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-   -   Slapping the Backboard: Historical Inquiry (https://forum.officiating.com/basketball/104833-slapping-backboard-historical-inquiry.html)

crosscountry55 Tue Dec 03, 2019 09:49am

Slapping the Backboard: Historical Inquiry
 
NFHS 10-4-4b is currently written to basically penalize with a technical foul what would be considered basket interference in the NCAA. The exception would be a legitimate attempt to block a shot resulting in incidental backboard contact; in NFHS this would be nothing, while in the NCAA it could still result in BI regardless of intent.

Sometime around 2008, slapping the backboard had become an epidemic, and the NFHS responded with technical foul language that said “slapping the backboard to draw attention to one’s self” was a TF. I noticed this language is no longer there, replaced with the new 10-4-4b language that looks a lot like the collegiate BI rule yet isn’t actually BI. My question for the attic archivists on this forum is, when did this change, and was there any pre-season guide or interp guidance that came along with it?

I still have trouble convincing peers (even my local rules interpreter) that calling BI for a backboard slap has no rules coverage in NFHS. I’m hoping a better understanding of the evolution of 10-4-4b will help me make my case.


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BillyMac Tue Dec 03, 2019 11:51am

For The Good Of The Cause ...
 
10-4-4-B: A player shall not: Illegally contact the backboard/ring by: Intentionally slapping or striking the backboard or causing the ring to vibrate while a try or tap for field goal is in flight or is touching the backboard or is in the basket or in the cylinder above the basket.

BillyMac Tue Dec 03, 2019 11:57am

Article A ...
 
Not asked for, but I have some historical perspective for Article A.

10-4-4-A: A player shall not: Placing a hand on the backboard or ring to gain an advantage.

Ralph Sampson’s (Virginia 1979-1983, NBA 1983-1995) controversial basket against Brigham Young in the 1981 NCAA tournament prompted an NCAA rule change. The seven foot, four inch Virginia Cavalier All-American center dunked the ball with his free hand braced against the backboard. The basket led to a five point swing for Virginia which capitalized on a technical foul against Brigham Young's Danny Ainge who thought Sampson's play was illegal. Actually Sampson did nothing wrong since, at the time, there was no rule making this an illegal play. Since 1983 NFHS rules now state that it’s illegal for player to place a hand on the backboard, or the ring, to gain an advantage.

BillyMac Tue Dec 03, 2019 11:59am

Not Historical ...
 
Certainly not historical, but this is from my list of The Most Misunderstood NFHS Basketball Rules:

The backboard has nothing to do with goaltending. Goaltending is when a player touches the ball during a try, or tap, while it is in its downward flight, entirely above the basket ring level, outside the imaginary cylinder above the ring, and has the possibility of entering the basket. On most layups, the ball is going up immediately after it contacts the backboard, and in this situation it is legal for a defender to touch the ball if it is not in the imaginary cylinder above the basket. Slapping or striking the backboard is neither basket interference, nor is it goaltending, and points cannot be awarded. A player who intentionally or deliberately slaps or strikes a backboard, during a tap, or a try, so forcefully that it cannot be ignored because it is an attempt to draw attention to the player, or a means of venting frustration, may be assessed a technical foul. When a player simply attempts to block a shot, and accidentally or incidentally slaps the backboard, it is neither a violation, nor is it a technical foul.

BillyMac Tue Dec 03, 2019 12:22pm

1996-97 ...
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by BillyMac (Post 1035679)
10-4-4-B: A player shall not: Illegally contact the backboard/ring by: Intentionally slapping or striking the backboard or causing the ring to vibrate while a try or tap for field goal is in flight or is touching the backboard or is in the basket or in the cylinder above the basket.

2019-20 above. 1996-97 (the oldest book in my library) below:

10-3-6: A player shall not: Slap or strike either backboard or cause either ring to vibrate while the ball is in flight during try or tap or is touching the backboard or is in the basket or in the cylinder above the basket ...

BillyMac Tue Dec 03, 2019 12:41pm

2000-01 Intentionally Added ...
 
2000-01 NFHS 10-3-6-B: A player shall not: While a try or tap is in flight or is touching the backboard or is in the basket or in the cylinder above the basket, intentionally slap or strike the backboard or cause the ring to vibrate.

Comments On The 2000-01 Rules Revisions

Clarification Of Illegal Contact With The Backboard (10-3-6): Clarified illegal contact on the backboard by stating that a player shall not ... while a try or tap is in flight or is touching the backboard or is in the basket or in the cylinder above the basket, intentionally slap or strike the backboard or cause the ring to vibrate. The previous rule was difficult to understand and consequently was being called incorrectly and/or inconsistently.

Play: A1 tries for a goal and scores. B1 jumps to black the shot but misses the block and touches the backboard after the ball passes his/her hand and into the basket. Ruling: The goal counts. No technical foul is called. The purpose of the rule is to penalize intentional or deliberate contact with the backboard. Contact that occurs incidentally in playing the game is permitted.

BillyMac Tue Dec 03, 2019 01:00pm

Good Vibrations (The Beach Boys, 1966) ...
 
https://tse3.mm.bing.net/th?id=OIP.B...=0&w=241&h=182

If my memory serves me correctly, previous to 2000-01, when "intentionally" was added to the rule, officials had to observe and note if the ring vibrated (or not) due to a slap or strike on the backboard while the ball is in flight during try or tap.

Back then, before the rule change, if the ring vibrated, be it by an intentional, deliberate, incidental, or accidental slap, or strike, a technical foul was charged.

Of course, back in ancient times, most backboards were bolted to the walls of the gymnasium, and didn't hang from the ceiling, or from free standing stanchions.

It would take a major earthquake to vibrate most backboards back then.

Am I right Mark T. DeNucci, Sr?

BillyMac Tue Dec 03, 2019 01:08pm

Quiz Tomorrow ...
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by BillyMac (Post 1035688)
It would take a major earthquake to vibrate most backboards back then.

More backboard history:

Darryl Dawkins (NBA 1975-1989), the Philadelphia 76ers six foot, eleven inch, 251 pound center, in a game against the Kansas City Kings at Municipal Auditorium on November 13, 1979 dunked and broke the backboard sending the King’s Bill Robinzine ducking away. Three weeks later he did it again, this time at home against the San Antonio Spurs at the Spectrum. Thus, Dawkins became famous for his backboard shattering dunks and is credited for being the player to cause the NBA to introduce breakaway rims. Breakaway rims are now an essential element of the game of basketball. A broken backboard or distorted rim could delay a game for hours. In 1981 the NFHS adopted specifications for breakaway rims.

Shaquille O'Neal (LSU 1989-1992, NBA 1992-2011) a seven foot, one inch, 325 pound center, was one of the heaviest players ever to play in the NBA. O'Neal dunked with so much power that he broke the steel supports holding backboards during games against the New Jersey Nets and the Phoenix Suns while playing for the Orlando Magic during the 1992–93 NBA season. This prompted the NBA to increase the strength and stability of the backboard supports and change the stanchion design for the following 1993–94 season. The NFHS added backboard support specifications to the rules in 1996-97.

BillyMac Tue Dec 03, 2019 01:21pm

Off The Glass ...
 
More backboard history.

My town had the first glass backboards Connecticut. They're still in the ancient building that used to be the high school that is now an elementary school where recreation and travel games are now played.

A teacher colleague of mine played basketball at this former high school. The entry to the gymnasium was on the endline directly under the backboard. As visiting fans entered the gym they would all take a few seconds to look at these amazing glass backboards.

Oddly, only a part of the backboard was glass. It was wood from the bottom of the backboard to the level of the ring. The ring was attached to the wood portion. It was glass from that level to the top of the backboard.

Freddy Tue Dec 03, 2019 01:31pm

Quote:

Originally Posted by crosscountry55 (Post 1035673)
...the NFHS responded with technical foul language that said “slapping the backboard to draw attention to one’s self” was a TF. I noticed this language is no longer there...

That language is located here:
10.4.4 SITUATION: A1 tries for a goal, and (a) B1 jumps and attempts to block the shot but instead slaps or strikes the backboard and the ball goes into the basket; or (b) B1 vibrates the ring as a result of pulling on the net and the ball does not enter the basket. RULING: In (a) legal and the basket counts; and (b) a technical foul is charged to B1 and there is no basket. COMMENT:The purpose of the rule is to penalize intentional contact with the backboard while a shot or try is involved or placing a hand on the backboard to gain an advantage. A player who strikes either backboard so forcefully it cannot be ignored because it is an attempt to draw attention to the player, or a means of venting frustration may be assessed a technical foul pursuant to Rule 10-3-6.

crosscountry55 Wed Dec 04, 2019 09:45pm

Quote:

Originally Posted by Freddy (Post 1035692)
That language is located here:

10.4.4 SITUATION: A1 tries for a goal, and (a) B1 jumps and attempts to block the shot but instead slaps or strikes the backboard and the ball goes into the basket; or (b) B1 vibrates the ring as a result of pulling on the net and the ball does not enter the basket. RULING: In (a) legal and the basket counts; and (b) a technical foul is charged to B1 and there is no basket. COMMENT:The purpose of the rule is to penalize intentional contact with the backboard while a shot or try is involved or placing a hand on the backboard to gain an advantage. A player who strikes either backboard so forcefully it cannot be ignored because it is an attempt to draw attention to the player, or a means of venting frustration may be assessed a technical foul pursuant to Rule 10-3-6.



Ah, yes. It’s in the case play of course. Thanks! Interesting that it says the part about drawing attention or venting frustration is a situation where a T “may” be assessed. But if it’s during a try/tap, the implication is that the official gets less decision latitude and is expected to whack the player.


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BillyMac Thu Dec 05, 2019 11:45am

Intentional ...
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by crosscountry55 (Post 1035748)
But if it’s during a try/tap, the implication is that the official gets less decision latitude and is expected to whack the player.

Never in person, but I've seen video where the defender slaps the left side of the backboard on a right side layup, obviously intentional, technical foul charged, but the official still can't score the basket if the ball doesn't go in.

BillyMac Thu Dec 05, 2019 12:28pm

Professional And Proper Terminology ...
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by BillyMac (Post 1035757)
... the official still can't score the basket if the ball doesn't go in.

Sorry, I forgot about NFHS professional and proper terminology.

Got to set a good example for the young'uns.

... the official still can't score the goal if the ball doesn't go in.

"Score", or "count", or "award"? What's professional and proper?

I'm so confused, or should I say bewildered, or perplexed?

Raymond Thu Dec 05, 2019 02:42pm

Quote:

Originally Posted by BillyMac (Post 1035758)
Sorry, I forgot about NFHS professional and proper terminology.

Got to set a good example for the young'uns.

... the official still can't score the goal if the ball doesn't go in.

"Score", or "count", or "award"? What's professional and proper?

I'm so confused, or should I say bewildered, or perplexed?

I broke my habit of saying "basket good" or "score the basket" because of a D1 evaluator pointing it out to me.

ilyazhito Thu Dec 05, 2019 02:55pm

Award the goal. This would cover both cases where there was a foul in the act of shooting, and the try scores and cases of defensive basket interference or goaltending, where the points are awarded regardless of whether the ball actually enters the basket.


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