The Official Forum

The Official Forum (https://forum.officiating.com/)
-   Basketball (https://forum.officiating.com/basketball/)
-   -   Go to phrases for coaches/players (https://forum.officiating.com/basketball/103554-go-phrases-coaches-players.html)

gogumakilla Mon Feb 19, 2018 10:44am

Go to phrases for coaches/players
 
I am working on using short and sweet statements for coaches to effectively get a point across without having lengthy dialogue, either to explain calls or addressing behavior. I would love to hear what you guys use so I can improve my communication and game management skills. Thanks.

Mark Padgett Mon Feb 19, 2018 10:49am

My favorite is: "Solly. No speekie Engrish".

johnny d Mon Feb 19, 2018 11:24am

Players are simple:

Stop the ****ing nonsense and play basketball

You are not good enough to play and officiate at the same time, so stop complaining and just play

sdoebler Mon Feb 19, 2018 11:26am

Coach he (partner) had a different angle.

Big_Blue_Wannabe Mon Feb 19, 2018 11:28am

Quote:

Originally Posted by johnny d (Post 1017441)
Players are simple:


You are not good enough to play and officiate at the same time, so stop complaining and just play


This one sounds great for using with rec leaguers. Iím stealing it for next year.



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Valley Man Mon Feb 19, 2018 11:35am

"Shake your head your eyes are stuck"

"Get off your knees and blow the game"

Oh wait .. I think this is the wrong "go to" list:D

sj Mon Feb 19, 2018 11:44am

After time is up when trying to explain a rule to a coach....Coach. I tell you what. If I'm wrong I'll give you 50 bucks.

BillyMac Mon Feb 19, 2018 04:14pm

From The Topeka (Kansas) Officials Association ...
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by gogumakilla (Post 1017436)
I am working on using short and sweet statements for coaches to effectively get a point across without having lengthy dialogue, either to explain calls or addressing behavior. I would love to hear what you guys use so I can improve my communication and game management skills. Thanks.

Communication With Coaches

General Techniques:


Statements by coaches don’t normally need a response. Answer questions, not statements.
Let the coach ask their question first, before speaking. Be a responder, not an initiator.
Most coaches will have questions when they believe the officials have missed an obvious call.
Having the officials in closer proximity often calms down the coach.
Be in control and speak in calm, easy tones. Be aware of your body language; maintain positive and confident
body language.
Make eye contact with the coach when the situation allows.
Do not try to answer a question from an out of control coach; deal with the behavior first.
If you’ve missed a call or made a mistake; admit it. This technique can only be used sparingly, perhaps
once a game.
Don’t bluff your way through a call.
Do not ignore a coach.

Specific Communication Examples:

Coach sees the play very differently than the official:
“Coach, if that’s the way it happened/what you saw, then I must have missed it. I’ll take a closer look next
time.”
“Coach, I understand what you’re saying, however, on that play I didn’t see it that way. I’ll keep an eye for it
on both ends.”
“Coach, we’ll watch for that on both ends.”
“Coach, I had a good look at that play and here’s what I saw (short explanation).”
“Coach, I was in a good position to make that call.”
“Coach, I understand what you’re saying, but my angle was different than yours.”
“Coach, I had a great look at that play, but I understand your question and I’ll have the crew keep an eye on it.”
“Coach, I had that play all the way and made the call.”

Coach believes you’re missing persistent illegal acts by the other team:
“OK coach, we’ll watch for that.”
“Coach, we are watching for that on both ends of the court.”
“Coach, I hear you, and I’ll work hard to get a better view.”

Coach is questioning a partner’s call:
“Coach, that’s a good call, as a crew we have to make that call.”
“We’re calling it on both ends.”
“Coach, he/she was right there and had a great angle.”
“Coach, we’re not going there, I can’t let you criticize my partner.”
“Coach, he/she had a great look, but if you have a specific question, you’ll have to ask him/her, he/she’ll be
over here in just a minute.”
“Tell me, I’ll ask him.”

Coach is very animated and gesturing:
“Coach, I’m going to talk with you and answer your questions, but you must put your arms down/stop the
gesturing.”
“Coach, please put your arms down. Now, what’s your question?”

Coach is raising their voice asking the question:
“Coach, I can hear you. I’m standing right here, you don’t need to raise your voice.”
"Coach, I need you to stop raising your voice and just ask your question calmly.”
“Coach, stop yelling across the court, I’m right here.”

Coach is commenting on something every time down the floor:
“Coach, I need you to pick your spots, we can’t have a comment on every single call that is being made.”
"Coach, I can't have you officiating this game."
"Coach, I understand you're not going to agree with all of our calls, but I can't have you question every
single one."
"Coach, if you have a question, I'll answer if I have a chance, but we aren't going to have these constant
comments."
“Coach, I will listen to you, but you can’t officiate every play.”

Coach has a good point and might be right.
“You’ve got a good point and might be right about that play.”
“You might be right, that’s one we’ll talk about at halftime/intermission/the next time out.”
“You might be right; I may not have had the best angle on that play.”
“Coach, I missed it.”

Coach is venting, make editorial comments:
“I hear what you’re saying”
“I hear what you’re saying, but we’re moving on.”

Coach just won’t let it go:
“Coach, I hear you, but we’re moving on.”
“Coach, enough.”
“I’ve heard enough and that’s your warning.”

Source: Topeka (Kansas) Officials Association

gogumakilla Mon Feb 19, 2018 04:40pm

Wow, this is great material. Thank you BillyMac.

ballgame99 Wed Feb 21, 2018 09:47am

Billy's list pretty well covers it all, but the key phrase when asked about a call your partner made is "he/she had a great angle.." They don't want to hear anything about your "area" or anything like that. But if its way out of your primary you can say "I'm not even looking over there but my partner had a great angle"

bob jenkins Wed Feb 21, 2018 09:50am

Quote:

Originally Posted by ballgame99 (Post 1017534)
Billy's list pretty well covers it all, but the key phrase when asked about a call your partner made is "he/she had a great angle.." They don't want to hear anything about your "area" or anything like that. But if its way out of your primary you can say "I'm not even looking over there but my partner had a great angle"

It also works to tell them "I was watching numbers xx and yy in the post" (or whatever)

JRutledge Wed Feb 21, 2018 09:57am

To players
 
"This is not the NBA, stop coming to me every time there is a call."

"I was not the one that made the call, ask him (pointing too), he will explain it to you."

They usually get frustrated and stop asking questions. Problem solved. ;)

Peace

CJP Wed Feb 21, 2018 10:22am

Using terms out of the rule book such as legal guarding position, displacement, and incidental contact has gotten me out of some potentially contentious situations with coaches. They usually back off because many have no clue what the rule book says.

BillyMac Wed Feb 21, 2018 03:28pm

Steps ??? We Don't Count No Stinkin' Steps ...
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by CJP (Post 1017543)
Using terms out of the rule book such as legal guarding position, displacement, and incidental contact has gotten me out of some potentially contentious situations with coaches. They usually back off because many have no clue what the rule book says.

Agree.

Also, when confronted with a coach questioning a travel/nontravel call, be sure to identify the pivot foot (left, or right (best guess if you have to)) and what that pivot foot did, or didn't do. This will usually disarm a coach because they usually want to talk about the number of steps, which, of course, as we all know (but they don't) has very little to do with a travel call.

"Coach. His right foot was the pivot foot and it never returned to the floor before the shot was released".

"Coach. Her left foot was the pivot foot and after being lifted it touched the floor before she released the pass".

"Coach. His right foot was his pivot foot and he lifted it off the floor before releasing the ball to start a dribble".


Coaches want to talk about the number of steps so when you come back at them talking about which foot was the pivot foot and what that foot did, or didn't do, it confuses them for a second, they figure that you know what your talking about, and they shut up, or you're long gone up the court.

https://tse1.mm.bing.net/th?id=OIP.a...=0&w=220&h=182

gogumakilla Wed Feb 21, 2018 11:20pm

Really good stuff about explaining pivot foot over # of steps. I will incorporate that into my games. Also good stuff CJP, thanks.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:53pm.



Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.3.0 RC1