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-   -   Dribbling During Inbounds Plays (https://forum.officiating.com/basketball/57967-dribbling-during-inbounds-plays.html)

Stampede2525 Sun Apr 25, 2010 09:26pm

Dribbling During Inbounds Plays
 
Under NFHS rules, is a player inbounding a pass after a made basket allowed to dribble the ball out of bounds before he passes it to another player inbounds? Also, is the inbounding player allowed to throw a bounce pass out of bounds to a teammate who comes from inbounds to out-of-bounds to receive it?

Nevadaref Sun Apr 25, 2010 09:46pm

Yes in both cases.

9.2.2 SITUATION D: A1 dribbles the ball on floor on the out-of-bounds area
before making a throw-in. RULING: Legal, a player may bounce the ball on the
out-of-bounds area prior to making a throw-in.

mbyron Mon Apr 26, 2010 06:53am

Quote:

Originally Posted by Stampede2525 (Post 674931)
Under NFHS rules, is a player inbounding a pass after a made basket allowed to dribble the ball out of bounds before he passes it to another player inbounds? Also, is the inbounding player allowed to throw a bounce pass out of bounds to a teammate who comes from inbounds to out-of-bounds to receive it?

1. Yes, during ANY throw in.

2. Yes, but ONLY after a made basket.

ABC Coach Mon Apr 26, 2010 07:32am

just curious
 
I'm not trying to confuse things here, but I just want to be sure that I'm understanding things clearly. I understand that according to NFHS rules, what has been posted so far is correct. Under FIBA rules, I don't think the proposed situations would be allowed (according to Art. 17.3.1), because the ball would be touching the out-of-bounds area. Am I properly seeing the difference between the NFHS and FIBA rules?

Mark Padgett Mon Apr 26, 2010 11:09am

Quote:

Originally Posted by mbyron (Post 674951)
1. Yes, during ANY throw in.

2. Yes, but ONLY after a made or awarded basket.

Fixed it for ya'. We all tend to forget that part.

Mark Padgett Mon Apr 26, 2010 11:10am

Quote:

Originally Posted by ABC Coach (Post 674953)
I'm not trying to confuse things here, but I just want to be sure that I'm understanding things clearly. I understand that according to NFHS rules, what has been posted so far is correct. Under FIBA rules, I don't think the proposed situations would be allowed (according to Art. 17.3.1), because the ball would be touching the out-of-bounds area. Am I properly seeing the difference between the NFHS and FIBA rules?

What's FIBA? :confused:

Adam Mon Apr 26, 2010 11:56am

Quote:

Originally Posted by ABC Coach (Post 674953)
I'm not trying to confuse things here, but I just want to be sure that I'm understanding things clearly. I understand that according to NFHS rules, what has been posted so far is correct. Under FIBA rules, I don't think the proposed situations would be allowed (according to Art. 17.3.1), because the ball would be touching the out-of-bounds area. Am I properly seeing the difference between the NFHS and FIBA rules?

As I don't have access to it, I can only ask you, does 17.3.1 specify "during a throw-in pass" or similar language?

APG Mon Apr 26, 2010 12:20pm

Quote:

Originally Posted by Snaqwells (Post 674975)
As I don't have access to it, I can only ask you, does 17.3.1 specify "during a throw-in pass" or similar language?

17.3.1 A player taking a throw-in shall not:

Take more than five (5) seconds to release the ball.
Step into the playing court while having the ball in his hand(s).
Cause the ball to touch out-of-bounds, after it has been released on the throwin.
Touch the ball on the playing court before it has touched another player.
Cause the ball to enter the basket directly.
Move a total distance from the designated throw-in place, laterally in one or in both directions, to exceed a total of one (1) metre before or while releasing the ball. He is, however, permitted to move directly backwards from the line as far as circumstances allow.

sseltser Mon Apr 26, 2010 12:40pm

Quote:

Originally Posted by AllPurposeGamer (Post 674976)
Cause the ball to touch out-of-bounds, after it has been released on the throwin.

The NFHS wording is similar, but the point is that the ball can touch out-of-bounds on a dribble, provided the dribble is not part of the throw-in-pass. Same thing applies to a pass to a teammate who is also out-of-bounds after a made (or awarded;)) goal - it is not a throw-in-pass, therefore, it is not subject to the restriction that prohibits the ball from touching out-of-bounds.

Adam Mon Apr 26, 2010 12:52pm

Quote:

Originally Posted by AllPurposeGamer (Post 674976)
17.3.1 A player taking a throw-in shall not:

Take more than five (5) seconds to release the ball.
Step into the playing court while having the ball in his hand(s).
Cause the ball to touch out-of-bounds, after it has been released on the throwin. Touch the ball on the playing court before it has touched another player.
Cause the ball to enter the basket directly.
Move a total distance from the designated throw-in place, laterally in one or in both directions, to exceed a total of one (1) metre before or while releasing the ball. He is, however, permitted to move directly backwards from the line as far as circumstances allow.

Thanks.
As sseltser notes, the key is "after it has been released on the throwin."

Nevadaref Mon Apr 26, 2010 07:49pm

Quote:

Originally Posted by sseltser (Post 674978)
The NFHS wording is similar, but the point is that the ball can touch out-of-bounds on a dribble, provided the dribble is not part of the throw-in-pass. Same thing applies to a pass to a teammate who is also out-of-bounds after a made (or awarded;)) goal - it is not a throw-in-pass, therefore, it is not subject to the restriction that prohibits the ball from touching out-of-bounds.

Strictly speaking it's not a dribble. It is merely a bounce. That's because neither the dribbling nor traveling rules operate during a throw-in. ;)

Jurassic Referee Wed Apr 28, 2010 05:52am

Quote:

Originally Posted by nike22 (Post 675059)
why?

Because the rules say so.

bainsey Wed Apr 28, 2010 10:32am

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jurassic Referee (Post 675066)
Because the rules say so.

Would it also be fair to say that neither dribbling nor travelling can exist without player control?

sseltser Wed Apr 28, 2010 02:06pm

Quote:

Originally Posted by bainsey (Post 675085)
Would it also be fair to say that neither dribbling nor travelling can exist without player control?

Dribbling a live ball inbounds is one way to have player control - so it is fair to say that.

Travelling can not occur* without holding the ball and holding the ball is one way to have player control - so it is fair to say that.

*with one exception.

just another ref Wed Apr 28, 2010 08:17pm

I think the point was that bouncing the ball on the floor by the thrower during the throw-in does not meet the definition of a dribble.

Nevadaref Wed Apr 28, 2010 08:51pm

Quote:

Originally Posted by just another ref (Post 675144)
I think the point was that bouncing the ball on the floor by the thrower during the throw-in does not meet the definition of a dribble.

Correct.

Adam Thu Apr 29, 2010 09:39am

Quote:

Originally Posted by just another ref (Post 675144)
I think the point was that bouncing the ball on the floor by the thrower during the throw-in does not meet the definition of a dribble.

And the distinction is important, because if it was considered a dribble, then the dribble could end creating a potential double-dribble situation.

Adam Thu Apr 29, 2010 09:40am

Quote:

Originally Posted by bainsey (Post 675085)
Would it also be fair to say that neither dribbling nor travelling can exist without player control?

Yes, but only because player control is defined as one of these two events.


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