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  #1 (permalink)  
Old Sat Mar 11, 2006, 07:33pm
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Last year I was HL in a very important game. The visiting teams guard kept lining up in the NZ at least once on every series. My philosophy (at that time) was to flag it because it's not a judgement call, this is black and white. I also figured that after 1 or 2 flags they would get the idea, but they never did. I recently read an article that said since there's no clear advantage, to just give a warning to the offense and let them play the game. What's everyone's take on this?
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Old Sun Mar 12, 2006, 07:01am
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I don't know Fed rules but in NCAA this is a dead ball foul. Most guys I know would see it once, get word into the huddle that the G needs to back up a bit and then flag if it continues. (Since it is a dead ball foul, Team A does not gain any advantage since you are not letting the snap go off)
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Old Sun Mar 12, 2006, 09:07am
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Fed rules are the same, and 'round here that's exactly what they tell us to do - one warning (unless he's WAY over), then flag it for the rest of the game.
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Old Sun Mar 12, 2006, 07:47pm
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Here's my take, next play, let the WH know, and he will let the lineman know that they are in the NZ. If it happens again, you may want to flay it or try it one more time, then flag it. I am sure a lot of you will argue this point.

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Old Mon Mar 13, 2006, 09:00am
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REPLY: We approach it the same way that TxMike and R-U describe.
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Old Mon Mar 13, 2006, 11:24am
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Same here. Talk (warn) and then flag. I assume this is not a lower level game where you do more teaching.
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Old Mon Mar 13, 2006, 12:35pm
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schmitty, one other thing that I found easy to do when I worked the LJ position is talk directly to the coaches. Since you were on that team's sideline all day it should have made it all that much easier. I have found that coaches always listen when you help them try to prevent a foul. You'll immediately hear them yell out to the offending player to line up correctly. And, you're not favoring one team. When the coach has thanked me, I politely respond by saying "no problem coach, we extend the courtesy to both teams. Let's just clean it up."
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Old Mon Mar 13, 2006, 10:06pm
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I agree with everyone so far. I did tell the lineman after the play, then on my way back I told the coach. But they kept doing it and then they were saying how it didn't affect the play and all that stuff. I recently read an article that says if there's no advantage then to let it go. Thanks for all the input.

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Old Tue Mar 14, 2006, 05:22am
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If he continues doing it then he certainly does gain an advantage by being that much closer to the player he intends to block. I don't know what article you are referring to but this is most likely NOT what the author intended.
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Old Tue Mar 14, 2006, 12:53pm
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Talking

WARNING, TELL THE COACH....THEN FLAG ALL NIGHT LONG
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Old Sat Mar 25, 2006, 09:44pm
MJT MJT is offline
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If "in" the NZ, do not flag 1st time and tell R to tell the linemen to move back. If "past" the NZ, flag 1st time and tell R to tell the linemen to move back.
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Old Mon Mar 27, 2006, 09:52am
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I believe that I may have read the same thing that you did (in terms of an article on letting fouls go that don't have an impact on the play). I have mixed feelings about this whole concept and how it is employed. I think its a relatively good idea (I certainly don't feel good about a little holding by a reciever on a sweep play away or a dive play up the middle), but I fear that it can go too far. Procedure and pre-snap dead ball fouls are, in my opinion, not places to apply the "how does it effect the play" thinking.
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Old Mon Mar 27, 2006, 02:09pm
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We follow the same philosophy on our crew as everyone else. One warning, tell the coach at the same time and then keeping flagging it for the second occurance on.

That being said, I have this issue. The first time it happens (the one you would give the warning on) you do not call the guard for the offsides, and a running play (or a broken running play) comes his way and goes ___ (fill in any yardage you want) for a touchdown. Were the extra inches an advantage? Hard telling, but I do not know how good I would feel about myself for not calling the offsides on a scoring play.
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