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Old Thu Jan 06, 2000, 05:42pm
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Player is ready to make a throw in from a designated spot out of bounds. If he stays within the 3 foot wide throw in area, can he:
1) jump up and come down with the ball;
2) dribble the ball (either once or more than once, stopping between dribbles)while out of bounds?
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Old Thu Jan 06, 2000, 09:45pm
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As long as the thrower in is stil within the 3 foot area, they can do what ever they want, junp up and down....get on their knees, turn in circles...what ever. As far as dribbleing the ball, If memory serves me right that is ok as well...I don't have my books with me.
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Old Thu Jan 06, 2000, 11:16pm
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John:

Dennis is right. As long as the inbounder is within the 3-foot restriction, he/she can dribble the ball on the out of bounds area before making the throw-in. However, should the inbounder BOUNCE PASS the ball to a teammate with the pass striking the floor out of bounds first, it is a violation. Good luck.

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Old Thu Jan 06, 2000, 11:22pm
KDM KDM is offline
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quote:
Originally posted by John Choiniere on 01-06-2000 04:42 PM
Player is ready to make a throw in from a designated spot out of bounds. If he stays within the 3 foot wide throw in area, can he:
1) jump up and come down with the ball;
2) dribble the ball (either once or more than once, stopping between dribbles)while out of bounds?


John,

Number 1 is yes since the pivot foot restrictions and the traveling rule are not in effect for a throw-in, as long as the thrower keeps one foot on or over the spot until the ball is released.

Number 2 is uncertain. But, I think the thrower must release the ball on a pass directly onto the court. The only exception, may be after an awarded goal (including goaltending and basket interference and free throw) where the direct pass may be a pass along the end line to a teammate outside the boundary.

But if it is legal (Number 2), if he dribbled once and caught it and quickly dribbled again, would it be double dribble? This is why I think its illegal.

KDM
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Old Fri Jan 07, 2000, 01:18am
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KDM,
#1 - correct.

#2 - incorrect. As long as the player does not bounce the ball out of bounds first on its way onto the court where it is touched, a player may bounce the ball during a throw-in.

Just as we do not give the traveling signal if the player does move, we would not give a double dribble signal for his action of dribbling the ball, catching it, and dribbling the ball again.

On Wednesday night, I had a game in a gym with only 18 inches of out-of-bounds space at the endlines. Needless to say whenever a player had a designated spot throw-in it was very difficult to get it past the defender. (The home school has chosen not to use a 3 foot restraining line since they are used to the small confines of the court).

On two or three occasions we had players moving their feet to make the throw in. But never did they go outside the 3 foot area. But one of the coaches insisted that the player was restricted to a single pivot foot while throwing the ball in. This was the first time a coach had ever used this on me and at first I thought he was kidding. But he said that in 'last weeks game' another 'official' told him this was the rule.

Needless to say we did not call violations.
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Old Sat Jan 08, 2000, 12:02am
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Silliman:

I agree and have been there.

I mentioned this pet peeve of mine in another thread. It seems that the reason some coaches have this misconception is because some officials DO SIGNAL a travel when they really have a throw-in violation.

Sometimes we are our own worst enemies.

[This message has been edited by Todd (Mike) Mullen (edited January 07, 2000).]
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Old Sat Jan 08, 2000, 01:12am
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quote:
Originally posted by John Choiniere on 01-06-2000 04:42 PM

2) dribble the ball (either once or more than once, stopping between dribbles)while out of bounds?


I am not sure of the rule, but I don't think I'll allow a dribble, because I would interpret that "release" as a pass that did not go directly inbounds.
mick

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Old Sat Jan 08, 2000, 03:56am
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quote:
Originally posted by mick on 01-08-2000 12:12 AM
I am not sure of the rule, but I don't think I'll allow a dribble, because I would interpret that "release" as a pass that did not go directly inbounds.
mick




Guys - you can dribble the ball OOB as many times as you want on any throwin, spot or running, as long as you throw the ball toward the court within 5 seconds. Remember, there is no player (or team) control during a throwin, so the only violations you can have are those outlined under the throwin section of the rulebook. If you rule that a dribble was a "release, but not toward the court" you would be the only ref in history to do so.

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Old Sat Jan 08, 2000, 04:09pm
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One of the "Basketball Rules Fundamentals" is that "neither the dribble nor traveling rule operates during the jump ball, throw-in, or free throw." To call an illegal dribble or traveling on a throw-in would be incorrect.
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Old Mon Jan 10, 2000, 03:06pm
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If you rule that a dribble was a "release, but not toward the court" you would be the only ref in history to do so.

[/quote]

Mark,
If a kid starts to pass and pulls the string and it does/doesn't get outside the 3' spot, though it left his hand, then he can retrieve it (still remaining in the designated spot) and throw it in?
mick


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