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Old Fri Nov 11, 2005, 09:44am
fan fan is offline
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I know the lane spaces adjacent to the end line shall be occupied by an opponent of the free thrower on a personal foul. However, If teammates of the free thrower choose not to take the next available lane spaces can the other team occupy them or will they remain vacant?
I am also trying to figure out the total area of a marked lane space. How far back does the lane space go? I am a little confused in the rule book (NF) where is says that a player occupying a marked lane space may not have either foot beyond the vertical pane of any edge of the space designated by the neutral zone. I am not sure what is the neutral zone?

Thanks

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Old Fri Nov 11, 2005, 09:57am
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Lane spaces are set up to be 3 feet by 3 feet. The defense must occupy the two bottom spaces (unless the lane is cleared for any reason). The next two spaces MAY be occupied by teammates of the player shooting the free throw. No more than two teammates of the shooter may be on the line. If any of the teammates of the shooter choose not to be on the line, that spot MAY be fill by a defensive player. The defense is limited to a minimum of 2 and a maximum of 4 players along the lane while the offense has a minimum of 0 and a maximum of 2 along the lane.

Review rule 8-1 (all articles), 9-1 (all articles), 1-5-2.
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Old Fri Nov 11, 2005, 10:30am
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Quote:
Originally posted by fan
I am not sure what is the neutral zone?
First of all, it's nice to have a fan that is interested in learning the rules. Mind if I ask why you're asking about such detailed stuff? Have you been asked to ref in your kid's youth league or something like that? I'm just curious, but whatever your reason, you came to the right place.

Second, to answer your question, the neutral zone is what most people call "the block". It's the space between the lowest lane space and the next lane space.
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Old Fri Nov 11, 2005, 10:44am
fan fan is offline
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Actually, I am "novice" assistant coach for 11 and 12 year olds in which officals are known to not to show on occassion. I really like this site. It is very informative.
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Old Fri Nov 11, 2005, 10:54am
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That's awesome, fan. Knowing the rules will only help you as a coach, too. Glad we can help.
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Old Sat Nov 12, 2005, 01:08pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by ChuckElias
That's awesome, fan. Knowing the rules will only help you as a coach, too. Glad we can help.
Parents don't always agree, but teaching kids to play within the rules gives them an enormous advantage. Both in the game itself and in the discipline that can be carried over into other part of their lives, seeing the boundaries of the situation, and learning to creatively work within them is a huge benefit you are giving your players.

That's my story and I'm sticking to it!
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Old Sun Nov 13, 2005, 03:15am
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fan, I wish more coaches were like you. I'm always happy to explain a rule to a coach but I am shocked at how often they just dont know some simple things. [My current pet peeve being how some coaches seem to be coaching the setting of screens. I mean, the rules are pretty clear, if coaches would just consult them.] I appreciate you being here. Even officials debate rules and meanings all the time. But it is great to see you getting the basics to help coach your team.
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Old Wed Nov 16, 2005, 07:17am
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I have a recomendation to you if you want to be a good coach, learn to officiate. You don't need to be great, or even that good, but if you can call rules on your trainings and understand why you get the calls against you, you'll go free from many unnessecary protest T's for you and your players.

And you've sure found a good site for info
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