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Old Thu Aug 22, 2002, 01:56am
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R1 with no outs and a 3-0 count on B2. The next pitch is a ball. The coach of the defensive team immediately requests time as he is walking out onto the field.

You guys see where I'm coming from? The runner on first has yet to advance to second base and the coach is already making his way onto the field. My confusion is . . . it's done all the time. But shouldn't the coach have to wait until the runners at least ADVANCE and then fail to continue on?

I saw it in the Yankees/Angels game today and I figured ("Yea, the runner is NEVER gonna attempt to get to third in that situation"), but then again . . . what if he did?

I haven't even approached the rule book. I'm just looking for what some of you more experienced guys think of this situation.

I appreciate it.
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Old Thu Aug 22, 2002, 03:08am
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This is a "gimmee" in pro ball, and high level college. But don't let them do it in amateur ball, especially with youngsters. At my pregamme, I always warned the managers/coaches not to come out of the dugout before I give them "TIME". And I won't give it until all action has stopped on the bases.

If you allow this, you're taking a potential play away from the offense.

Bob

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Old Thu Aug 22, 2002, 07:54am
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I've got a situation similiar to this...

My team had the bases loaded (I am coaching 3rd base). The opposing coach visits the mound. Their meeting is over and play resumes. at the end of the inning the umpire told me I should have sent my runner because the coach never called for time.

I was thinking to myself how in the world could a manager visit the mound without the umpire granting "time." Was the umpire wrong in this instance?

The league I am in uses Official Baseball Rules (American League.).
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Old Thu Aug 22, 2002, 09:02am
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Time not called.

This happens all the time in our league here. The pitcher walks a batter and the coach is immediatley walking onto the field requesting time. I agree in the majors its no big deal as no one is going to be running more than the base they are entitled too.

We do a lot of run to second on a walk as often there in no-one covering and the catcher/picher are not paying attention either. Some assume that just because you throw the ball to the picther on the rubber the play is dead.

Our better blues just watch as the runner goes anyway but there seem to be a number who call time the moment a coach asks for it even though plays are still happening. Time is not automatic just because it is asked for. The coaches need to wait before it is called.

In your sit by all means you should have sent the 3rd base runner home and maybe the 2nd base runner too. Who knows in the confusion you might even have cleared the bases. The coach gathering his infielders at the mound without having time called is just bad coaching and he should pay the price in full.

Did just that last year the coach ran out to argue a call at first and our R3 ran home no time was asked for or given and the run scores.

john
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Old Thu Aug 22, 2002, 10:21am
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Quote:
Originally posted by Gold_Spark
I haven't even approached the rule book. I'm just looking for what some of you more experienced guys think of this situation.

I appreciate it.
If it's a younger league, where the runers might keep going, tell the coach to "wait until the runner gets to first." THat will let him know that you've heard him request time and will grant it, but will also stop him from progressing onto the field.

As the players get older, you can "read" the runners and grant time before all play is fully stopped -- a couple of steps before BR reaches the bag at the Pony level, about 1/2 way at HS varsity, as soon as the ball is caught in college (adjust for your area).

The pro game has a "flow" that all participants know, understand and respect. THat "flow" doesn't exist at the lower levels, so the umpires can't act the same.
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Old Fri Aug 23, 2002, 11:56am
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Originally posted by Gold_Spark

R1 with no outs and a 3-0 count on B2. The next pitch is a ball. The coach of the defensive team immediately requests time as he is walking out onto the field.

You guys see where I'm coming from? The runner on first has yet to advance to second base and the coach is already making his way onto the field. My confusion is . . . it's done all the time. But shouldn't the coach have to wait until the runners at least ADVANCE and then fail to continue on?

I saw it in the Yankees/Angels game today and I figured ("Yea, the runner is NEVER gonna attempt to get to third in that situation"), but then again . . . what if he did?

I haven't even approached the rule book. I'm just looking for what some of you more experienced guys think of this situation.

I appreciate it.


For get about the PROS, that's a different ballgame altogether and at the PRO level you don't have trick plays that you see in amateur sports like B1 continuing to walk towards second with R3.

Therefore, as others mentioned, you need to take into account the age of the players plus the TEAMS involved.

I would say in most instances DO NOT GRANT AN AUTOMATIC Time Out on a 60 ft. diamond. More often than not, especially with R3 on a 60ft. diamond, B1 will continue onwards.

On a 90ft. diamond as Bob mentioned at the HS varsity level, when player is about 1/2 way you could grant time out.

However, even on a 90ft. diamond some managers will instruct B1 to continue to advance it all depends upon the Teams involved.

Therefore, to sum-up

60 Ft. Diamond for the most part do not Give Automatic Time Out until player reaches first base and it is EVIDENT that they are NOT going to advance.

90 ft. diamond - It's a game by game process. You need to know the Teams involved. Generally at the HS VS level you don't have to worry about it.

Pete Booth
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Old Fri Aug 23, 2002, 10:49pm
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Many times coaches of the defense have been upset because a runner advanced on the coach calling time. I tell all coaches and players that calling time is my job as the umpire. Asking for time is your job as a coach or player. Just because you asked for it dosen't mean I gave it to you.
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Old Sat Aug 24, 2002, 01:20pm
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Thanks for the input fellas . . .

I kinda got what I expected. When I saw it in the major league game I ASSUMED that it had to do with an accepted practice.

In past games . . . I've always asked the coaches to wait until the runners stop advancing before they walk out onto the field. That is when I call time.

In this case, I was just curious as to what you guys thought. Thanks
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