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APHP Thu Jan 10, 2002 01:23pm

96-97, 97-98, 98-99, 99-00, 00-01 Basketball Casebook Plus (sometimes called the Officials Guide) is Published and sold by Referee Magazine & NASO and written by George Demetriou, Bill Topp & Steve Ellington. The following is a caseplay that appears in "all" these books, beginning back as far as I can find-1996.

Quote---"When thrower A1 releaes a pass from behind the out-of-bounds line, a team B player may immediately reach through the boundary-line plane. (9-2-11 Schindler Interp.)"

Immediately below this is the following caseplay::::
Quote---"As A1 releases the ball, B3 reaches across the boundary-line plane and bats the ball into A's feet. Ruling: FED: Legal play. A1 has violated by being the first player to touch the ball out-of-bounds; team B's ball for a throw-in."

Trust Me (ChuckElias) Coach.

ChuckElias Thu Jan 10, 2002 01:44pm

Quote:

Originally posted by APHP
96-97, 97-98, 98-99, 99-00, 00-01 Basketball Casebook Plus (sometimes called the Officials Guide) is Published and sold by Referee Magazine & NASO and written by George Demetriou, Bill Topp & Steve Ellington.

Immediately below this is the following caseplay:
Quote---"As A1 releases the ball, B3 reaches across the boundary-line plane and bats the ball into A's feet. Ruling: FED: Legal play. A1 has violated by being the first player to touch the ball out-of-bounds; team B's ball for a throw-in."

Trust Me (ChuckElias) Coach.

Well, that's the first time I've ever seen that interpretation in writing, I have to admit. However, I notice that it doesn't come from NFHS. It comes from NASO and Referee Magazine. Would anyone care to comment on the accuracy of Referee Magazine's rules interpretations in the past?

Additionally, I simply don't think that the interpretation is supported by the rules. It's ok for the defense to touch the ball while it's still OOB, but it's not ok for the offense to do it? I don't buy it.

Chuck

Mark Padgett Thu Jan 10, 2002 02:06pm

Chuck, I read your previous post on this and also this one (obviously). I think you make some good points to support your position, but I think there can be points made the other way, also.

Here's what I mean. Your point that the casebook, while stating B1 can break the plane after the ball is released toward the court but does not specifically say he can then touch the ball, is a good point. But what is the sense of letting him break the plane if he can't touch the ball? Isn't trying to deflect the pass the reason he is breaking the plane in the first place?

One point I can't really refute well is the equity argument that if the offense can't do it, then the defense can't either. This same theory is used by the NF on a weird play involving the inbound where if A1 inbounds with a pass that goes over the cylinder and B1 jumps and touches the ball in the cylinder, it is BI, even though if the ball went in without being touched, it is a violation. The rationale is that if A2 touched the ball in the cylinder for an alley-oop, it is offensive BI, so if the restriction applies to the offense, it should apply to the defense also.

Frankly, I think they should change this rule. Not all NF rules are based on the equity theory anyway. Yeah - here's where I mention my pet peeve about including possession in the penalty for technical fouls, which is an inequitible penalty.

I always consider all restrictions to end on the defender when the inbounder releases the ball toward the court. However, on an inbound play following a made or awarded score, I call a T if B1 breaks the plane and touches the ball if A1 was passing to A2 who is also OOB. The key here is "toward the court", which is language straight from the rule book.

Dan_ref Thu Jan 10, 2002 03:33pm

NCAA & NFHS differ. Under NCAA 7-6-4b:

"Until the thrown-in ball crosses the plane of the sideline
or endline...No opponent of the thrower-in shall have any
part of his or her person over the inside plane of the
sideline or endline;"

The rule is different under NFHS where an opponent
can extend over the OOB line upon the release of the ball.

Mark Dexter Thu Jan 10, 2002 03:34pm

Quote:

Originally posted by Mark Padgett
I always consider all restrictions to end on the defender when the inbounder releases the ball toward the court. However, on an inbound play following a made or awarded score, I call a T if B1 breaks the plane and touches the ball if A1 was passing to A2 who is also OOB. The key here is "toward the court", which is language straight from the rule book.
Plus, that's a specific casebook play. (10.3.12B)


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