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  #1 (permalink)  
Old Tue Feb 11, 2003, 11:38am
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I can't recall the last time I saw a lane violation called when a player steps into the lane a split second before the free throw makes contact with the rim/board....I see players getting the rebounding advantage by doing this frequently.... I'm looking for some insight on how this board's readers make the determination to call this or not....if there are times you see it happen and let it go, what factors are you considering in the decision to ignore it?
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Old Tue Feb 11, 2003, 12:55pm
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I called it last night

It wasn't quite a split second. I think the coach was teaching his girls to anticipate the rebound. One of the girls just anticipated a little too much. She did have great rebounding position.
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Old Tue Feb 11, 2003, 12:57pm
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If lane violations occur it is best to call them once or twice early in the game. When you make this call in the early part of the contest, the likelihood is that you will not need to call it again during the critical final moments of the game.
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Old Wed Feb 12, 2003, 02:17pm
Tee Tee is offline
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As someone who still plays in adult leagues that use HS refs (PNBOA), we all violate the letter of the law by breaking the plane. My perception (as a player) is that I need to begin my motion as the ball is in the air, just don't touch down too early. It's not a exact thing, and it is definitely relative to the other players on the lane. I am early, but so is everyone else, I just can't be too early.

It is a art form to getting the defensive rebound, and much tougher then before the rule change from release. OTOH, I get more offensive boards on free throws, since the low block player can't set up quite as well now. Overall I prefer the release rule, to the rim rule.

It was a fairly subtle change, but the embarrasment of not getting the defensive board is greater than the positive of getting the increased number of offensive rebounds.

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Old Wed Feb 12, 2003, 02:39pm
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I've actually noticed that some teams intentionally have some players test how the officials are going to call this rule early on so they know what to expect the rest of the game. If we don't call it early, we are giving a big advantage to one team.

One mechanic I follow is that if a player violates the plane and the ball goes in, I'll let that player know that they are coming in early and that usually avoids the violation on the next shot.
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Old Wed Feb 12, 2003, 03:24pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by Tee
As someone who still plays in adult leagues that use HS refs (PNBOA), we all violate the letter of the law by breaking the plane. My perception (as a player) is that I need to begin my motion as the ball is in the air, just don't touch down too early. It's not a exact thing, and it is definitely relative to the other players on the lane. I am early, but so is everyone else, I just can't be too early.

It is a art form to getting the defensive rebound, and much tougher then before the rule change from release. OTOH, I get more offensive boards on free throws, since the low block player can't set up quite as well now. Overall I prefer the release rule, to the rim rule.

It was a fairly subtle change, but the embarrasment of not getting the defensive board is greater than the positive of getting the increased number of offensive rebounds.

Interesting.

I think it is easier to get offensive rebounds with a release rule (the rule changed from "rim" to "release" while I was in HS, and I've played in adult leagues with both rules). With a "rim" rule, the offensive player can really only go one direction -- straight into the lane -- so there is only one direction to block out. With the release rule, ther is time to spin around the back of the defensive player and get the inside position -- meaning the defensive player has to block out in two directions. (The release rule also makes it easier on a player trying to run in from outside of the key.
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Old Wed Feb 12, 2003, 03:39pm
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I think the rim rule benefits whoever can stretch that rule without getting nailed, while release is more equal to all. It is interesting to see the comment about going a bit early as long as your foot doesn't come down before the ball hits rim. I have never coached that way, but may start teaching it.

I think that when we play rim, we lose a lot of rebounds to teams that leave that tiny bit earlier than the actual moment the ball hits rim. Since we play more games on release than on rim, I hadn't really given it that much thought, but it has been a problem this winter. May need to change my instructions to the girls - I will be watching closer now anyway!
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Old Wed Feb 12, 2003, 04:30pm
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Coach !!! you're going to teach your players to cheat and see if the refs will call it?

9-1-9 ...may not have either foot beyond the vertical plane of the outside edge of any lane boundary...

Note: The restrictions... apply until the ball touches the ring or backboard or until the free throw ends (miss everything).

It's worth a try. Everybody's doin' it. And we're probably not calling it tight enough.

Do you feel like you have been getting the short end of the free throw rebounding game?
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"There are no superstar calls. We don't root for certain teams. We don't cheat. But sometimes we just miss calls." - Joe Crawford
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Old Wed Feb 12, 2003, 04:42pm
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We are fairly consistently getting beat into the lane when we play rim vs when we play release. We hav ethe size and skill to block out.

I don't teach kids to cheat, but I will teach them to play to how the game is called. If not breaking the plane until ball strikes rim results in getting beat into the lane every time, we will need to go earlier like everyone else. Otherwise we give easy putbacks and get more shooting fouls (you are usually out of position for a good shot challenge as wlel when this happens).
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