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Old Wed Feb 07, 2018, 08:54am
Mark T. DeNucci, Sr. Mark T. DeNucci, Sr. is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pizanno View Post
Though common in almost every game, avoiding 'retroactive' timeout calls can help prevent these tough situations. Requesting time out during live ball, especially when a turnover or violation is imminent, puts officials in a tight spot.

Get comfortable with the phrase "I heard your request, but BY RULE, I can only grant timeout when your player is in control of the ball", and "I'll do the same on the other side".

Game awareness is critical. Anticipating when a coach may request will also help mitigate issues.

NCAA-W put out memo that when whistle is blown for a timeout and no player is in control, it is an inadvertent whistle. Of course, either team may then call a timeout when ball is dead.


I have been retired as a women's college official for ten years but without seeing the actual wording of the memo it would appear that the memo is poorly written. As we all know that before we can grant the TO request we must verify that it is the HC or in the case of a women's game an AC is making the request. We know that between the time the request is made and air is actually put in the whistle that a number of things to the status of the Ball can occur. I hope the memo means that the Team making the request is not to be "penalized" because the Game Official followed proper protocol.

MTD, Sr.
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Mark T. DeNucci, Sr.
Trumbull Co. (Warren, Ohio) Bkb. Off. Assn.
Wood Co. (Bowling Green, Ohio) Bkb. Off. Assn.
Toledo, Ohio
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