only use a stop the clock signal before a technical foul when the clock is moving.

You're right about the calm part. Our former board interpreter used to say that, "We usually call technical fouls when we're pissed". "Pissed" is one good antonym of calm, but others include agitated, excited, charged up, discomposed, angry, furious, raging, wild, etc., all things that we, as officials should not be, or try not to be, to the best of our ability, during a game. Again, you're right, all officials don't always remain calm when calling a technical foul, but, somehow, the best officials do, and we should all strive do be better officials.
OK, I noticed you said (in your list) you call a technical foul by first giving the foul signal.

I don't really get pissed when I call a technical foul because what is done isn't really something I take personally. I know from playing that this is an emotional game and player/coaches react accordingly. They want everything to go their way and when it doesn't, they react in such a way that they earn a T. Whether it is unsporting conduct or haning on the rim, they do it because in the end they want to win the game.

I have a question concerning T's, if you gave a coach or someone on the bench a T and the coach wanted to ask you a question while the other team is shooting the technical foul shots, would you go over? This happened to me the other night and I wouldn't go over - something I've done in the past and will do again. My thinking is this: if the coach knows what happened before a T, what is there to gain by going over to the coach immediately following? This is different, to me at least, than a player on the court receiving a T and the coach doesn't know what happened. BTW, when I made my way in front of the coach during the normal rotation, he didn't have anything to say. More of the story: the coach was clapping his hands and yelling at my partners during the first half. I thought this was going on but didn't verify it until halftime. I went straight to the coach and asked him to stop. He admitted to doing it and proceeded to talk about judgment calls. Later in the second half, I'm standing in front of him and one of my partners says something about the players talking. The assistant coach is running his mouth too. The coach says the players have the right to talk if they think they are getting fouled. I said, "Coach, they are students, they shouldn't be saying anything." After the conversation was done, the assistant thought he should have a parting shot as I walk away...T! Later on, my other partner calls a foul and the player yells, "Bullsh!t." I call a T and apparently the player acted like he was going to throw the ball at me behind my back. My partner gives him another T. The coach was trying to talk to this player and the player jerked away - a good indication of this team's discipline. I sent this information to the state assigner, because it is the playoffs (also because I'm going to state and don't want to seem like a gun slinger ), and the only thing he asked was if the player and coach stayed around too long. Shoot, if I would have known I had that kind of support from the state I would have called more Ts The player also went into the locker room seemingly alone. The team lost the consolation game last night so they will not be going to state.
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Old Sun Feb 24, 2008, 05:14pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tomegun
Billy Mac, do you really stop the clock with a foul signal?
I think it is easier said than done to remain calm. Calling a foul and counting a basket is a normal occurance, but do officials always remain calm when doing this? No.
I think this is my biggest challenge. When I first call the "T". I blow, make the "T" signal with my hands, I explain to the table what has happened, then go to my partner/s that when my adrenaline kicks in. ( about 5 seconds ) I hate that feeling. i want to remain calm, but it's hard. JMO.

I know we should move away from the coach, but I don't have a problem explaining why I called the "T" last week a coach asked and I explained and my partners moved me away. I understood what they we doing. He was chirping for the start and I had given him the stop sign and he continued. I wasn't going to listen to it.
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Old Sun Feb 24, 2008, 06:11pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Terrapins Fan
I think this is my biggest challenge. When I first call the "T". I blow, make the "T" signal with my hands, I explain to the table what has happened, then go to my partner/s that when my adrenaline kicks in. ( about 5 seconds ) I hate that feeling. i want to remain calm, but it's hard. JMO.

I know we should move away from the coach, but I don't have a problem explaining why I called the "T" last week a coach asked and I explained and my partners moved me away. I understood what they we doing. He was chirping for the start and I had given him the stop sign and he continued. I wasn't going to listen to it.
I don't totally understand what you are saying. Did you call the T on the coach, bench or for a reason the coach should have known? Or, did you call the T out on the floor where the coach wouldn't have known? I feel like I must also ask, do you try to explain Ts that your partners call or talk to the coach after one of your partners gives him/her a T (except to tell them they must be seated)?
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Old Sun Feb 24, 2008, 09:37pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tomegun
I don't totally understand what you are saying. Did you call the T on the coach, bench or for a reason the coach should have known? Or, did you call the T out on the floor where the coach wouldn't have known? I feel like I must also ask, do you try to explain Ts that your partners call or talk to the coach after one of your partners gives him/her a T (except to tell them they must be seated)?
I "T"ed up the coach. I was becoming lead and called the "T" and walked past him to report the foul and told my partners. Coach asked for an explanation, I explianed briely, my partners asked me to go opposite the table.

Not my job to explain my partners "T"s or calls.
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Old Sun Feb 24, 2008, 09:50pm
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I would say the majority of the time I wouldn't explain a T on a coach. I do this because they should know why they got a T and what they really want, most of the time, is to continue arguing their point. IMO, what is done is done and only bad things can happen if I "answer their questions" at this point.

I agree you shouldn't explain your partner's calls, but you would be surprised how many officials think they should be the coach's shoulder to cry on after their partner gives the coach a T. I only have 1 word for a coach after one of my partners gives him/her a T: youmustremainseatedfortherestofthegame!
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Old Sun Feb 24, 2008, 10:16pm
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Ten Dollar Words ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by tomegun
youmustremainseatedfortherestofthegame
"He thinks I don't know the ten-dollar words. I know them all right."

Ernest Hemingway
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