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Old Thu Jan 26, 2006, 03:31pm
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What's the best way for a rookie official to find work? IOW, I'm not sure of the best way to find games to officiate. How do I make it known in my area that I'm available to work local tournaments and other games?

I joined my local officials association, but I don't think they do much scheduling for independent or AAU tournaments. (I was able to work a tournament last weekend because I knew the person running it and gave her a call.)

Any suggestions you may have on how a rookie can find work will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance,
Kerry

[Edited by kblehman on Jan 26th, 2006 at 03:58 PM]
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Old Thu Jan 26, 2006, 03:35pm
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Take out an ad in USA Today that says, "Have Whistle, Will Fly for WOrk."

Actually, sounds like you've got it figured out pretty well.
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Old Thu Jan 26, 2006, 04:03pm
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You will usually find work when people figure out you are new and you make yourself available. Once assignors and fellow officials find this out about you, then the work should come. You just cannot expect to get a license and sit and wait. You need to be proactive and contact the people that assign games and the more you prove you are reliable, they will find you some where to go.

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Old Thu Jan 26, 2006, 04:12pm
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Other officials might be able to help you find some AAU tournaments and such.
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Old Thu Jan 26, 2006, 05:53pm
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For AAU tournaments, you usually need to find out who assigns and call them directly. There is good Web site, http://www.aaubb.com/, that lists most of the AAU tournaments in the country. You can sort this by state. If you call or email the tournament director, you can ask who assigns the officials.



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Old Fri Jan 27, 2006, 08:25am
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Thank you JRutlege, Junker & BayStRef. I learned the name of one of the area assigners and gave him a call. I also told the assigner for a local facility that I'm available, and I'll continue to try and make the necessary contacts.

I had thought of calling tournament directors when tournaments are listed in the paper, but I recalled reading in my officials guide that it's best to not solicit games. But perhaps they're talking about school games.

Thanks very much for your advice.
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Old Fri Jan 27, 2006, 09:25am
Jerry Blum
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Yeah the handbook says that about not soliciting games, but depending on where you are that's how things are done. I know I moved from an area where our association scheduled games for us and am now in an area where there is a mix of assignors(most of which are other officials) and AD's scheduling their own games. Just depends on your area but don't be afraid to talk to the schools about officiating for them.
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Old Fri Jan 27, 2006, 10:53am
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Our association works a minimum of two, sometimes four games an evening, 3-man crew. Usually a boys JV/V on one night then girls JV/V on the next. A lot of our rookie refs go with a senior official and work the JV game for them. The sitting official pays the rookie a pre-determined amount for the JV game. It gets the rookie valuable time on the floor and exposes him to 3-man mechanics with very experienced people.
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Old Fri Jan 27, 2006, 11:05am
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Quote:
Originally posted by Jerry Blum
Yeah the handbook says that about not soliciting games, but depending on where you are that's how things are done. ... Just depends on your area but don't be afraid to talk to the schools about officiating for them.
Thanks Jerry. At this point, because I'm a rookie (just 9 games) I'd rather gain experience in AAU tournaments, etc, before making myself available for school games. (Although, truthfully, I've seen a few school game refs who didn't seem much better than me.)

I want to learn how to do things the right way and get comfortable with it before doing middle school or jr high games. That's why I'm looking for tournaments for now. Plus, I don't yet know the pre-game responsbilities and some of the more rigid rules (timeout horns, etc) for sanctioned school games. One thing at a time.

Anyway, I appreciate your comments. Thank you.
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Old Sat Jan 28, 2006, 07:49am
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Quote:
Originally posted by kblehman
, because I'm a rookie (just 9 games) I'd rather gain experience in AAU tournaments, etc, before making myself available for school games. (Although, truthfully, I've seen a few school game refs who didn't seem much better than me.)

I want to learn how to do things the right way ...
Anyway, I appreciate your comments. Thank you.
Great that you are looking to improve but often times these AAU and "Travel" leagues and tournaments do the exact opposite of helping with game managment. You get over zealous coaches and parents that all think their son or daughter is next coming of Jordan.

These tournaments can leave you with lots of bad habits in mechanics.

Try to add in an official's camp or two this summer. You can check with your association to find one in your area. You will get lots of instruction and guidance by experienced officials.

Don't be afraid to take those middle school games. I was a sub for a JV girls game towards the end of my first year and found it was easier to call because the play was better.

Good Luck
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Old Sat Jan 28, 2006, 11:11am
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Get in there and take some of the school games. It takes about 10 minutes of instruction to get you up to speed on all of the "formalities" regarding pre-game, horns, etc. You'll be assigned a partner that will help you through it. Don't let that stuff hold you back.
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Old Mon Jan 30, 2006, 11:16am
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[QUOTE]Originally posted by stmaryrams
Quote:
Great that you are looking to improve but often times these AAU and "Travel" leagues and tournaments do the exact opposite of helping with game managment. You get overzealous coaches and parents that all think their son or daughter is next coming of Jordan.

These tournaments can leave you with lots of bad habits in mechanics.

Try to add in an official's camp or two this summer. You can check with your association to find one in your area. You will get lots of instruction and guidance by experienced officials.

Don't be afraid to take those middle school games. I was a sub for a JV girls game towards the end of my first year and found it was easier to call because the play was better.
Good Luck
I understand your comments about the AAU and travel tournaments. I was fortunate, however, that I was paired up with guys who were doing things right and were willing to help when I did something wrong and when I asked questions. For example, one reminded me that even though we were using a running clock, to get in the habit of bringing my hand down to start it because that's how real games are done.

I'll lok into a camp, that's a great idea. Thank you.
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Old Mon Jan 30, 2006, 11:22am
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Quote:
Originally posted by Back In The Saddle
Get in there and take some of the school games. It takes about 10 minutes of instruction to get you up to speed on all of the "formalities" regarding pre-game, horns, etc. You'll be assigned a partner that will help you through it. Don't let that stuff hold you back.
My daughter plays 7th grade ball--I've seen plenty of those games and I'm confident I could call them. But the middle school & junior high games are finished in my area, so that'll have to come next year. By then I'll have more experience and be more comfortable with the striped shirt on. And it's good to know the "formalities" aren't as daunting as they seem. Thanks for your encouragement.
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