The Official Forum  

Go Back   The Official Forum > Baseball

Closed Thread
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)  
Old Wed Apr 16, 2014, 10:52am
Official Forum Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Lincoln NE
Posts: 210
NFHS Past and Present Rules Interps (Updated to 2017)

Bob and many others placed past rules interps on the Basketball board.
That would be a nice addition to the baseball board as well if anyone, Bob? (hint) or anyone, Mark? could come up with them and add to the top of the baseball board.
  #2 (permalink)  
Old Wed Apr 16, 2014, 01:39pm
Official Forum Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Lincoln NE
Posts: 210
2010 NFHS Interps

2010 NFHS Baseball Rules Interpretations

Publisher’s Note: The National Federation of State High School Associations is the only source of official high school interpretations. They do not set aside nor modify any rule. They are made and published by the NFHS in response to situations presented.
Robert F. Kanaby, Publisher, NFHS Publications © 2010

SITUATION 1: While in the set position, F1 has his pitching hand hanging straight down in front of his body, stationary, as he gets the sign from the catcher. RULING: The use of the “gorilla” stance in the set position is legal provided the arm is not moving. The batter, runner(s) on base, and coaches are able to view the pitcher and the ball and are not placed at a disadvantage. (6-1-3)

SITUATION 2: While in the set position, F1 has his pitching hand hanging straight down in front of his body, swinging back and forth, as he gets the sign from the catcher. RULING: This is not legal and is an illegal pitch or a balk if there are runners on base. While this “gorilla” stance is legal if the pitching hand is stationary, it is illegal if the arm is swinging back and forth. (6-1-3)

SITUATION 3: While in the set position, F1 has his pitching arm resting on his thigh and his pitching hand is at rest in his lower abdominal area. RULING: This is illegal. Having his pitching hand at rest in this area gives the offense little to no visibility of the baseball and action by the pitcher. (6-1-3)

SITUATION 4: R1 is at third base and is taking his lead a few feet down the line in foul ground. B2 hits a sharp ground ball that hits third base and caroms off the base and (a) hits R1 accidentally, or (b) R1 intentionally moves so that he is hit by the fair ball. RULING: In (a), the ball remains live and in play. In (b), the ball is dead, R1 is out for his interference and other runner(s) are returned to the base they occupied at the time of the interference. B2 is awarded first base. (8-4-2k, 2-5-1e)

SITUATION 5: R1, with one out, is on second base and is off with the pitch as B2 hits a high foul fly ball near third base. As F5 moves in foul territory in an attempt to catch the foul fly, (a) R1 runs into him or (b) the head coach does not vacate his position in the coaching box and F5 contacts him in his attempt. RULING: In both situations this is interference and the ball is immediately dead. In (a), R1 is declared out and in (b), B2 is declared out and R1 is returned to second base. (7-4-1f)

SITUATION 6: R1, on second base, rounds third and runs into F5 as he attempts to field a foul fly ball. This action occurred with (a) a count of 1-1; (b) a count of 1-2; or (c) two outs. RULING: In all three instances, R1 is out for his interference. In (a), the batter returns to bat with a count of 1-2 and in (b), the batter returns to bat with a count of 1-2 as the pitch is treated as a foul for the batter’s count. In (c), B4 will lead off in his team’s next offensive half-inning. (7-4-1f)

SITUATION 7: B1 lays down a bunt that is fielded by F2 in fair territory a few feet in front of home plate. As B1 is 60 feet from home base, he is running outside the running lane with one foot completely in fair ground and not touching the lines of the running lane. F2 fields the ball and (a) attempts to throw to first but throws high into right field as he tries not to hit B1, or (b) does not attempt a throw. RULING: B1 is required to be in the running lane the last 45 feet to first base when the ball is fielded and thrown from an area behind him. In (a), this is interference and B1 is out and the ball is declared dead. In (b), since there was no throw, there is no interference. F2 is not required to hit B1 to demonstrate that B1 is out of the running lane, but a throw must be made for the interference to be declared. (8-4-1g)

SITUATION 8: F1, while on the pitcher’s plate in either the windup or set position, (a) adjusts his cap, or (b) shakes off the signal with his glove, or (c) shakes off the signal with his head. RULING: In (a), (b) and (c) these are legal actions, provided these movements of the arms and legs were not associated with the pitch. (6-1-1, 6.1.2D case book)

SITUATION 9: R1, on third base, attempts to score on a squeeze play. B4 attempts to bunt, but misses the pitch and F2 comes up with the ball and gets R1 in a rundown between third and home. F2 eventually attempts to throw R1 out at third, but makes a bad throw into left field. R1 steps on third, but his momentum takes him several steps down the foul line behind third base. R1, seeing the bad throw, turns, misses third base as he advances to home. After R1 has touched home plate and enters the dugout, the defense calls “Time” and verbally appeals R1 missing third. RULING: R1 is out on the valid defensive appeal. R1 must touch third base again on his way to home plate. (8-2-1, 8-2-6c)

SITUATION 10: The visiting team is wearing “quarterback-style” wristbands that have defensive plays listed under a Velcro flap. The pitcher is wearing a black wristband down near his fielding glove. The home coach claims that the wristbands are illegal, and all players must take them off. RULING: Provided the wristbands are not dangerous, they are legal. If the plate umpire judges the wristband worn by the pitcher to be distracting, he would need to remove it. Otherwise, it is legal for the pitcher as well. (1-5-9, 6-2-1f, penalty)

Last edited by APG; Wed Apr 16, 2014 at 01:48pm. Reason: Improve readability
  #3 (permalink)  
Old Wed Apr 16, 2014, 01:40pm
Official Forum Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Lincoln NE
Posts: 210
2010 NFHS Interps cont

SITUATION 11: R1 is on third and R2 on first with one out. B4 hits a sinking line drive to center field. R1 tags properly and goes home, while R2 is off with the hit. F8 makes a great catch. R2 is beyond second base as F8 throws back to first in an attempt to double up R2. The ball goes into the dugout with R2 still between second base and third base. R2 touches second base and goes back to touch first base. RULING: The ball is dead and R1’s run will count. R2 will be awarded two bases from the base he had at the time of the pitch (first base), so he will be awarded third base. If the defense properly appeals R2 being beyond second base at the time the ball went dead, R2 will be declared out. R1’s run would still count. (5-1-1g-3, 8-2-5, 8-2-6d-1, 8-4-2q)

SITUATION 12: With no outs, B1 has a 2-1 count when his nose begins to bleed. He is not able to get it stopped and as a result cannot finish his at-bat. The team has no substitutes available. His coach believes that the batter next up in the order can assume his count. RULING: B2 cannot assume B1’s count. With no substitutes available, B1 is declared out and B2 will come to bat with one out. An out will be called each time that spot in the batting order comes to bat. When an eligible substitute becomes available, the team may return to playing with nine players. (4-4-1f, Note 1, Note 2)

SITUATION 13: R1 is on third and R2 is on second with no outs. Both runners attempt a double steal. As R1 gets into a rundown between home and third, R2 advances and stays on third base. With R2 on third base, R1 commits interference during the rundown. RULING: The ball is dead immediately. R1 is declared out for the interference. R2 will be kept at third base since he had legally reached third at the time of the interference. (8-2-9, 8-2-8)

SITUATION 14: With R1 on third base and no outs, B2 hits a pop fly in fair territory in front of home plate. The catcher misses the ball completely, never touching it, and the backspin on the ball causes it to move back toward home where it strikes R1 in fair territory. The ball continues to move into foul ground, where it comes to rest. The offensive head coach claims R1 is not out since the batted ball “passed” an infielder. RULING: The ball is dead immediately and R1 is declared out for being contacted by a fair batted ball. B2 is awarded first base. The action of the ball in this situation is not considered to be “passing” an infielder. Had the ball contacted R1 in foul ground, the ball would be dead immediately, R1 would be returned to third and B2 would remain at bat. (8-4-2k, 5-1-1f-1)

SITUATION 15: With one out, R1 is on third base and R2 is at second base when B4 misses the sign for the squeeze bunt. B4 hits a high chopper near first base as R1 touches home plate. F3 fields the ball, touches first to retire B4 and sets to throw to third in an attempt to put out R2 who got a late start going to third base. As F3 releases the throw, B4 intentionally reaches out and hits his arm for obvious interference. RULING: R2 is declared out for the third out due to B4’s interference. R1’s run will count as he had legally acquired home before the interference occurred. (8-4-2g, 8-2-9, 5-1-1e)

SITUATION 16: The head coach requests “Time” and goes to the mound for a visit. He removes F1 and brings in S1 to pitch from the bullpen. The coach remains at the mound talking with S1 as he takes his eight warm-up throws. The opposing head coach claims that this is a charged conference because the defensive coach stayed at the mound until S1 had completed his warm-up throws. RULING: There is no charged conference to be recorded on the defensive team since F1 was removed as the pitcher. As long as the head coach leaves when S1 completes his warm-up throws and does not delay the game, no defensive conference will be charged. (3-4-1)

SITUATION 17: With R1 on first attempting to steal second base, B2 swings and misses as the ball hits the catcher’s mitt and pops up in the air. B2’s follow-through hits the ball to the backstop. RULING: This is batter interference and the ball is declared dead. B2 is out and R1 is returned to first base. (7-3-5c penalty)

SITUATION 18: With R1 on first, a pitch hits the catcher’s shin guards and is deflected toward the dugout. R1 had left first base headed for second as F1 released the pitch and is standing on second base when the deflected pitch rolls into the dugout. R1’s head coach argues that R1 should be awarded third base. RULING: R1 is awarded one base from where he was at the time of the pitch. R1’s award is second base and he will remain at second, and not be advanced to third base. (8-3-3d, 8-3-5b)

SITUATION 19: Bases are loaded with two outs and a 1-1 count on B6. The scoreboard has a 0-2 count. The plate umpire gives the correct count and verbally states “1-1.” B6 swings and misses the next pitch to make the count 1-2, but F2, thinking it is strike three, tosses the ball toward the mound as the infield players begin to leave the diamond. The third-base coach has his runners running and all of them cross home plate. The visiting defensive head coach protests that the runs should not score since the scoreboard was in error and it put them at a disadvantage. RULING: The umpires did not err on the play and both teams are responsible to know the count and the number of outs. The play stands and all three runs count. (10-2-3g)

SITUATION 20: Two outs, R3 at second base. On a 1-2 pitch, R3 attempts to steal third base as the batter attempts to check his swing. R3 is thrown out at third base for the third out. The defense now wants to appeal the check-swing on B4 so that if he went around, he struck out and would not come back to bat in the next half-inning. U1 checks with the base umpire and U2 confirms that B4 did indeed swing at strike three. RULING: Since B4’s out is a “fourth” out, the defense may select the out which is most to its advantage. B4 is out for out No. 3 and the batter following him in the lineup will bat first in the next half-inning. (2-20-2, 9-1-1d

Last edited by APG; Wed Apr 16, 2014 at 01:52pm. Reason: Improve readability
  #4 (permalink)  
Old Wed Apr 16, 2014, 01:41pm
Official Forum Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Lincoln NE
Posts: 210
2011 NFHS Interps

2011 NFHS Baseball Rules Interpretations

Publisher’s Note: The National Federation of State High School Associations is the only source of official high school interpretations. They do not set aside nor modify any rule. They are made and published by the NFHS in response to situations presented.
Robert B. Gardner, Publisher, NFHS Publications © 2011

SITUATION 1: With R1 on first base and no outs, the scoreboard shows one out. B2 hits a ground ball that the shortstop turns into a 6-4-3 double play. The first baseman rolls the ball to the mound and all the defensive players go to their dugout. The team that was on offense comes on the field, taking their defensive positions. The umpires go to their respective positions between innings. RULING: The official scorer should inform the officials of the error. Both teams will retake their respective positions with the bases empty and two outs. (9-2-2)

SITUATION 2: In the bottom of the fourth inning, Jones comes to the plate to pinch-hit for Smith. The plate umpire checks the lineup card and finds that Jones was not listed as a possible substitute. The opposing coach argues that since Jones was not listed as a substitute at the start of the game, he cannot pinch-hit. RULING: The plate umpire shall accept the substitution, make the appropriate change on the lineup card and notify the opposing team and official scorer. Jones may pinch-hit for Smith. There is no penalty. (1-1-2)

SITUATION 3: The plate umpire is reviewing the submitted lineup cards at the pre-game conference. He asks both head coaches if they have listed all known substitutes on their respective lineup card. Team A’s head coach states he will not list any substitutes on his lineup. RULING: The umpire shall not accept the lineup card until all substitutes are listed. The game cannot begin until the umpire has received lineup cards from both teams. (1-1-2, 4-1-3)

SITUATION 4: With R2 on first base and one out, B3 swings and misses on a 1-2 fastball for strike three. R2 was stealing on the pitch and B3’s follow-through interferes with the catcher’s ability to throw to second base. At the time of the interference, R2 was just over half way to second from first. RULING: In the umpire’s judgment, B3’s interference prevented the catcher from possibly throwing out R2 at second base. B3 is out for strike three and R2 is declared out because of B3’s interference. The half-inning is over. (7-3-5c Penalty)

SITUATION 5: With one out, R2 gets a great jump at first base and is just a couple of feet from second base when B3 strikes out. B3’s follow-through interferes with the catcher, who drops the ball and cannot throw to second base. RULING: The ball is declared dead when play is no longer possible. B3 is out on strikes for out No. 2. Since the catcher had no possible play on R2 (being so close to second base at the time of the interference), R2 is returned to first base. (7-3-5c Penalty)

SITUATION 6: Smith enters the batter’s box with a BESR aluminum bat. The opposing coach protests that since the handle of the bat is not round and that the taper is not smooth, it is an illegal bat. RULING: There are no restrictions on the shape of the handle, and the taper of the bat is not required to be smooth or round. Only the barrel of the bat shall be round, cylindrically symmetric and smooth. The bat is legal for play. (1-3-2b)

SITUATION 7: The batter enters the batter’s box with a BBCOR composite bat. The opposing coach wants him declared out for having an illegal bat. RULING: All BBCOR bats, aluminum or composite, are legal for play in 2011. The batter will be allowed to use the bat. (1-3-2e, f)

SITUATION 8: B3 enters the batter’s box with a bamboo bat and hits a bases-clearing triple. The opposing coach protests stating that a bamboo bat is not legal for play. RULING: The plate umpire will inspect the bat. If it has a BESR or BBCOR certification mark, it is legal for play in 2011. In the 2012 high school season, only non-wood bats that meet the BBCOR performance standard are legal for use. (1-3-2d, e, f)

SITUATION 9: During the pre-game inspection of the team’s bats, the umpires notice a hollow, composite BESR bat in the bat rack. RULING: If the hollow composite BESR bat has been granted a waiver and is listed on the “Approved Bats List,” it is legal for play. If the bat has not been granted a waiver, the umpires shall inform the coach that the bat is illegal and must be removed. (1-3-2g)

SITUATION 10: With the bases loaded and no outs, B4 hits a ground ball to the shortstop. The defense is able to get the out at third base on R2 and at second base on R3, but R1 scores and B4 is safe at first. The plate umpire picks up the bat used by B4 and notices that it is a hollow composite bat that is not on the approved waiver list. RULING: B4 is guilty of using an illegal bat. The defense has the option of taking the play or the penalty for using an illegal bat. The play will result in two outs, a runner at first and one run scored. The penalty will have B4 declared out and all runners will be returned to their respective bases at the time of the pitch – bases loaded, one out, no run scored. (7-4-1a)

SITUATION 11: The pitcher has a hard cast on his non-pitching forearm. The coach asks what must be done for him to pitch in the game. RULING: The cast must be padded with a closed-cell, slow-recovery foam pad-ding no less than ½-inch thick. Since the player is to pitch, the padding cannot be white, gray or deemed to be a color distracting to the batter by the plate umpire. (1-4-2, 1-5-8)

SITUATION 12: The short stop is wearing an unpadded ankle brace and his coach asks if it is legal for play. RULING: If the ankle brace is unaltered from the manufacturer’s original design and production, it does not require any additional padding. (1-5-8)

SITUATION 13: With a runner on first stealing on the pitch, B2 hits a ball directly to the catcher’s hands which rebounds high in the air and is caught by the pitcher. The pitcher turns and throws the runner out at second base. RULING: The ball is dead and treated as a foul ball since it was not caught by the catcher. Had the catcher caught the batted ball, it would be a foul tip and would have remained in play. (2-16-2)

SITUATION 14: Jones, the center fielder, and Brown, the right fielder, collide going after a fly ball. Brown never loses consciousness and tells his coach he is OK. Brown finishes the half-inning. As Brown heads for the dugout, he has some balance problems and stops running, complaining of dizziness. RULING: Brown shall be immediately removed from the game and shall not return to play until he is cleared by an appropriate health-care professional. (3-1-5)

SITUATION 15: R1 misses second base as he advances to third, but touches it as he safely returns to first base. The defense appeals his missing second as he advanced. RULING: The appeal is denied. The last time R1 went by second base, he properly touched the base and thus corrected the previous baserunning error. (8-2-6l)

SITUATION 16: As R1 attempts to score from second base, he misses third base by cutting well inside the infield. With the fly ball being caught, Brown attempts to return, touching third as he goes back to second base. RULING: Brown will be declared out on the appeal because a runner who misses a base in a manner to gain an unfair advantage is still vulnerable to appeal. (8-2-6l)

SITUATION 17: R1 is moving on the pitch as the batter hits a fly ball to left center field. R1 touches second base and heads for third when the ball is caught. R1 stops and returns to first base, missing second base. The ball is thrown into the dugout and R1 is awarded third. He touched first, second and third base on the award. The defense appeals his miss of second base as he attempted to return to first. RULING: R1’s actions are legal and the defensive appeal will be denied. R1 satisfied his baserunning obligations when he touched second on his last time by the base. (8-2-6l)

SITUATION 18: R1 leaves first base too soon on a caught fly ball. He touches second and nears third when his coach instructs him to return. R1 does so by running directly across the diamond toward first base. The ball gets by the first baseman, and R1 retouches first and makes it safely to second base. RULING: R1 would be declared out upon proper appeal by the defense as the principle of “Last Time By” would not apply. (8-2-6l)

SITUATION 19: Bases loaded with one out. B5 hits a fly ball into the gap between center field and right field. He is thrown out trying for second base. R2, advancing from second base, misses third base and scores. The defense properly appeals R2’s miss of third. RULING: R2’s out is the third out and the half-inning is over. No runs score since R2 was forced when he missed third base. (9-1-1b)

SITUATION 20: With R1 on third base, the pitcher is in the windup position. At the top of his motion, he pauses for two or three seconds and then delivers. RULING: The umpire shall declare a balk and score R1 from third base. After a pitcher starts his motion to pitch, he must continue the motion without interruption or alteration. (6-1-2)

Last edited by APG; Wed Apr 16, 2014 at 01:58pm. Reason: Improve readability
  #5 (permalink)  
Old Wed Apr 16, 2014, 01:44pm
Official Forum Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Lincoln NE
Posts: 210
2013 NFHS Interps

Robert B. Gardner, Publisher, NFHS Publications © 2013

SITUATION 1: The coach discovers that a player’s bat has had the end cap removed and replaced. RULING: Once the bat’s end cap has been removed, the bat is considered to be an altered bat and hence is an illegal bat for future play. Certain manufacturers consider such alteration of their bats to be unlawful and subject to possible legal action. (1-3-2 Note, 1-3-5)

SITUATION 2: On a cold day, a player uses a warming device for his bat before he comes to bat. RULING: The bat is now considered to be an illegal bat for the duration of that game. If the player is discovered using the bat, penalties under 7-4-1a would apply. (1-3-5, 7-4-1a)

SITUATION 3: The head coach has a tablet computer with video capability in the dugout. However, he is only using the tablet to keep the score and both teams’ lineups. RULING: This is permissible. The use of a tablet computer or other mobile electronic devices are allowed provided they are not used to monitor or replay any of the game for coaching purposes. (3-3-1f)

SITUATION 4: While in the dugout, the coach is using the video capability of his “smartphone” to record his pitcher’s delivery to the plate. He intends to use the video to help the pitcher correct a flaw when the team is in the dugout and not on defense. RULING: This is not allowed. The head coach will be ejected upon discovery of using the replay capability for coaching purposes. (3-3-1f)

SITUATION 5: The coach in the third-base coach’s box has a stopwatch that he is using to time the pitcher’s delivery to the plate. RULING: This is legal. A coach may have in his possession, while occupying a coach’s box, a stopwatch, a hard copy of the rules book and a hard copy of a scorebook. (3-3-1i)

SITUATION 6: The coach in the first-base coach’s box has a smartphone that has the ability to score the progress of the game. RULING: This is not allowed. A coach may not have any electronic equipment, other than a stopwatch, while in the coach’s box, even if it is intended to be used only for scoring purposes. The umpire shall either restrict the coach to the dugout for the remainder of the game or eject him. (3-3-1i Penalty)

SITUATION 7: In the fifth inning of the game, F1 is ejected for vehemently protesting a pitch that was declared to be a ball and he thought should have been strike three. S1 comes in to replace F1. How many warm-up throws is S1 allowed? RULING: S1 is allowed eight warm-up throws. The umpire-in-chief, however, may authorize more throws for S1 because F1 left the game due to an ejection. (6-2-2c Exception)

SITUATION 8: With runners on first base and third base, the pitcher legally steps toward third and feints a throw. With his pivot foot now off the pitching plate, the pitcher turns and feints a throw to first base. RULING: This is a legal pick-off play by the pitcher. (6-2-4a,b)

SITUATION 9: With runners on first base and third base, the pitcher legally steps toward third and feints a throw. With his pivot still engaged with the pitching plate, the pitcher turns and feints a throw to first base. RULING: This is a balk. While engaged with the pitcher’s plate, the pitcher may not feint toward first base. The runner from first is awarded second base and the runner from third is awarded home. (6-2-4a)

SITUATION 10: A team plays its home games at a minor league park that has the ability to display radar gun information on the scoreboard. May the information be shown or must it be turned off? RULING: The radar gun information displayed on the scoreboard is permissible provided it is used for both teams throughout the game. (3-3-1f)

SITUATION 11: On a base hit to the outfield, the runner from third base comes home but misses touching home plate. The on-deck batter physically stops him and shoves him back to the plate, where he then touches it. RULING: Physical assistance by a teammate is not allowed unless both players are viable runners. The assisted runner is out and his run does not count. (2-21-1c, 5-1-2f, 3-2-2)

SITUATION 12: In the eighth inning, the coach comes out and replaces his pitcher. Two batters later, he asks for “Time,” and goes to the mound to discuss strategy with both the catcher and the pitcher. The opposing coach argues that he must now replace the pitcher. RULING: When the game is in extra innings, a team is allowed only one charged conference per inning, but since the coach removed the pitcher on his first visit in the eighth inning, it did not count as a charged conference. Therefore, the coach still had one charged conference available to him in the inning. His conference is legal and he does not have to remove his pitcher. (3-4-1)

SITUATION 13: The visiting first baseman comes to the batter’s box with eye black painted on his face from under his eyes extending to his jaw, looking like inverted “bat wings.” Is this legal? RULING: Unless the extensive eye black is deemed to be profane, intimidating or taunting intended to embarrass, ridicule or demean, the face paint is legal. (3-3-1g-2)

SITUATION 14: With one out, a runner on second base who is not moving on the pitch, and a count of 1-0, the batter attempts to hit the pitch to right field. The catcher reaches out for the ball and obstructs the batter, causing him to foul off the pitch. The coach, wanting the batter to stay at bat, tells the plate umpire he does not want the award for obstruction on his batter, and he elects to take the result of the play. RULING: The coach may decline the obstruction penalty and accept the result of the play. The game continues with a runner on second base, one out and a count of 1-1. (8-1-1e)

SITUATION 15: With a runner on first base and no outs, the batter hits a high fly ball near the dirt/grass intersection between first base and second base. The runner was stealing on the pitch and, with his coach yelling for him to return, turns around and heads back to first base. The runner, as he returns, brushes the second baseman, who does not catch the pop fly. The second baseman quickly picks up the ball and throws to second base for an apparent force-out. No one says a word as the next batter comes to the plate with a runner on first base and one out. RULING: As soon as the runner from first contacts the second baseman attempting to catch the pop fly, interference should be declared and the ball made immediately dead. The runner is out for his interference; and because his interference prevented the catch of the pop fly, the batter-runner is also declared out. The next batter comes to bat with the bases empty and two outs. (8-4-2g)

SITUATION 16: With runners at second base and third base and one out, the infield is playing in to prevent the runner on third from scoring. The sharply hit batted ball goes up the middle, passing the pitcher, and the second baseman and shortstop. There is no other infielder in position to make a play on the ball. The batted ball hits the runner while he is standing on second base. RULING: The ball remains live and in play. The runner at second is not out as the ball had passed an infielder and no infielder was in position to make a play. (8-4-2k)

SITUATION 17: With a runner on second base, Smith, who is a pure pull hitter, comes to bat. The defense puts on a shift that has the shortstop playing near third base and the second baseman playing almost directly behind second base. The batter hits a sharp ground ball that contacts the runner who is standing on second base at the time. RULING: The ball is dead and the runner on second base is declared out. The second baseman is in position to make a play, and the base does not protect the runner when it is not an infield-fly situation. (8-4-2k)

SITUATION 18: With runners on third base and first base, there is one out and a count of 2-2 on the batter. The batter swings and misses the pitch for the third strike, as both runners are stealing on the pitch. The batter steps out across home plate and interferes with the catcher’s throw to second base. The throw is still made and is in time to retire the runner stealing from first base. The runner from third scores before the out on the runner at second is made. RULING: Since the throw from the catcher resulted in the out at second base, the interference by the batter is ignored. The run by the runner from third base will count since it occurred before the third out was declared at second base (time play). (7-3-5 Penalty, 9-1-1)

SITUATION 19: The runner at first base takes off in an attempt to steal second base. The pitcher legally makes a spin move and throws to unoccupied second base to easily retire the stealing runner. The third-base coach argues, saying the pitcher cannot throw to an unoccupied base. RULING: A pitcher may throw or feint a throw to an unoccupied base in an attempt to put out or drive back a runner. The out stands. (6-2-4b)

SITUATION 20: With runners at first base and second base, the runner at second bluffs a steal of third by running hard to third before he stops and retreats back to second base. The pitcher, seeing the runner take off hard to third base, legally throws to the unoccupied third base. The third-base coach wants a balk called on the pitcher since the runner from second stopped. RULING: A pitcher may throw or feint a throw to an unoccupied base in an attempt to put out or drive back a runner. As long as the umpire judges that it is reasonable for the pitcher to believe he had a play at third, even though the runner stopped, it is a legal move. (6-2-4b)

Last edited by APG; Wed Apr 16, 2014 at 02:05pm. Reason: Improve readability
  #6 (permalink)  
Old Wed Apr 16, 2014, 01:46pm
Official Forum Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Lincoln NE
Posts: 210
2014 NFHS Interps

Baseball Rules Interpretations - 2014
Publisher’s Note: The National Federation of State High School Associations is the only source of official high school interpretations. They do not set aside nor modify any rule. They are made and published by the NFHS in response to situations presented.
Robert B. Gardner, Publisher, NFHS Publications © 2014

SITUATION 1: With the bases empty, the batter’s backswing causes his bat to contact the catcher, thereby dislodging the baseball from the catcher. RULING: Since there was no play that could be made, there is no interference. Play will continue. (7-3-5c)

SITUATION 2: With the runner from third attempting to steal home, the batter swings and misses and his backswing contacts the catcher, causing him to drop the ball. The action occurs with a) one out or b) two outs. RULING: This is backswing interference. In a), the runner from third is out; in b), the batter is out. (7-3-5c Penalty)

SITUATION 3: R1 on first base gets a great jump on the pitcher's move and is sliding into second base when B2 swings and misses the pitch for strike three. B2's follow-through strikes the catcher. RULING: B2 is declared out for his interference and R1 is returned to first base. (7-3-5c Penalty)

SITUATION 4: R1 on first base attempts to steal second base and is about halfway to second when B2 swings and misses the pitch for strike three. B2's follow-through strikes the catcher causing him to drop the baseball. RULING: B2 is guilty of interference. Since the pitch was a third strike and B2's interference prevented a possible double play, both B2 and R1 are declared out. (7-3-5c Penalty)

SITUATION 5: The pitcher places his pivot foot on the pitching plate with the toe of the pivot foot in front of a line through the front edge of the plate and the heel of his pivot foot behind the back edge. His non-pivot foot is in front of the line extending through the front edge of the pitching plate. The pitcher attempted to pick-off the runner at second base. RULING: This is an illegal pitching position. When the pitcher moved in his pick-off attempt, he made an illegal pitch and a balk would be enforced. (6-1-2 Penalty)

SITUATION 6: The pitcher places his entire pivot foot on top of and parallel to the pitching plate. No part of his pivot foot is on or in front of the front edge of the pitching plate. His entire non-pivot foot is in a line with the pivot foot, on top of the pitching plate with no part of the non-pivot on or in front of the line of the front edge of the pitching plate. RULING: While this appears to be an unusual and a non-functional pitching stance, it is a legal wind-up position. (6-1-2)

SITUATION 7: The pitcher places his non-pivot foot on top of the pitching plate at a 45-degree angle with one-third of his pivot foot in front of the front edge of the pitching plate and the heel of his pivot foot behind the back edge of the pitching plate. His non-pivot foot is entirely in front of the front edge of the pitching plate. Without making any other movement, the pitcher places his pivot foot entirely behind the pitching plate. RULING: The pitcher initially assumed an illegal pitching position. Since he made no other movement, he is allowed to step back off of the pitching plate with his pivot foot and correct his illegal position. (6-1-2, 3)

SITUATION 8: The head coach appears at the game dressed in sweatpants and a sweatshirt. This combination is not an approved team uniform for a coach by the state association. RULING: The coach is restricted to the dugout for the balance of the game. He may coach his team from the dugout and provide instruction to his players. (3-2-1)

SITUATION 9: The home plate umpire, while positioned to make a call on a runner attempting to score, is hit by the ball in the mouth. His uniform shirt and pants become soaked with blood. RULING: The NFHS Sports Medicine Advisory Committee re-affirmed that if blood is on an umpire’s uniform, he will need to have it cleaned with the proper solution by a trainer, or change his uniform/ gear. If he is unable to do so and he does not have spare clothing, and his partner does not have any gear or uniform pieces that will fit, it is permissible to wear what is needed to be able to finish the game. (3-1-6)

SITUATION 10: With runners on third and first, the pitcher legally steps and feints to third and then legally turns and picks off the runner at first base. RULING: Provided all the aspects of the pick-off moves are legal, the out will stand. The “31” move is legal in high school baseball. (6-2-4)

Baseball Rules Interpretations - 2014
Publisher’s Note: The National Federation of State High School Associations is the only source of official high school interpretations. They do not set aside nor modify any rule. They are made and published by the NFHS in response to situations presented.
Robert B. Gardner, Publisher, NFHS Publications © 2014
  #7 (permalink)  
Old Wed Apr 16, 2014, 01:47pm
Official Forum Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Lincoln NE
Posts: 210
2014 NFHS Interps cont

SITUATION 11: As the head coach moves to the pitching mound for a defensive conference, he tosses a baseball to his third baseman and has him take warm-up throws with another player to get ready to pitch. RULING: A team cannot have a fielder, in the game, throw a baseball for the purpose of warming up as a pitcher, during a defensive conference or a pitching change. If a team desires to warm up a player in the game to prepare him to pitch, it would need to take him out of the game to warm up and then later re-enter him under the substitution rule. (3-4-1)

SITUATION 12: The visiting team has developed an orchestrated team action to cheer on a teammate to get a rally going. The action consists of a rhythmic series of hand claps and foot stomps. RULING: As long as the action is within the spirit of fair play, and not intended to induce a balk, create a distraction for the opposing team or intimidate/demean them, this action is acceptable. There have been some instances where a team, for example, begins to pound bats in the dugout only when the opposing pitcher begins to deliver a pitch. That action is clearly intended to gain an advantage and is not to be allowed. (3-3-1)

SITUATION 13: The home team has scheduled a game against Team A followed by a game against Team B. During the first game, a soft mist fell and the plate umpire believes he has the responsibility to determine if the field conditions are suitable for the second game. RULING: While the home team has scheduled two games on the same day, this should not be considered a doubleheader (two games between the same teams during the same day). The home coach has the responsibility to determine whether the grounds and other conditions are suitable for starting the game against Team B. (4-1-1)

SITUATION 14: In the fifth inning, the starting pitcher is removed for the first time in the game and goes to the bench. In the seventh inning, the original starting pitcher is re-entered to face the last batter. The opposing coach argues that the player cannot return to pitch, saying “once removed, he cannot come back to pitch.” RULING: If a starting pitcher was removed to the bench, he may return to pitch in a game provided a) he has re-entry eligibility; b) he faced the first batter of the game, or faced the first batter as a relief pitcher until that batter was on base or out or the third out of the inning occurred; c) his departure was not due to a violation of the defensive charged conference rule (fourth defensive conference in a seven-inning game); and d) his relief did not take more than eight warm-up throws. If those conditions are met, a pitcher may return to the mound. If a pitcher is removed and goes to another defensive position, he may be removed and return to pitch once an inning, provided the above requirements are met. (3-1-2, 3; 3-4-1 Penalty)

SITUATION 15: One of the players for the visiting team has beads in his hair. The home coach complains to the plate umpire that this is jewelry and the player may not participate in the game. RULING: Hair styles are as varied as players. One is not preferred over another with regard to baseball rules. A player with cornrows is as compliant as one with a flattop. Beads that are in the cornrows are considered to be a “hair adornment,” not jewelry. High school baseball rules have not concerned themselves with players’ hair styles or adornment. The beads are legal and the player may participate. (1-5-12)

SITUATION 16: Following a home run, the catcher picks up the bat, shakes it and hands it to the home plate umpire stating that the bat rattles. The home plate umpire verifies that the bat does rattle. The defensive coach wants the bat declared to be illegal and the appropriate penalties imposed. RULING: Per Rule 1-3-2a-3, “Each legal wood, aluminum or composite bat shall be free of rattles, dents, burrs, cracks and sharp edges.” A bat that has a rattle is an illegal bat. A player who uses one is subject to Rule 7-4-1 and his head coach will be subject to Rule 4-1-3b. The batter would be out and the head coach restricted/ejected. If the plate umpire did not notice the bat having a rattle prior to the at-bat, it should be assumed that the bat became illegal during the contact with the pitch and should not impose the penalties. The home run will count and the bat will be removed from further use in the game. (1-3-2-2a-3; 4-1-3b; 7-4-1)

SITUATION 17: The starting pitcher comes to the mound to take his warm-up throws to start the game. He is wearing a compression sleeve only on his throwing arm. The opposing coach demands that the sleeve be taken off before the pitcher may pitch. RULING: A pitcher may wear a compression or medical sleeve on one or both arms that is any color, including one that is white or gray, provided it does not extend below the elbow. A doctor’s signed permission slip is not required. If the pitcher wears a sleeve that extends below the elbow, it can be worn on either arm, provided it is not white or gray or have white/gray on it. It also cannot be of a color or color combination that would be deemed distracting by the plate umpire. (1-4-2; 6-2-1i)

SITUATION 18: B1 hits a home with an illegal bat. The bat was left not far from the plate area. B2 has taken his position in the batter's box and has received the first pitch for a ball. The plate umpire, noticing the bat used in the home run, walks over to get it back to the respective team's dugout. When he picks it up, he notices it is one of the bats that has been decertified by the NFHS. RULING: Since a pitch has been thrown to the next batter, B1's home run stands. B1's head coach, however, is still restricted to the dugout for his use of the illegal bat. (7-4-1a; 4-1-3b Penalty)

SITUATION 19: F7 makes a diving catch. As he slides over the line designating dead-ball territory, his feet remain in live-ball territory. Is the ball dead? RULING: The ball remains live and in play. F7 must be entirely in dead-ball territory before the ball shall be declared dead. As long as any part of F7's body is touching the designated dead-ball line, the ball remains live. (5-1-1i)

SITUATION 20: In the second inning, the field umpire ejects the first baseman of Team A from the game for objecting to a call. In the seventh inning, one of Team A’s players is injured, leaving it with only eight eligible players. The coach of Team A appeals to both umpires to allow his team’s ejected player to re-enter. RULING: The player may not be allowed to re-enter the game. An ejection is not retractable. (10-1-6)

SITUATION 21: As the home team prepares to take the field on defense, F2 pulls on his one-piece catcher’s mask/helmet as he sets up in the catcher’s box. Both the offensive team and umpire-in-chief notice that the catcher’s mask/helmet is one of the new ACME shiny-chrome, reflective-paint models. RULING: The umpire-in-chief instructs F2 to put on a compliant catcher’s mask/helmet, the outer cover of which shall have a non-glare surface. F2 explains that there is no other mask available; however, adding dull/matte black tape over the helmet would make the helmet less reflective, which would meet the criteria of the rule. There would be no penalty unless F2 does not comply with the umpire’s direction, then he would be ejected from the contest. (1-5-5)

SITUATION 22: R1 leads off the inning wearing a highly polished reflective batting helmet. The opposing coach inquires as to the legality of R1 wearing such a helmet as it would be distracting to his pitcher and the infielders. R1 and his coach explain that, a) the helmet meets the current NOCSAE performance standard for batting helmets; b) there is no rule prohibiting such product for use; and c) the player has a right to own and use the helmet when there is no rule preventing such use. RULING: The umpire explains that the use of such helmet presents a risk minimization issue for the team playing defense. The bright reflection of the sun off the helmet poses a dangerous situation for the defense. In a) and b), the fact that the helmet meets the NOCSAE performance standard for batting helmets is admirable and is compliant to NOCSAE standards; unfortunately, it is judged by the umpire to be unreasonably dangerous and is illegal for use. There are several rules references prohibiting the use of such equipment. (1-5-9,10) Regarding c), the player does have the right to own and use the helmet, just not for high school baseball competition. COMMENT: If the offensive team would like to use the batting helmet, it could make it less reflective by adding dull/matte black tape over the helmet in order to meet the intent of the rule.
  #8 (permalink)  
Old Wed Apr 16, 2014, 02:48pm
Stirrer of the Pot
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: Lowcountry, SC
Posts: 2,206
Just out of curiosity (and, No, I haven't taken the time to verify), does NFHS go back to make sure its old interpretations like the ones you posted from 2010 are still good under the latest rule set?

I umpire ASA Softball as well as baseball, and I have found rule interps on the ASA website as far back as 2007. I'm reluctant to use any of the old interps to discuss current rulings because they may have changed as the rules change.
__________________
"Let's face it. Umpiring is not an easy or happy way to make a living. In the abuse they suffer, and the pay they get for it, you see an imbalance that can only be explained by their need to stay close to a game they can't resist." -- Bob Uecker
  #9 (permalink)  
Old Wed Apr 16, 2014, 02:56pm
Official Forum Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 735
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert E. Harrison View Post
Bob and many others placed past rules interps on the Basketball board.
That would be a nice addition to the baseball board as well if anyone, Bob? (hint) or anyone, Mark? could come up with them and add to the top of the baseball board.
Just go here for 2014-2007: NFHS Rule Revisions 2007-2014
and here for 2006-1999: NFHS Baseball Rules Revisions 1999-2006

Keyword search using "find" tool in your browser.
  #10 (permalink)  
Old Wed Apr 16, 2014, 07:45pm
Official Forum Member
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Posts: 16,671
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manny A View Post
Just out of curiosity (and, No, I haven't taken the time to verify), does NFHS go back to make sure its old interpretations like the ones you posted from 2010 are still good under the latest rule set?
No, they do not. They do not keep old (even prior year) interps on their website.
  #11 (permalink)  
Old Wed Feb 11, 2015, 01:06pm
Official Forum Member
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Posts: 16,671
2015 NFHS Baseball Interpretations

Baseball Rules Interpretations - 2015
By NFHS on February 10, 2015 baseball

SITUATION 1: The lead-off batter comes to the plate wearing a batting helmet that has tape around and through one of the ear holes. When asked about the helmet, the batter says the helmet is in good shape with no cracks and the tape is present to hold the ear pad in place. RULING: The helmet is not legal. The batter must obtain a legal helmet, one that is free of cracks and damage and has no tape. (1-5-1, 4-1-3b)

SITUATION 2: In the second inning, a batter comes to the plate wearing a batting helmet that has a mirror-like glare surface to it. The plate umpire instructs the batter to obtain a legal helmet and asks the coach to remove this helmet from play. In the fifth inning, another batter for the same team comes to bat wearing a batting helmet with a mirror-like surface. The opposing coach inquires if the head coach of the offensive team should be restricted to the bench since this is the second instance of a batter wearing an illegal helmet. RULING: The coach of the offensive team is not restricted for this issue. The batter is instructed to replace his batting helmet with a legal one and to remove this helmet from play. (1-5-1, 4-1-3b Penalty)

SITUATION 3: An open media area was designated and properly lined before the game. The home coach has placed a video recording camera on a tripod in the media area. The opposing coach objects to the camera’s placement, stating that the camera must be in the dugout. RULING: This is legal. Video monitoring or replay equipment must be placed in the dugout or another dead-ball area. (3-3-1, 1-2-8)

SITUATION 4: The home coach has expanded both dugouts legally and has placed a video camera in the expanded area. The opposing coach tells the plate umpire that he thought the equipment must be within the confines of the structure of the dugout. RULING: This is legal. Video monitoring or replay equipment must be placed in the dugout or another dead-ball area. (3-3-1, 1-2-8)

SITUATION 5: The home coach has placed a wireless camera in the stands behind the dugout which transmits its recording to a monitor in the dugout. RULING: This is legal. Video monitoring or replay equipment must be placed in the dugout, stands or another dead-ball area. (3-3-1, 1-2-8)

SITUATION 6: To obtain information on the opposing pitcher, the team is using a radar gun in (a) its own dugout or (b) in the stands, where it is being handled by a parent of the team. RULING: Legal in both (a) and (b). (3-3-1)

SITUATION 7: An assistant coach in the uniform of his team, is sitting in the stands recording the game and using a radar gun on his pitcher. RULING: While it is legal for a camera or radar gun to be placed in the stands, it may not be used by a coach, player, attendant or other bench personnel. The assistant coach must be in the dugout or a dead-ball area inside the confines of the field. (3-3-1i)

SITUATION 8: As the pitcher looks into the catcher for a sign, the batter is moving his bat back and forth across the plate. The batter accidentally contacts the catcher with his bat during this movement. RULING: This is backswing interference. The ball is immediately dead and all players are provided time to regain their positions. (2-21-5, 5-1-1n, 7-3-7 Penalty)

SITUATION 9: With a crucial play at the plate not going his way, the coach of the defensive team checks his replay equipment and sees that the call of safe was not correct. He calls time and approaches the plate umpire with his tablet to show him the call needs to be reversed. RULING: The plate umpire may not use videotape or replay equipment for the purpose of rendering a decision. The plate umpire should professionally inform the coach that he cannot look at the video play and request that he return to the dugout. (10-1-5)

SITUATION 10: After bringing in a substitute pitcher, the defensive head coach is still at the mound after the eighth warm-up pitch. Shall a defensive conference be declared by the plate umpire? RULING: To maintain a solid pace of play for the game, the coach should be on his way back to the dugout at the conclusion of the pitcher’s warm-up throws. If the coach lingers, the plate umpire should ask the coach if he wants a defensive conference to now be charged and, if not, the game needs to resume. (3-4, 2015 Points of Emphasis)

SITUATION 11: After a team’s player has hit a go-ahead home run, the team gathers around home plate to congratulate him. RULING: Since the ball is dead with the home run, the players may gather outside the dugout to congratulate their teammate. However, they must provide the plate umpire the ability to observe all the players on base touch home to verify that they scored. Preventative umpiring by the plate umpire, urging players to stay away from the plate, may assist in this need. (2015 Points of Emphasis)

SITUATION 12: In the fifth inning, the batter hits a bases-clearing home run for the fifth hit in a row by his team. As his teammates gather to congratulate him, one of them taunts the catcher with a comment on all the hits that have occurred. RULING: While it is acceptable for a team to celebrate and congratulate each other on such an exciting event, good sportsmanship must be maintained. The plate umpire should immediately warn and/or eject depending upon the content of the comment. (3-3-1f-2, 2015 Points of Emphasis)

SITUATION 13: Following the completion of the game, one of the umpires is still within the confines of the field. The losing coach berates him for his performance and directs some inappropriate language toward him. RULING: Since both umpires have not left the confines of the field following the completion of the game, the umpire still has jurisdiction over the game. The umpire may warn or eject the coach, even though the game is over. (10-1-2, 2015 Points of Emphasis)

SITUATION 14: After the umpires have left the field following the conclusion of the game, the visiting coach and some of the parents follow the umpires to their cars to state their opinions on the umpires’ performance. RULING: The umpires are to be left alone and allowed to leave the field without being subject to poor sportsmanship. While the umpires no longer have jurisdiction to eject a player or coach, a report should be made to the state association concerning the incident. (10-1-2, 2015 Points of Emphasis)

SITUATION 15: A batter with his foot on the ground completely outside the lines of the batter’s box hits the pitch which goes directly to the catcher’s hands and is caught by the catcher. RULING: The batter is out and the ball is dead. (7-3-2)

SITUATION 16: The batter legally contacts the pitch with his bat and his lead foot then lands on the ground outside of the batter’s box. The batted ball contacts the ground in front of home plate and spins back, contacting the batter’s leg that is outside the batter’s box. RULING: This is a foul ball. With one foot still in the batter’s box, the batter is considered to be in the batter’s box at the time he was contacted by the batted ball. (2-16-1g)

SITUATION 17: With first base empty, the batter swings and misses the pitch for strike three. The catcher is unable to catch the pitch, which rolls some distance away from home plate. The batter moves from the batter’s box to first base and the plate umpire goes up the first base foul line to observe the batter advancing in the running lane. The catcher’s throw hits the umpire in the back and rebounds away, allowing the batter-runner to easily advance to first base. RULING: The ball remains live and in play. This is not umpire interference as he did not hinder the catcher’s attempt to throw. Proper use of umpire mechanics would prevent this from happening. (2-21-2)

SITUATION 18: The batted fly ball lands past first base in fair territory and rebounds into foul ground. The base umpire, mistakenly declares “Foul Ball.” The plate umpire, having a great view of the ball, immediately overrules the base umpire and declares the hit to be fair. RULING: Since the base umpire declared it to be a foul ball and it did touch the ground, it is a foul ball and immediately dead. The plate umpire cannot overrule the call. (2-16-1e, 5-1-1h)

SITUATION 19: Caught in a rundown between home and third, R2 is returning to third base when the catcher throws the ball to the third baseman who is covering the base. The third baseman does not catch the ball, which is caught by the shortstop who is backing up the play behind third base. Everyone else, including the third baseman, believes the third baseman has the ball when he tags R2 as he slides back into third base. The third baseman shows the umpire an empty glove and is confused as R2 safely slides into third base. The offensive head coach wants the umpire to declare a fake tag and award R2 home. RULING: This is not a fake tag. The third baseman simply did not catch the ball. (2-22-2)

SITUATION 20: The batter hits the ball to the shortstop who bobbles the ball and throws late to first base. The batter-runner beats the throw but does not touch first base. RULING: The runner beats the ball on the play and is considered to be safe. The defense must appeal the missed base or tag the batter-runner before he returns to first in order to have the out declared for the missed base. (8-2-1 Penalty)
  #12 (permalink)  
Old Thu Feb 11, 2016, 12:49pm
Archaic Power Monger
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 5,981
Baseball Rules Interpretations - 2016

Baseball Rules Interpretations - 2016
By NFHS on February 05, 2016

SITUATION 1: A head coach uses vulgar and profane language when addressing the base umpire. The base umpire ejects the head coach without first issuing a warning. RULING: When an unsportsmanlike act using profane language directed at an umpire is judged to be a major violation, the penalty is an immediate ejection. No warning is necessary. (3-3-1f2 Penalty)

SITUATION 2: A written warning accompanied by a bench restriction must occur prior to an ejection. RULING: If an unsportsmanlike act is judged to be a major violation, an ejection may be made without a prior warning being given. Additionally, there are specific acts in Rule 3-3-1l-q, where the penalty is an immediate ejection. (3-3-1f-k Penalty, 3-3-1l-q Penalty)

SITUATION 3: A head coach is upset about a close call at home plate. During an animated discussion, he bumps the plate umpire. RULING: The head coach is ejected. Physical contact with an umpire, even if unintended or accidental, shall result in an ejection of the offender. (3-3-1q Penalty)

SITUATION 4: The first base assistant coach is upset over an “out” call on a steal at second base. The assistant coach goes to the area around second base and, while arguing the call, kicks dirt on the base umpire. RULING: The assistant coach is ejected; no warning is needed prior to the ejection. The head coach is restricted to the bench for the remainder of the game. (3-3-1q Penalty, 3-3-1f6 Penalty)

SITUATION 5: During the course of the game, the plate umpire has utilized numerous non-verbal, preventative warnings to the head coach. In the sixth inning, the coach continues to complain about various calls and is ejected by the plate umpire. RULING: Unless the last event was a major unsportsmanlike act, the head coach must first receive a written warning and be restricted to the bench before an ejection. (3-3-1f Penalty, 10-2-3j)

SITUATION 6: Having previously received a written warning and a restriction to the dugout for a minor unsportsmanlike outburst, the coach again loudly complains about the plate umpire’s strike zone and performance. RULING: The coach is ejected from the game. Having been previously warned and restricted to the bench, any subsequent minor or a major violation results in ejection. (3-3-1f Penalty)

SITUATION 7: What is a head coach who is restricted to the bench allowed to do? RULING: Even though the head coach is restricted to the bench and may not occupy a coaching box, he is still the head coach. He still represents the team in communications with umpires and may address and coach base runners, the batter, defensive players and other coaches. He may hold team conferences at the dugout or bench area. He may leave the bench/dugout area to attend to a player who becomes ill or injured and may request to talk to an umpire concerning a rule or rule enforcement. However, he shall be ejected for any further misconduct. (3-2-1, 3-3-1f Penalty)

SITUATION 8: What may a coach who is ejected do? RULING: A coach who is ejected shall immediately leave the vicinity of the playing area and is prohibited from further contact – direct or indirect – with the team during the remainder of the game. His presence away from the field shall be such that he cannot be seen or heard from the playing field. He may return when requested to attend to an ill or injured player. (3-3-2)

SITUATION 9: A pitcher comes to the mound wearing a “camouflaged” compression sleeve that does not extend below the elbow. RULING: A camouflaged compression sleeve worn by the pitcher is legal. (1-4-2)

SITUATION 10: A pitcher is wearing a compression sleeve on his pitching arm that extends to his wrist. The compression sleeve is a solid black color. RULING: This compression sleeve is legal. Compression sleeves worn by the pitcher that extend below the elbow shall be solid black or solid dark color. (1-4-2)

SITUATION 11: The pitcher has a white compression sleeve that extends only to his elbow on his (a) pitching arm, (b) non-pitching arm or (c) both arms. RULING: This is legal in (a), (b) and (c). Compression sleeves worn by a pitcher that extend only to the elbow may be white, gray, solid black or a dark color. Compression sleeves may be worn on one arm (pitching or non-pitching) or both arms. (1-4-2)

SITUATION 12: The pitcher is wearing a long, dark black compression sleeve to his wrist on one arm and a white compression sleeve that extends only to the elbow on the other arm. RULING: This is legal provided the plate umpire does not judge this to be distracting to a batter. (1-4-2; 6-2-1f)

SITUATION 13: The pitcher has a compression sleeve that extends to his wrist. The portion of the sleeve that is below the elbow is a dark solid color, while the portion of the sleeve that extends to the elbow is white. RULING: This is illegal. A compression sleeve that extends below the pitcher’s elbow must be solid black or a solid dark color. (1-4-2)

SITUATION 14: The home team is wearing a vest-type uniform with a white shirt worn underneath. The sleeves of the shirt under the vest extend only to the elbow. RULING: This is legal. A pitcher’s shirt worn under the vest is not an undershirt. It may be white, provided it does not extend below the elbow. (1-4-2)

SITUATION 15: The visiting team is wearing a vest-type uniform with a white shirt worn underneath. The sleeves extend to the players’ wrists. The plate umpire informs the coach that this is not legal for the pitcher. The pitcher changes to a black shirt under the vest with sleeves that extend to his wrists. The opposing coach argues that this is not legal as uniforms must be of the same color and style. RULING: It is legal, in this instance, for the pitcher to wear a shirt under his vest of a different color than the rest of the team. Any sleeve worn by the pitcher that extends below his elbow must be a solid black or a solid dark color. (1-4-1, 1-4-2)

SITUATION 16: The catcher helps warm up a pitcher in (a) the bullpen or (b) on the field. He takes a crouch position and is wearing a skull cap and a catcher’s mask that is not attached. RULING: This is not compliant equipment for the catcher. The catcher’s helmet and mask combination shall meet the NOCSAE standard and shall have full ear (dual ear flaps) protection. (1-5-4)

SITUATION 17: A left-handed pitcher attempts to pick-off the runner at first base. Simultaneously with his throw, the pitcher picks up his pivot foot and places it behind the pitcher’s plate. The throw bounces off the first baseman’s glove and goes into dead-ball territory. The base umpire awards the runner third base, ruling that the pitcher was an infielder and the award is two bases. RULING: The award should be second base; only one base. The status of the pitcher at the time he made the attempted pick-off throw was still that of a pitcher, not an infielder. After the pitcher places his pivot foot on the ground clearly behind the pitcher’s plate, his status then changes to that of an infielder. Moving his pivot foot at the same time he attempts the pick-off does not change his status as a pitcher. (6-1-3, 8-3-3d)

SITUATION 18: With a runner on first and no outs, the batter hits the pitch in the left-center gap and R1 attempts to reach third base. The center fielder overthrows third base and the pitcher, backing up the play, catches the throw, and then steps into the dugout. RULING: This is a two-base award to both runners, awarded from the time the pitcher stepped into the dugout. The throw from the outfielder was complete when the pitcher caught it, and the subsequent action is a new one. If both runners are between second and third, they both will be awarded home. If they were both between first and second, R1 is awarded third and the batter is awarded second base. (5-1-1i, 8-3-3c2, 8-3-5)

SITUATION 19: R1 is attempting to score from third base and is obstructed by the catcher who tags him on the play. After the play is over, the home plate umpire declares “Time” and awards the runner home. R1 does not touch home plate. The next batter enters the batter’s box and the plate umpire announces “Play.” The pitcher next requests “Time” and appeals the runner not touching home plate. RULING: This is a legal appeal. The runner will be declared out and the run will no longer count. All bases must be touched, even on an award. A dead-ball appeal may be made before the next legal or illegal pitch. (8-2-1, 8-2-5 Penalty)

SITUATION 20: The batter singles to right field and (a) the ball rolls to a stop and the right fielder, attempting to pick up the ball, kicks it into dead-ball territory; or (b) the bounding ball strikes the right fielder’s leg and deflects into dead-ball territory. RULING: In (a), the right fielder applied the impetus that caused the ball to go into dead-ball territory, the same as if he had thrown it there. The award to any runner is two bases from the base occupied at the time of the kick. In (b), the force on the batted ball caused the ball to go into dead-ball territory, so the award to any runner is two bases from the base occupied at the time of the pitch. (8-3-3c, 8-3-5)
__________________
Even if you’re on the right track, you’ll get run over if you just sit there. - Will Rogers
  #13 (permalink)  
Old Sun Mar 26, 2017, 09:41am
Stop staring at me swan.
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 2,969
2017 NFHS Interpretations

SITUATION 1: The coach runs out of the dugout, yelling profanity and throwing his hat at the base umpire as he disputes a call. RULING: When an unsportsmanlike act involving profane language directed at an umpire is judged to be a major violation, the penalty is an immediate ejection. No warning is necessary. These actions warrant an immediate ejection. (3-3- 1f2 Penalty)

SITUATION 2: While objecting to a call, the head coach commits what he believes is a minor offense. However, due to the nature of the offense, the umpire issues a written warning and restricts the coach to the dugout. The coach states that since he has not yet received a verbal warning, he cannot be given a written warning and subsequently be restricted to the bench. RULING: A coach does not have to first receive a verbal warning to receive a written warning. The three options available to an umpire do not have to be completed in succession. Umpires do not have to give a verbal warning before issuing a written warning. Additionally, for major offenses, an offender shall be ejected immediately. The coach is restricted to the dugout. (3-3-1fk Penalty)

SITUATION 3: In the third inning, the head coach was restricted to the bench/dugout because one of his players was discovered to be using an illegal bat while at bat. In the fifth inning, the head coach commits a minor violation in arguing a call. The minor violation by itself does not warrant an ejection. RULING: The head coach is eject-ed. Because the head coach was previously restricted, he shall be ejected for any subsequent offense. (3-3-1f Penalty, 4-1-3b Penalty)

SITUATION 4: After a close play at second base on an attempted steal where the base umpire judged the runner out, the player addresses the umpire with his thoughts on the umpire’s decision. RULING: Since the statements by the player are such that they cannot be ignored, the player is ejected. Players, except for illegal substitution, cannot be restricted to the bench for misconduct. (3-1-1, 3-3-1f2 Penalty)

SITUATION 5: Early in the game, the home team received a team warning for a player wearing a bandanna. A few innings later the coach argues a call and is issued a verbal warning. Because of the previous team warning the coach is ejected. RULING: Incorrect procedure. The previous team warning is just that – a warning to the team with the next offender on the team being ejected. It is not an action against the head coach. All the coach has received is a verbal warning for his actions in arguing a call and is not restricted. (3-3- 1d Penalty, 3-3-1f Penalty)

SITUATION 6: For a minor offense in the third inning, the head coach was restricted to the bench. In the fifth inning, his assistant coach leaves his coaching box to object to a call at second base. RULING: The assistant coach will receive a written warning and will be restricted to the dugout for the remainder of the game. With the head coach already restricted, he is now ejected from the game due to the penalty for the assistant coach leaving his coaching box to argue a call. (3-3-1f6 Penalty)

SITUATION 7: With bases loaded and no outs, the batter hits a slow ground ball to the shortstop, who fields the ball and throws home. The runner from third base slides in a direct line between third base and home plate and arrives at home before the ball arrives. The runner’s slide carries the runner over home plate and into the catcher, who is now unable to make a play on another runner because of the contact by the runner. There was nothing malicious in nature with the slide. RULING: Because the runner slides in a direct line between the two bases, it is permissible for his momentum to carry him through the plate in the baseline extended. With the slide being legal, merely sliding past home and into a fielder does not constitute an illegal act. The runner is safe and there is no resulting penalty. (2-32-2c)

SITUATION 8: With runners on second and third, the third-base runner is taking his lead-off position well in foul territory to the side of third base. The batter hits a ground ball to the second baseman, who fields the ball and throws home in an attempt to put out the runner advancing from third. The runner from third base, still in the base path he established when he first attempted to advance home, slides over home plate and into the catcher. The catcher was knocked down by the contact from the runner from third base and is unable to make a play on the batter-runner advancing to second base. RULING: Since the runner from third base slides in a straight line in his established base path, and there are no other aspects of the slide present that would make the slide illegal, the run counts and play continues. There is no penalty on the play. (2-32-2c)

SITUATION 9: The runner from third base slides past home plate, out of his established base path. He then contacts the catcher, preventing him from making a play on the runner at second base. RULING: If the play at home plate was a non-force play, the run would count, but the ball would be dead when the runner contacted the catcher. An out on the runner at second base would be called due to the third-base runner’s interference. If the play began as a force play, because the runner slides out of his base path, this is now force-play slide interference. The ball is immediately dead, the run will not count, and the runner plus the batter-runner will be declared out. (2-32- 2c, 8-4-2b Penalty)

SITUATION 10: The home team believes the visiting team’s pitcher has violated the state’s pitch-count policy by exceeding the maximum number of pitches as his team leads in the sixth inning, 8-0. The home team asks the plate umpire to forfeit the game or, at a minimum, have the pitcher removed as a pitcher. RULING: Each state association will set its own regulations and protocols for violation of Rule 6-1-6. The umpire should suggest the coach contact and/or notify the state association. (6-1-6)
__________________
It's like Deja Vu all over again
Closed Thread

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
NFHS Past Interpretations Archive (2017-2018 Added) Nevadaref Basketball 43 Thu May 10, 2018 09:41am
2016 NFHS rules presentation john5396 Baseball 2 Sun Feb 14, 2016 02:34pm
2008 NFHS Interps Rich Baseball 6 Thu Feb 07, 2008 11:41am
State Interps of FED rules PeteBooth Baseball 3 Fri Feb 23, 2007 07:08pm
2003-2004 NFHS Interps Are Posted bob jenkins Basketball 9 Mon Oct 20, 2003 01:44pm


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:10pm.



Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.3.0 RC1