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Old Wed Jun 22, 2005, 03:57pm
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I've noticed a lot of officials saying this prior to handing the ball to the thrower on a throwin. Is this a college mechanic or what? Do you guys say "play" before handing the ball? Just curious, should I start doing it?
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Old Wed Jun 22, 2005, 04:00pm
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I've heard guys say it, too. It's not a college mechanic. It's just something they picked up. I always say "Spot!" or "You can run" before handing/bouncing the ball to the inbounder. But that's just me; again, not an official mechanic.
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Old Wed Jun 22, 2005, 04:08pm
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I've never said it, and most of the refs I work with don't say it either. I have heard some say it, but only in a context of many different things going on before a throw-in, such as coming out after a time-out, there's a question at the table, then a kid's shoe needs to be tied, a small child runs out on the floor with a parent running after it, and the band is finishing the last verse of In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida. I've heard some say "Play!" almost in the context of, "Let's get this going; I'm tired of standing here!". But as usual practice, I don't believe it's something that needs to be done. However, as mentioned many times before, if a supervisor or assignor wants you to do it, then you will do it.
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Old Wed Jun 22, 2005, 04:11pm
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I'm talking about officials saying this on every throw-in in the front court. I agree that after a break (like the ones you cited) we should make the players aware that we're bout to start again, that is why I blow my whistle and then hand the ball away.
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Old Wed Jun 22, 2005, 04:42pm
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Blowing the whistle coming in from a long delay (timeouts, injury, multiple subs, scorer's table issues) is the recognized mechanic by the Fed. Some guys that I have worked with in higher level games also blow the whistle on a baseline inbound staying in the frontcourt. I don't know if this is the official mechanic for NCAA/NBA, but when in rome....
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Old Wed Jun 22, 2005, 05:17pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by M&M Guy
the band is finishing the last verse of In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida.
After Bart has switched the church organist's sheet music, she is frantically playing In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida.

Homer leans over to Marge and says slyly, "Remember when we used to make out to this hymn?"

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Old Wed Jun 22, 2005, 05:37pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by ChuckElias
Quote:
Originally posted by M&M Guy
the band is finishing the last verse of In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida.
After Bart has switched the church organist's sheet music, she is frantically playing In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida.

Homer leans over to Marge and says slyly, "Remember when we used to make out to this hymn?"

"In the Garden of Eden, babyeee."
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Old Wed Jun 22, 2005, 05:42pm
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To answer the question, I usually say, "Spot or you can run," for the thrower, and a ,"Straight up," for the defender.

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Old Wed Jun 22, 2005, 06:07pm
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I do this. I'm not sure where I picked it up. But it simply lets the players (some of whom may not be looking toward the thrower) that the ball is coming in.
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Old Wed Jun 22, 2005, 06:23pm
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I've always used, "Here you go" before handing the ball to the thrower and may precede that with, "Are you ready?"

IMO, I've never liked "Play" because while it might be a quick saying, it sounds too curt to me and I want to sound more approachable.

Similarly, I say, "You have the full baseline" or "Remember, you have to stay in that spot."

Just like how I wouldn't want a kid using one or two word lines on me, I try to use full sentences because it really doesn't take that much longer, it's more respectable and is a little step that I think builds more rapport.
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Old Wed Jun 22, 2005, 06:38pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by Snake~eyes
I'm talking about officials saying this on every throw-in in the front court. I agree that after a break (like the ones you cited) we should make the players aware that we're bout to start again, that is why I blow my whistle and then hand the ball away.
In NCAA-W, the mechanic is for the L to blow their whistle before a throw-in in the front court. And, as mentioned, it is a Fed. mechanic to blow the whistle after a delay of some sort before any throw-in. As far as saying something before every throw-in, I've been told to not draw attention to yourself by doing those types of things, such as saying something before every throw-in, and going "tweet, tweet, tweet" with the whistle instead of one, authoritative blast. (I was told that by some rockin' robin...apologies to the younger crowd...) It just appears, for lack of a better way of putting it, less professional, especially in the higher levels. If other officials in your area aren't doing it, then it does draw a little unnecessary attention to yourself because you're doing it differently. Of course, if it is standard in your area, by all means do it. I would think it's also acceptable at lower levels, because you almost as much a teacher as a referee. But I've found as I go to camps, these are the little, seemingly unnecessary habits that I had picked up over time and had to "unlearn" to make me look more professional overall.
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Old Wed Jun 22, 2005, 07:23pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by blindzebra
I usually say, "Spot or you can run," for the thrower,
If you say "Spot or you can run", how does he know which one he can do?
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Old Wed Jun 22, 2005, 07:27pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by Dribble
Similarly, I say, "You have the full baseline"
I used to say, "You have the whole baseline" until one kid said to me in a panic, "I have to hold here?!?!" So now I just say "You can run" or "Spot".

Quote:
Just like how I wouldn't want a kid using one or two word lines on me, I try to use full sentences because it really doesn't take that much longer, it's more respectable and is a little step that I think builds more rapport.
I'm not too concerned with building rapport in these situations. I'm more concerned with being able to say to the coach, "Coach, I told him he had to stay" after calling a violation.
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Old Wed Jun 22, 2005, 07:48pm
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An especially loud whistle before a throw-in is also a useful mechanic, I've found, when in small gyms with yappy parents sitting on the sidelines.

BTW, before FC throw-ins, I always say "IN" - and use a short whistle after delays of any kind.

I seem to recall some disagreement on another thread a while back on whether to tell a player they "have the whole baseline" or not. I usually do - something short, like "WHOLE BASELINE" or "ON THE SPOT".
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Old Wed Jun 22, 2005, 08:29pm
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I normally say, you may run the baseline. This is your spot.
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