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Old Tue May 09, 2017, 06:00pm
JRutledge JRutledge is online now
Do not give a damn!!
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: On the border
Posts: 28,184
1. Foul reporting
a. Make sure that our officials clear the players, clear the 3-point arc and have line of sight with the scorer (page 23 of the 2016-17 Mechanics Manual). Walking to the table from lead is unacceptable, put some zip into your movement to report.

b. When you call a foul in your primary area, report the foul to the table. We need to force switches in order to get officials in different positions on the floor.
2. Stopping the clock – Previous Mechanics Manuals referred to this as we “would like” the official to stop the clock. This year’s manual will make stopping the clock mandatory. Stopping the clock will make us better officials, allow ourselves additional time to gain insights on each
play as they happen and eliminate blarges from our game (page 25).

3. Communication – It is very important after a foul is called that we communicate effectively. Often times, our officials have a favorite “signal” that they use at the scorer’s table or at the spot of the foul. It is the official’s responsibility to communicate “what happened” on each
play using the appropriate signal (pages 78, 83-85, 88, 116, 121, 123 and 148-158).

4. Staying at trail after a foul – Again this year, staying at trail after reporting a foul will be an option if the official feels that he may have a chance to defuse a coach. Officials need to be aware of the coach’s reactions and utilize this mechanic as needed to help the game.

5. The “legally walled up signal” – The legally walled up signal was used during the 2016-17 season. This signal will be used again in 2017-18 and should only be used by the lead official. The center and trail should not be using this signal during live play.

6. Clock awareness – The 2017-18 mechanics manual will stress the importance of clock awareness. We are developing the suggested mechanics and will communicate those during the fall clinics.

7. Lead position – Throw-ins:
a. During a half court throw-in, the lead should position himself according to page 63 of the Mechanics Manual. We are choosing to go inside the player too often.

b. During a backcourt baseline throw-in, the lead official will be given the option to stay on one side of the lane and bounce the ball to the offensive player on the other side of the lane when there is no pressure. This will decrease the number of times the center and trail have to reset and change position. This will be detailed in the fall clinics.
8. Positioning

a. Trail official
(1) Should have an initial starting position at or near the 28’ hash.

(2) Should close down to get the best angle to officiate each play
(pages 29-30). In addition, it is important that our trail official does not “bail out” to begin covering a play at the other end.

(3) Should move 1-2 steps high or low to obtain a better angle between players depending on the movement of the ball. It is important to move with a purpose and not get straight lined by your movements.

(4) Should release plays that curl away from you to the new primary official.

(5) Should focus on obvious “reset the feet” travels on the perimeter and travels in the post.
b. Center official
(1) Should have an initial starting position at or near the free throw line extended.

(2) Should close down to get the best angle to officiate each play (pages 31-32).

(3) Should move 1-2 steps high or low to obtain a better angle between players depending on the movement of the ball. It is important to move with a purpose and not get straight lined by your movements.

(4) Should not leave a “good view” of an active play just because the lead rotated. After the “active play” has changed rotate to your proper position.

(5) Should officiate primary defenders on block/charge plays to the rim from
center side.

(6) Should officiate the restricted arc line on secondary defenders on block/charge plays to the rim from center side.

(7) Should release plays that curl away from you to the new primary official.

(8) Should focus on obvious “reset the feet” travels on the perimeter and travels in the post. Find the pivot in the post!
c. Lead official
(1) Should mirror the ball at Lead. It is imperative that we begin to close down as the ball moves toward the opposite side. This will allow us to be in a better position to rotate, if a rotation is needed (pages 26-28).

(2) Should officiate all primary and secondary defenders on block/charge plays to the rim down the lane and from strong side.

(3) Should officiate secondary defenders on block/charge plays initiated from
weak side.

(4) Should “take fouls to the table” on all plays to the rim in his primary area of responsibility when calling a foul.
9. Rules Committee action

The rules committee will meet May 9 – 12, 2017, in Indianapolis. All rules changes and impacted mechanics will be shared with you during the fall clinics.
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