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Old Sat Jun 02, 2001, 01:35am
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I want to ask those individuals that do several levels or have done several levels over your career.

How is 3 Person different at the NF, NCAA Women's, and NCAA Men's? What are the basic fundamental differences and why are the philosophies so different?

I was at a camp today and we were shown a Women's NCAA video talking about fouls and mechanics. I made the mistake of asking a question about the differences this had to do with the NF, (that offended the clinician for some reason) but all I wanted to know is what was on the tape related to us lowely High School officials. So basically how is NF mechanics in 3 person different than NCAA Men's and Women's.

Thank you in advance.

Peace
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Old Sat Jun 02, 2001, 02:03pm
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I can tell you by my observation that in the NBA, they "lock down" at the end of almost every period. Usually the trail signals for it.

My question then becomes: if they think they need to lock down because the final shot is so important they don't want to be caught in a switch, why don't they lock down for the entire game?

Every shot is as important as any other, since all points count toward the final score.
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Old Sat Jun 02, 2001, 02:23pm
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Rut

Basically NCAA Men's and the NFHS mechanics are the same. The are some differences between the NCAA Men's and Women's mechanic, most of which deal with areas of responsibility between the lead and trail. On the women's side (which is closer to the NBA mechanic), the lead is responsible for the ball when it is foul line extended or below and on the strong side. The lead even signals the three point shot. Actually the lead responsibilities in the NCAA women's mechanic is very similar to the lead's responsibilities in a 2-person crew.

As far as why philosophically the NBA and NCAA women's mechanic is that way, my feeling is that they think the lead has a better look at a play right in front of him/her than the trail does (as he/she may have to look through some players to see the ball).


hope this helps some,

jake
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Old Sat Jun 02, 2001, 03:54pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by Mark Padgett
I can tell you by my observation that in the NBA, they "lock down" at the end of almost every period. Usually the trail signals for it.

My question then becomes: if they think they need to lock down because the final shot is so important they don't want to be caught in a switch, why don't they lock down for the entire game?

Every shot is as important as any other, since all points count toward the final score.
MARK-- The reason that they lock down at the end of the game is so that there is no confusion at all about who has the clock at the end of the game..As far as the switching {flexing} durring the game-- the reason is to get the best angle{view} as much as possible on every play.
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Old Mon Jun 04, 2001, 01:12pm
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Mark you are right almost every shot is important but the final shot in a one point ball game is going to be more important than the one taken at 6:52 in the first quarter. It has nothing to do with the importance if a ball goes in a ball goes in it's the last second shot at the buzzer that has to be right so in the NBA, they do not flex with less than 24 seconds left. Generally trail has the last shot. There are some procedures when ball is in back court and there is less than 5.9 seconds that the center has responsibility for shots taken in BC and lead has responsibility for shots taken in FC. It is a great system and personally the end of game procedures with NBA mechanics work better than the others.
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Old Mon Jun 04, 2001, 01:46pm
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Just to add to the discussion...in NCAA Women's, we are not to rotate - we "lockdown" - when the shot clock is off each half, AND when the shot clock is below 5 seconds on any possession...again, the reason is so that there is clear and definite knowledge of who has the clock on any of those situations...in Women's mechanics, it is always C, so we stay put and know who has it...
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Old Mon Jun 04, 2001, 06:17pm
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Locking down in NF

It does not really matter in NF if you lock down or not. The last second shot is going to be called by the same person no matter what. Even if you are in the middle of a rotation, the same person is still going to make the call. It is always the Trail or Center, opposite of the table. And if there is a rotation during the play and the C becomes the new T, that officials will still have the last second shot. I am not sure about NCAA Men's, but that is how it is in Federation. But I do know that some do advocate not to rotate during the last few seconds.

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Old Tue Jun 05, 2001, 09:40am
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Re: Locking down in NF

Quote:
Originally posted by JRutledge
It does not really matter in NF if you lock down or not. The last second shot is going to be called by the same person no matter what. Even if you are in the middle of a rotation, the same person is still going to make the call. It is always the Trail or Center, opposite of the table. And if there is a rotation during the play and the C becomes the new T, that officials will still have the last second shot. I am not sure about NCAA Men's, but that is how it is in Federation. But I do know that some do advocate not to rotate during the last few seconds.

One exception to this (probably for advanced crews only) -- In Fed, opposite the table has the shot. If L and T are opposite, and there is a steal, or a made shot with a few seconds left and a long throw, etc, then the old L (new T) will have to make the call from far away.

Options: (a) L has call on long throw; (b) L rotates so C is opposite and then locks down.

Option (b) is especially good if there is a delay / stall in the last minute.
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