The Official Forum  

Go Back   The Official Forum > Basketball

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)  
Old Tue Jan 06, 2004, 06:53pm
Official Forum Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 126
Send a message via AIM to PAT THE REF
Exclamation

What do you think about the call on the red light situation last night? The referee's took over 10 minutes to view the monitor to see if the shot actually was made in time. The problem was that the clock said 00.0 but the red light had not gone on yet. They ruled that since the red light had not gone on yet that the shot was good and texas won.

Article: http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/column...ndy&id=1701248

What would you have done? Also who's fault is it?
__________________
Pat The Ref
Reply With Quote
  #2 (permalink)  
Old Tue Jan 06, 2004, 08:16pm
In Memoriam
 
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: Houghton, U.P., Michigan
Posts: 9,953
Quote:
Originally posted by PAT THE REF
What do you think about the call on the red light situation last night? The referee's took over 10 minutes to view the monitor to see if the shot actually was made in time. The problem was that the clock said 00.0 but the red light had not gone on yet. They ruled that since the red light had not gone on yet that the shot was good and texas won.

Article: http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/column...ndy&id=1701248

What would you have done? Also who's fault is it?
Makes sense to me.
Speed of electricity (186,000 mps?) is quicker than a blink of the eye.
I guess Texas is not just good, but lucky, too.
mick
Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old Tue Jan 06, 2004, 09:28pm
Official Forum Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: Just north of hell
Posts: 9,250
Send a message via AIM to Dan_ref


http://www.officialforum.com/thread/11528
Reply With Quote
  #4 (permalink)  
Old Wed Jan 07, 2004, 11:06am
Official Forum Member
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Posts: 4,801
You go by the horn, then the light, THEN the clock (because some clocks can really be at 0.01 - 0.09 seconds and show 0.0)

On some clocks, stopping the clock (for a whistle) when the horn is on can shut the horn off (dumb - but it's what some of us have to deal with). In that case, it's easier to see a light on a replay rather than hear a very short horn (especially true if the replay has no sound).
__________________
"To win the game is great. To play the game is greater. But to love the game is the greatest of all."
Reply With Quote
  #5 (permalink)  
Old Wed Jan 07, 2004, 11:08am
Official Forum Member
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Posts: 4,801
BTW, since, by rule, the game has not ended, the team scored upon gets the ball for an inbounds with 0.0 on the clock. Good luck with the tip in that situation.
__________________
"To win the game is great. To play the game is greater. But to love the game is the greatest of all."
Reply With Quote
  #6 (permalink)  
Old Wed Jan 07, 2004, 01:15pm
Official Forum Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Lincoln Co, Missouri
Posts: 823
I didn't see the play, but I would assume that since the discussion was whether the ball was released from the hand between the time the clock showed 0:00.0 and the red light came on that the red light indeed would of came on by the time the ball entered the basket, therefore the game would be over as there is no time left, wouldn't it?
Reply With Quote
  #7 (permalink)  
Old Wed Jan 07, 2004, 02:31pm
In Memoriam
 
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: Houghton, U.P., Michigan
Posts: 9,953
Lightbulb The shot lives if released in time.

Quote:
Originally posted by eyezen
I didn't see the play, but I would assume that since the discussion was whether the ball was released from the hand between the time the clock showed 0:00.0 and the red light came on that the red light indeed would of came on by the time the ball entered the basket, therefore the game would be over as there is no time left, wouldn't it?
eyezen,
The shot, while in the air after it has left the hand, gets a chance to count whether, or not, the horn goes off and/or the light comes on.
Yes, the officials were looking to make sure the shot was in the air and off the hand.
mick
Reply With Quote
  #8 (permalink)  
Old Wed Jan 07, 2004, 02:38pm
Official Forum Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Lincoln Co, Missouri
Posts: 823
Yes I understand that. My question is to the post above me.

quote Mark Dexter:

BTW, since, by rule, the game has not ended, the team scored upon gets the ball for an inbounds with 0.0 on the clock. Good luck with the tip in that situation.

Is he refering to the clock stopping when the ball goes in under a minute in the second half?

If so, I'm saying that the clock runs out while the ball is in flight.

Maybe I'm missing something? I was confused by this statement and what rule he was refering to.




Reply With Quote
  #9 (permalink)  
Old Wed Jan 07, 2004, 03:53pm
In Memoriam
 
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: Houghton, U.P., Michigan
Posts: 9,953
Quote:
Originally posted by eyezen
Yes I understand that. My question is to the post above me.

quote Mark Dexter:

BTW, since, by rule, the game has not ended, the team scored upon gets the ball for an inbounds with 0.0 on the clock. Good luck with the tip in that situation.

Is he refering to the clock stopping when the ball goes in under a minute in the second half?

If so, I'm saying that the clock runs out while the ball is in flight.

Maybe I'm missing something? I was confused by this statement and what rule he was refering to.

eyezen,
Dexter is warped half the time. Wry, dry wit escapes me often.
Maybe he'll explain.
You may be right about him ...thinking NCAA, but also there's that 0.3 tip thing that we'd have to call with 0.00 showing on the clock. ...A tough call!
mick

BTW, if you click quote under the post you wanna answer, that post comes up on your response. If you click add reply you come up with a clean slate.
Reply With Quote
  #10 (permalink)  
Old Fri Jan 09, 2004, 12:55am
Official Forum Member
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Posts: 4,801
Quote:
Originally posted by eyezen
Yes I understand that. My question is to the post above me.

quote Mark Dexter:

BTW, since, by rule, the game has not ended, the team scored upon gets the ball for an inbounds with 0.0 on the clock. Good luck with the tip in that situation.

Is he refering to the clock stopping when the ball goes in under a minute in the second half?

If so, I'm saying that the clock runs out while the ball is in flight.

Maybe I'm missing something? I was confused by this statement and what rule he was refering to.
I'm the one who was missing something (called a brain). Yes - clock can expire while in flight, and game is over. If you clearly saw the ball through the basket before the time expired, then you have to have a reset.
__________________
"To win the game is great. To play the game is greater. But to love the game is the greatest of all."
Reply With Quote
  #11 (permalink)  
Old Fri Jan 09, 2004, 12:57am
Official Forum Member
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Posts: 4,801
Quote:
Originally posted by mick

You may be right about him ...thinking NCAA, but also there's that 0.3 tip thing that we'd have to call with 0.00 showing on the clock. ...A tough call!
mick

Hmmmmm - interesting. I think I asked about this several years ago (clock starts running at 5.0, you see the shot taken at 0.2) and the decision was that it was legal. The whole 0.3 refers to how much time A1 needs to control it, not how much to let go. (If he releases at 0.2, he must have started his shot before then.)

What I'm not sure on is if either replay system (NBA/NCAA) allows the crew chief/ref to decide on tap/try along with whether or not the ball was released before time expired. Anyone want to take a stab on this part?
__________________
"To win the game is great. To play the game is greater. But to love the game is the greatest of all."
Reply With Quote
  #12 (permalink)  
Old Fri Jan 09, 2004, 12:46pm
Official Forum Member
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Posts: 88
Quote:
Originally posted by mick
Makes sense to me.
Speed of electricity (186,000 mps?) is quicker than a blink of the eye.
I guess Texas is not just good, but lucky, too.
mick [/B]
I thought that was the speed of light and that electricity took the local "bus"
__________________
I once had a sense of humour but now I am a referee
Reply With Quote
  #13 (permalink)  
Old Fri Jan 09, 2004, 01:32pm
In Memoriam
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Hell
Posts: 20,213
Quote:
Originally posted by Malcolm Tucker
Quote:
Originally posted by mick
Makes sense to me.
Speed of electricity (186,000 mps?) is quicker than a blink of the eye.
I guess Texas is not just good, but lucky, too.
mick
I thought that was the speed of light and that electricity took the local "bus" [/B]
Mick was actually pretty accurate. The speed of light is approx. 186,000mps, but they have electrical pulses that approach that speed now.

http://physicsweb.org/article/news/6/1/13
Reply With Quote
  #14 (permalink)  
Old Fri Jan 09, 2004, 02:03pm
Official Forum Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: Just north of hell
Posts: 9,250
Send a message via AIM to Dan_ref
Quote:
Originally posted by Jurassic Referee
Quote:
Originally posted by Malcolm Tucker
Quote:
Originally posted by mick
Makes sense to me.
Speed of electricity (186,000 mps?) is quicker than a blink of the eye.
I guess Texas is not just good, but lucky, too.
mick
I thought that was the speed of light and that electricity took the local "bus"
Mick was actually pretty accurate. The speed of light is approx. 186,000mps, but they have electrical pulses that approach that speed now.

http://physicsweb.org/article/news/6/1/13 [/B]
I couldn't get your link to work but Mick's answer is incomplete. The speed of light is 186,000 mps (about 1 ft per second) through a vacuum. Electrical signals do not travel through a vacuum, they travel through conductors that are surrounded by insulators (dielectric). In the most commonly used cicuit boards signals propogate at about one half that speed, .5 ft per second which is the same way as saying it takes 2 additional nanoseconds for the signal to travel for every foot of conductor on a reasonably manufactured circuit board. It's much slower per foot if we're talking about cables surrounded by air, which is what we're talking about when we connect a control board to a horn, scoreboard and lights in a basketball arena.

Reply With Quote
  #15 (permalink)  
Old Fri Jan 09, 2004, 02:26pm
Official Forum Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Western Mass.
Posts: 9,104
Send a message via AIM to ChuckElias
Quote:
Originally posted by Dan_ref
The speed of light is 186,000 mps (about 1 ft per second) through a vacuum.
Ok, I know I'm missing something here, but how does 186,000 miles per second equal 1 foot per second?
__________________
Any NCAA rules and interpretations in this post are relevant for men's games only!
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:11pm.



Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.3.0 RC1