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Old Wed Jan 11, 2006, 03:47pm
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I'm a 5 yr high school referee and am still learning. This year I am working on management of coaches and players on the court. What I've learned so far is that coaches are going to make comments. I think its ok to let them vent to you when you are running by. Sometimes a response is warrented, sometimes not. IF coaches' comments are rude and loud enough for others to hear, you should probably address it with a warning at least. Warnings early on, if warrented, prevent problems from building up later in the game. Let me know what you all think about this way of dealing with coaches.
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Old Wed Jan 11, 2006, 04:12pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by CaliOne
I'm a 5 yr high school referee and am still learning. This year I am working on management of coaches and players on the court. What I've learned so far is that coaches are going to make comments. I think its ok to let them vent to you when you are running by. Sometimes a response is warrented, sometimes not. IF coaches' comments are rude and loud enough for others to hear, you should probably address it with a warning at least. Warnings early on, if warrented, prevent problems from building up later in the game. Let me know what you all think about this way of dealing with coaches.
What a coincidence - I was a 5 yr high school student and I'm still learning as well.

You're probably on the right track, but let me throw in a couple of comments, fwiw. First, people skills are important. How you communicate with coaches goes a long way in how they communicate with you. I usually don't address "comments". Questions are fine, as long as they are addressed in a respectful manner, and I have the time and ability to answer them. If a coach starts yelling their questions, see if you can get next to them and talk to them in a calm, quiet voice, so they start to talk quieter as well. Answer their questions truthfully; if you missed a call, admit it. (Do NOT do that too often, however. )

Your one comment that bothered me a little was warnings (plural) early on prevent problems later in the game. I think there should be really only one warning. Try to talk a coach out of getting stupid, but if that doesn't work, give them the "stop sign" warning. If they continue with the same behavior, give them the T. Don't give them multiple warnings; that just shows you don't have the guts to actually give them the T when they deserve it.

Godd luck, and keep working at it.
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Old Wed Jan 11, 2006, 04:33pm
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Think of a coach that continuously complains/questions as a pressure valve. If you continue to talk to him at the appropriate times, you will release some pressure to keep his head from blowing clean off his body. On second thought, don't say a word to him and make sure the camera gets it all on tape.
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Old Wed Jan 11, 2006, 05:17pm
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I laughed a lot when I read that last post..a lot! Thanks for the advice, it is helpful.
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Old Wed Jan 11, 2006, 05:23pm
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Coaches want: (1) to vent; (2) information. More of 1 than 2. For 2, give it to them when they ask for it. As mentioned above, use the "Stop" sign and then the T. I say,
"That's enough, coach," when I give the stop sign.
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Old Wed Jan 11, 2006, 05:23pm
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I agree with what was said earlier. One warning is more than enough. If you keep warning and never do anything about it, you're just inviting them to ride you. Also, I always make sure to stress sportsmanship first and foremost in the pregame meeting. Remember that you don't "give" a T, you assess one when when it is earned (or assess two...three....how ever many it takes).
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Old Wed Jan 11, 2006, 05:40pm
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Our commish says "an appropriate question will be answered at the appropriate time in the appropriate manner." I love that. I even tell coaches that with a smile in our pregame meeting, "You know I'll always answer an appropriate question at the appropriate time in the appropriate manner. Of course, when I am sprinting back to cover the fast break probably isnt the approrpiate time for us to discuss the call you think I just missed. [smile]." That gets a laugh.

I usually also remind them that if they think there is a time, score, AP or other correctable error (that is correctable under 2-10) to call a time out and we can discuss it and if they are right they dont lose the time out. (you'd be surprised how many coaches dont know this, rule 5-8-4 and 5-11-3(b)). I remind them of this because sometimes we do make mistakes. And I'd hate for a coach to wind up with a T because he or she was frustrated with a mistake I made.
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Old Wed Jan 11, 2006, 06:01pm
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The phrase that I was taught to use when the coach is whining about traveling, fouls, etc., is:

"Coach, I hear you."

This sends two messages:

a) I'm not ignoring you and I hear what you are saying.
b) I don't want to hear any more.

Just make sure you are ready to back it up if the coach chooses not to stop.
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Old Wed Jan 11, 2006, 06:55pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by ChrisSportsFan
Think of a coach that continuously complains/questions as a pressure valve. If you continue to talk to him at the appropriate times, you will release some pressure to keep his head from blowing clean off his body. On second thought, don't say a word to him and make sure the camera gets it all on tape.
Is that similar to when the grammar guy's head exploded in that other recent thread?:O
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Old Wed Jan 11, 2006, 09:49pm
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Andy just posted a really good point which I don't think anyone touched on.

Coaches want to be heard! Tell them that you are listening when they comment or are begging for a call. If you tell them you hear them then they won't have to keep yelling about it...hypothetically speaking of course.
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Old Thu Jan 12, 2006, 02:16pm
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Coaches absolutely want to be heard!!!!

Here's my mindset when dealing w/ a coach:

I will primarily only respond to a question (some comments cannot go ignored). As for my progression to giving a T - 1) "I hear you Coach"; 2) "I'll look for it Coach"; 3) "Coach, that's enough (STOP SIGN). Now let me work"; 4)then TECH.

You can skip any step, if needed. The "Stop Sign" is great because it is a demonstrative way for everyone (rest of crew AND supervisor watching the game on tape) to see your warning. Remember, the "Stop Sign" is your "line in the sand" - be prepared to penalize if crossed.

By the way, IMO, your game management abilities are what separate you from other officials and will play a large role in your advancement to the next level.
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