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Old Mon Jul 08, 2002, 12:10pm
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In watching a game over the weekend, I noticed that a batter was clearly standing out of the batters box (or what was left of it)while batting. Why is the box chalked if the umpires allow players to erase it?
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Old Mon Jul 08, 2002, 12:21pm
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I don't know what level game you were watching, but it's not unusual for an umpire to find that an amateur field has been mismarked---including the batting boxes.

Depending on the location and degree of variance with such mismarked fields, umpires should address the situation at pregame and cover under ground rules. At times, that may mean rubbing out the lines of a mismarked batting box.


Just my opinion,

Freix

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Old Mon Jul 08, 2002, 12:58pm
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Cool

Good answer, Steve.

Another point; the batter's box includes the lines. Many players try to gain an advantage by taking up every inch of the box (the lines are part of the box). In planting their rear foot, many times the lines get erased or covered with dirt.

I know the originator said the batter was obviously outside the box, but if there were no lines, I'm not clear on why he felt that way. Evidently the PU felt the batters were indeed within the 6' box, or at least "close enough" considering there were no lines.

On fields where I work, if no lines are marked, you really have to go by eyesight and "feel" or estimate it with a 36" bat. I've never had a big problem, at any age group or at any time in my 20-year career with having batters be in the box . . . lined or otherwise.

It seems as if the defense raised an issue, PU would have done something about it. Yes?
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Old Mon Jul 08, 2002, 01:33pm
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Thanks for the responses! This was a major league game on television. Within the first inning and a half, the rear line of the box was eliminated by batters. Is this just considered a non-issue?
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Old Mon Jul 08, 2002, 01:40pm
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NOW it makes sense! It is absolutely a non-issue. In MLB, you've got fastballs travelling in excess of 100 mph. A batter will indeed try to gain every possible inch he can. Again . . . the lines are part of the box . . . soooooo, if you can "erase" them, you've got pretty much another couple of inches to work with. Nobody at that level's gonna squawk too much. You don't see too many million dollar babies standing up front in the box, do you?

Jerry
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Old Mon Jul 08, 2002, 01:46pm
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Thanks, Jerry! This now makes perfect sense to me. As a basketball official, I am now curious what issues non-basketball officials might have about the hoops game? Have you ever wondered about something basketball officials do nor do not do? I would be interested in hearing. And thanks again for the clarification.
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Old Mon Jul 08, 2002, 02:18pm
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Consider that the batter's box lines
are only 6 inches from the sides of
home plate. A size 9 shoe can have
it's heel on the line, and it's toe
on the plate.
Still legally "in the batter's box."
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Old Mon Jul 08, 2002, 02:20pm
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That was the Giants - D'backs game and the batter was Craig Counsell. I was surprised the umps didnt call anything. I would have called him out. As far as basketball...you blow the whistle to damn much...Kidding
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Old Mon Jul 08, 2002, 03:30pm
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Marty - when you get ready to bat, both feet have to be entirely in the box.

The size 9 bit only applies when you hit the ball.
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Old Mon Jul 08, 2002, 03:45pm
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Richard, I agree with you! Believe it or not, though, I think that most officials are actually looking for ways not to blow the whistle. In other words, how can I keep control of the game using non-whistle blowing techniques? Nothing is worse for all involved (players, coaches, fans and officials) than a whistle-fest.
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Old Mon Jul 08, 2002, 04:32pm
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Umpires have a lot of things to watch before, during and after a pitch is delivered, especially at the MLB level.

On Saturday night, while working a 18U plate, I had it brought to my attention by the catcher that the batter was setting up out of the box.

The first pitch delivered after being told I saw the batter slide his back foot toward the mound as the ball was delivered. He ended up on the line as he swung. The next pitch I missed because I was watching that silly back foot. I think it was strike 3, which if I had called as such I could have got home a few minutes earlier.

The moral of the story is...Worry about the big stuff, like balls, strikes, safes and outs.

It is pretty easy for the announcers using multiple cameras to see things from their air conditioned perch in the press box. They know little to nothing about what it is like umpiring a game.
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Old Mon Jul 08, 2002, 05:37pm
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But it can be big stuff if the game is on the line. I have worked many Mens Baseball leagues and you always have enough time to checkout a batters position.. I do. Have called a few people out on it. But true I do see your point about some people not caring about the small stuff. Counsel did the same thing last year in the World Series. Can the out come of some games be different if the Umps worried about it? So I guess the moral of my story is it does count to worry about the small things. And as an Ump its our job to.
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Old Mon Jul 08, 2002, 10:23pm
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Quote:
Originally posted by paulis
Thanks, Jerry! This now makes perfect sense to me. As a basketball official, I am now curious what issues non-basketball officials might have about the hoops game? Have you ever wondered about something basketball officials do nor do not do? I would be interested in hearing. And thanks again for the clarification.
Why doesnt' the NBA have rules?

Wouldn't it be great to see the game played as basketball like they do in the NCAA.
That's NCAA basketball, I mean. Not NCAA football like Shaq uses........
So much talent and so little rules.........
There was once a time in their lives when they used rules, though.........


Freix

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