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Old Mon Mar 22, 2004, 10:16am
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Situation #5 this weekend.

If player A1 is about to inbounds the ball and he is being defended by B1, does B1 have to back up to allow three feet if A1 has room to back up? I say no. If A1 has room to back up then B1 can be right at the line without coming over. I would only require a defender to back up if the thrower had nowhere to go because of court conditions. Is there a rule on this?
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Old Mon Mar 22, 2004, 10:22am
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See NFHS rule 7-6-3- "the opponent(s) of the thrower shall not have any part of his/her person through the inbounds side of the throw-in boundary line until the ball has been released on a throw-in pass".
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Old Mon Mar 22, 2004, 10:54am
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As for tight spaces, you can refer to . . .

Rule #1: Court and Equipment
SECTION 2 SIDELINES, END LINES
ART. 2 . . . If, on an unofficial court, there is less than 3 feet of unobstructed space outside any sideline or end line, a narrow broken line shall be marked on the court parallel with and 3 feet inside that boundary. This restraining line becomes the boundary line during a throw-in on that side or end, as in 7-6. It continues to be the boundary until the ball crosses the line.
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Old Mon Mar 22, 2004, 12:45pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by footlocker
Situation #5 this weekend.

If player A1 is about to inbounds the ball and he is being defended by B1, does B1 have to back up to allow three feet if A1 has room to back up? I say no. If A1 has room to back up then B1 can be right at the line without coming over. I would only require a defender to back up if the thrower had nowhere to go because of court conditions. Is there a rule on this?
You are correct. A1 gets a minimum of 3 feet forward and backward. If it isn't there behind her, you require the defense to allow it infront of her.

Here's a question I'm not sure about the answer to. How far up and down the sideline does that backing up apply? Can A1's teammate stand right next to the defender, but maybe one step closer to the line? Can A2 stand right next to the line if she's five or six feet down the line from A1? Is the new, temporary inbounds line parallel to the sideline and runs the length, or is it an arc, the inbounder being the center, and the radius being 3 feet?
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Old Mon Mar 22, 2004, 12:48pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by Hawks Coach
As for tight spaces, you can refer to . . .

Rule #1: Court and Equipment
SECTION 2 SIDELINES, END LINES
ART. 2 . . . If, on an unofficial court, there is less than 3 feet of unobstructed space outside any sideline or end line, a narrow broken line shall be marked on the court parallel with and 3 feet inside that boundary. This restraining line becomes the boundary line during a throw-in on that side or end, as in 7-6. It continues to be the boundary until the ball crosses the line.
AHHHH, yes, the restraining line. It just ain't basketball in NW Kansas without the restraining line!
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Old Mon Mar 22, 2004, 12:51pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by footlocker
Situation #5 this weekend.
You had a very busy weekend!
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Old Mon Mar 22, 2004, 12:52pm
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Juulie,
As the rule reads, the restraining line is supposed to be put down as a dashed line on the court, running the length of the sideline or endline where space is constrained. In reality, I have been places where refs do the soccer thing and back a defender up to an imaginary line (usually more than three feet!).

But by rule, if you read the reference, the restraining line is the boundary line for the inbounds play until the ball crosses the restraining line. So it works just like the reall OOB line, not a 3 foot arc.
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Old Mon Mar 22, 2004, 12:55pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by Hawks Coach
But by rule, if you read the reference, the restraining line is the boundary line for the inbounds play until the ball crosses the restraining line. So it works just like the reall OOB line, not a 3 foot arc.
I see your point. But on floors where it is laid down (which isn't very many, I might add) it doesn't run the full length, so is it open to interpretation? I wouldn't be personally in favor of an arc, that's not why I'm arguing. Just want to have some certainty when it becomes an issue sometime in the future.
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Old Mon Mar 22, 2004, 01:17pm
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Julie, I'd say go with the line as per the restraining line rule.

If, however, you were to go with an arc, just remember that it would have to be a somewhat modified arc - what with the three foot "spot" for the inbounder. I think it's just easier to give the three feet the whole way (on a normal court, the defender can't cross the OOB line to block the pass if he's downcourt), with a reasonable exception for players 10-20 feet or more downcourt.
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Old Mon Mar 22, 2004, 01:20pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by rainmaker

Here's a question I'm not sure about the answer to. How far up and down the sideline does that backing up apply? Can A1's teammate stand right next to the defender, but maybe one step closer to the line? Can A2 stand right next to the line if she's five or six feet down the line from A1? Is the new, temporary inbounds line parallel to the sideline and runs the length, or is it an arc, the inbounder being the center, and the radius being 3 feet?
It runs the length of the court. If an offensive player enters this area, the defense is also allowed to enter the area.
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Old Mon Mar 22, 2004, 01:21pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by Mark Dexter
Julie, I'd say go with the line as per the restraining line rule.

If, however, you were to go with an arc, just remember that it would have to be a somewhat modified arc - what with the three foot "spot" for the inbounder. I think it's just easier to give the three feet the whole way (on a normal court, the defender can't cross the OOB line to block the pass if he's downcourt), with a reasonable exception for players 10-20 feet or more downcourt.
Okay, that seems like how I've seen it done and how it makes sense. It was the 10-20 feet distance that I was wondering about, and the restraining line does seem unenforceable that far away..

What's really, really tough is playing on one of those 55 foot floors where there are three different possible division lines, depending on which way you're going and how far you've gotten. Only done that once and I hope I NEVER have to do it again. YUCH!!
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Old Mon Mar 22, 2004, 03:35pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by bob jenkins
[It runs the length of the court. If an offensive player enters this area, the defense is also allowed to enter the area.
No player is allowed in the area until the ball breaks the plane. This includes a bounce pass that hits the line.

It only pertains to the side/end line that you are inbounding the ball in. It gets tricky because if A steps in, it is simply a violation. If B steps in, it is a warning first and a technical (to the violating player) from then on out.

Question - If A accidentally bumps B into the restrained area, what do you have? A foul on A? A Tech on B? A violation on A? I think I would say, "it depends." Or refer to the 'spirit of the rule' and have a violation on A. Any thoughts?

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Old Mon Mar 22, 2004, 03:45pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by FHSUref
Quote:
Originally posted by footlocker
Situation #5 this weekend.
You had a very busy weekend!
Yes, 13 games, different partners, club basketball- a lot can happen.
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Old Mon Mar 22, 2004, 03:48pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by footlocker
Quote:
Originally posted by FHSUref
Quote:
Originally posted by footlocker
Situation #5 this weekend.
You had a very busy weekend!
Yes, 13 games, different partners, club basketball- a lot can happen.
The good thing is that it is all over! I don't know how I would have handled it.
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Old Mon Mar 22, 2004, 04:21pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by FHSUref
Quote:
Originally posted by bob jenkins
[It runs the length of the court. If an offensive player enters this area, the defense is also allowed to enter the area.
No player is allowed in the area until the ball breaks the plane. This includes a bounce pass that hits the line.
Take a look at 7.6.3.D: "B1 is expected to stay back one step unless the throw-in is attempted between this area and the boundary line. No violation in this case as B1 is allowed to defend this area if the throw-in is attempted there." (Emphasis mine)
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