The Official Forum  

Go Back   The Official Forum > Basketball

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)  
Old Wed Jul 21, 2004, 03:56pm
Official Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Houston
Posts: 572
The term "patient whistle" is a good one. I refereed soccer, and the norm there was to put a whistle on a wrist lanyard. Now, this automatically slowed your whistle time, so you could play "advantage" if it was appropriate. Are there any basketball referees that use a wrist lanyard? Or is that "just not done"
Reply With Quote
  #2 (permalink)  
Old Wed Jul 21, 2004, 04:25pm
Official Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 1,988
In my board, it's just not done. The whistle is on a lanyard that's attached to your shirt, or that goes around your neck.
Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old Wed Jul 21, 2004, 05:19pm
Do not give a damn!!
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: On the border
Posts: 28,058
Not in basketball.

Not only have I never seen one, I have never heard anyone suggest the use of one.

Basketball is a sport where more things are going on in a much smaller area. You have to stop things "right now" basketball than rather take your time. Of course you have to have a patient whistle at times, but you need to also stop things immediately. I know several people that use them in football, but I have never heard that it would be acceptable in basketball. Also in basketball we have to use both hands for signaling at times and having one of those whistles would cause a problem now and then.

Peace
__________________
"When the phone does not ring, the assignor is calling."
--Black

Charles Michael “Mick” Chambers (1947-2010)
Reply With Quote
  #4 (permalink)  
Old Wed Jul 21, 2004, 07:11pm
Official Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: In a little pink house
Posts: 5,289
Send a message via AIM to Back In The Saddle Send a message via MSN to Back In The Saddle Send a message via Yahoo to Back In The Saddle
One problem I've noticed is that if one partner has a patient whistle, and the other does not, the game begins to feel really one-sided from an oficiating point of view. I've had pretty good luck so far talking to my partners about this and getting more on the same page. But most of the top-rated officials around here have a very quick whistle. And while I feel the patient whistle is the better way to go, I wonder if I'll be able to move up with it.
__________________
"It is not enough to do your best; you must know what to do, and then do your best." - W. Edwards Deming
Reply With Quote
  #5 (permalink)  
Old Thu Jul 22, 2004, 11:15am
Official Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Portland, Oregon
Posts: 9,466
Send a message via AIM to rainmaker
Quote:
Originally posted by Back In The Saddle
One problem I've noticed is that if one partner has a patient whistle, and the other does not, the game begins to feel really one-sided from an oficiating point of view. I've had pretty good luck so far talking to my partners about this and getting more on the same page. But most of the top-rated officials around here have a very quick whistle. And while I feel the patient whistle is the better way to go, I wonder if I'll be able to move up with it.
You've got to go with the flow. If on one at the top levels uses a patient whistle, you'd better not, either. But before you start working on that, you might talk to some of them, or an assignor or evaluator. It may be that you're "not seeing the whole play" before you make a decision!
Reply With Quote
  #6 (permalink)  
Old Sun Jul 25, 2004, 09:10pm
Official Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 1,988
A patient whistle is not a good idea for the game of basketball. The main reason behind this is that the game can progress too far for you to backtrack in the second or two that it takes you to think. If an infraction occurs, the play must be stopped immediately, no question about it.

In other sports like football, they want to you think over your call before you blow the whistle, and that's where I get into trouble, because I've been conditioned to make split-second decisions, and sometimes I will make the wrong call because I don't take enough time to think it over.
Reply With Quote
  #7 (permalink)  
Old Sun Jul 25, 2004, 11:28pm
Official Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Portland, Oregon
Posts: 9,466
Send a message via AIM to rainmaker
Quote:
Originally posted by ref18
A patient whistle is not a good idea for the game of basketball. The main reason behind this is that the game can progress too far for you to backtrack in the second or two that it takes you to think. If an infraction occurs, the play must be stopped immediately, no question about it.

In other sports like football, they want to you think over your call before you blow the whistle, and that's where I get into trouble, because I've been conditioned to make split-second decisions, and sometimes I will make the wrong call because I don't take enough time to think it over.
Patient whistle doesn't mean taking time to think it over. It means waiting to see what develops in the play. It means not calling a ticky-tack foul against a team that's behind by 25 when the ball goes into the basket. It means waiting to see if the little bump affects the next step or two. It means not calling a minor hand-check one step before the shot, to see if the contact continues so you can call it a shooting foul. It means being willing to say to a coach, "Yea, it was a late whistle." It means knowing when to wait as described here, and when not to.
Reply With Quote
  #8 (permalink)  
Old Tue Jul 27, 2004, 02:44pm
Official Forum Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 252
Some NBA referees like Jess Kersey, Earl Strom, Richie Powers, and Steve Javie don't use a lanyard. They just hold a whistle in their hand or run with it in they mouth. They just have to take the whistle out of their mouths, don't spit it out!
Reply With Quote
  #9 (permalink)  
Old Tue Jul 27, 2004, 03:44pm
Official Forum Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Posts: 1,026
Quote:
Originally posted by rainmaker
Quote:
Originally posted by ref18
A patient whistle is not a good idea for the game of basketball. The main reason behind this is that the game can progress too far for you to backtrack in the second or two that it takes you to think. If an infraction occurs, the play must be stopped immediately, no question about it.

In other sports like football, they want to you think over your call before you blow the whistle, and that's where I get into trouble, because I've been conditioned to make split-second decisions, and sometimes I will make the wrong call because I don't take enough time to think it over.
Patient whistle doesn't mean taking time to think it over. It means waiting to see what develops in the play. It means not calling a ticky-tack foul against a team that's behind by 25 when the ball goes into the basket. It means waiting to see if the little bump affects the next step or two. It means not calling a minor hand-check one step before the shot, to see if the contact continues so you can call it a shooting foul. It means being willing to say to a coach, "Yea, it was a late whistle." It means knowing when to wait as described here, and when not to.
Juulie, I think you nailed it. A patient whistle is not to be taken literally, it is more a philosophy of seeing the result of a play. How often have we seen a bump on a player driving to the basket, we blow the whistle only to realise we're taking away a lay-up. A patient whistle will let you see that it is better to ignore that contact. If you see a travel or someone step out-of-bounds, there is no reason to hesitate blowing the whistle.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:50am.



Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.3.0 RC1