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Old Thu Feb 12, 2004, 11:56pm
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NCAA - what is the rule book definition of a jump stop?

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Old Fri Feb 13, 2004, 08:50am
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Quote:
Originally posted by dhodges007
NCAA - what is the rule book definition of a jump stop?

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There is none.

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Old Fri Feb 13, 2004, 10:06am
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Bob's right. There's no definition of "jump stop" in the rulebook. But coaches and officials talk about the jump stop all the time and there are two very different ways of defining the it. The first, more general way, to understand it is anytime a player jumps, then catches the ball (either catches a pass or picks up his own dribble) and then comes to a complete stop when he lands.

The more specific definition has to do with when a player catches the ball in the air, and then lands on one foot. In that case, he may jump off that foot and land simultaneously on both feet. This is what I always mean by "jump stop" (except in my first paragraph above ).

Here's what Hank Nichols has to say on the subject in the most recent Official's Bulletin (from 2/10/04):

Quote:
Jump Stop. Last year the jump stop was officiated well and consistently; consequently, it removed existing confusion as to what was legal. This year there appears to be an inconsistent understanding of Rule 4-65.3 and as a consequence, the rule is not being officiated correctly.


As a reminder, when a dribbling player initiates a jump, ends his dribble with both feet off the floor and lands simultaneously on two feet (jump stop), he is permitted to establish a pivot foot. When there is doubt as to how many feet were off the floor when the dribble ended, the official shall assume that the dribble ended with both feet off the floor (which is most often the case); consequently, the player, after executing the jump stop, is allowed to establish a pivot foot. When the official does not allow the player to pivot after a jump stop, he shall be absolutely sure that player ended his dribble with only one foot off the floor.
Hope that helps.
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Old Fri Feb 13, 2004, 12:04pm
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Thanks. At the HS level you can't move either foot after a "jump stop" from a dribble - right?
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Old Fri Feb 13, 2004, 12:06pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by dhodges007
Thanks. At the HS level you can't move either foot after a "jump stop" from a dribble - right?
Wrong.

The travelling rule is (at least essentially) the same as the NCAA rule. Hank Nicholl's memo provides good guidance for FED as well.

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Old Fri Feb 13, 2004, 12:11pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by dhodges007
Thanks. At the HS level you can't move either foot after a "jump stop" from a dribble - right?
The rules regarding whether the player has a pivot have nothing to do with whether the move is part of a dribble or a pass.

The determining factor is what happens after the airborne player catches the ball.

1) If s/he lands on both feet simultaneously, then either foot may be the pivot.

2) If s/he lands on one foot followed by the other, then only the first foot to touch the ground may be the pivot.

3) If s/he lands on one foot, then jumps and lands on both feet simultaneously, then neither foot may be the pivot.
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Old Tue Feb 17, 2004, 01:01pm
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Yeah but....

"3) If s/he lands on one foot, then jumps and lands on both feet simultaneously, then neither foot may be the pivot."

The player can leave the ground for a shot attempt right?
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Old Tue Feb 17, 2004, 01:07pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by lrpalmer3
The player can leave the ground for a shot attempt right?
Absolutely. In all 3 of the above cases, a player may jump to pass or shoot.
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