The Official Forum  

Go Back   The Official Forum > Baseball

View Poll Results: Is this runner out of his baseline?
Yes 12 41.38%
No 17 58.62%
Voters: 29. You may not vote on this poll

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)  
Old Mon Jan 20, 2014, 11:59am
Official Forum Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 15
Running out of the baseline

Do you think this runner is out of his baseline?
TubeChop - USSSA Fall National Championship (Wood Bat/BBCOR) Part 1 (00:15)


Last edited by APG; Mon Jan 20, 2014 at 02:00pm. Reason: embedded clip
Reply With Quote
  #2 (permalink)  
Old Mon Jan 20, 2014, 12:50pm
Official Forum Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Walnut Creek, CA
Posts: 154
Hard to tell since you can't see where he was in relation to the plate at the time the tag was attempted. He MAY have been running well to the outside (dugout side) of the baseline in which case his direct line, (his "basepath") (plus 3 feet) to the plate would put him outside of the catchers reach/lunge. But from what I see I'd go with "yes" - out of the basepath

Last edited by BSUmp16; Tue Jan 21, 2014 at 04:36pm. Reason: Corrected "basepath" to "baseline" and vice versa per Rich Ives and OBR
Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old Mon Jan 20, 2014, 01:00pm
Official Forum Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 2,279
Quote:
Originally Posted by BSUmp16 View Post
Hard to tell since you can't see where he was in relation to the plate at the time the tag was attempted. He MAY have been running well to the outside (dugout side) of the basepath in which case his direct line (plus 3 feet) to the plate would put him outside of the catchers reach/lunge. But from what I see I'd go with "yes" - out of the baseline
How does his relation to the plate play into this?

If you freeze it when the catcher starts his tag attempt, the runner is already in the grass on the foul side of the line. I don't think there's any way he goes more than three feet to avoid the catcher's tag once it is attempted. I have nothing on this.
Reply With Quote
  #4 (permalink)  
Old Mon Jan 20, 2014, 03:17pm
Official Forum Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Upper Midwest
Posts: 928
Quote:
Originally Posted by zm1283 View Post
How does his relation to the plate play into this?
Because that's the definition of basepath.

As for my thoughts, pretty much the same as BS's.
__________________
"I don't think I'm very happy. I always fall asleep to the sound of my own screams...and then I always get woken up to the sound of my own screams. Do you think I'm unhappy?"
Reply With Quote
  #5 (permalink)  
Old Mon Jan 20, 2014, 03:17pm
Official Forum Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Posts: 3,227
What zm1283 said.

Way too many people can't separate "the baseline" from "his baseline" and mess up the call.
__________________
Rich Ives
Different does not equate to wrong
Reply With Quote
  #6 (permalink)  
Old Mon Jan 20, 2014, 04:40pm
Official Forum Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Walnut Creek, CA
Posts: 154
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rich Ives View Post
What zm1283 said.

Way too many people can't separate "the baseline" from "his baseline" and mess up the call.
That's why I used the term "basepath" to denote the direct path between the bases and "baseline" to denote the line established by the runner between himself and the base to which he is running. In this case the basePATH is a direct line between 3rd and home. As I said in my post, I can't tell exactly what the runner's baseLINE is. However, in this situation the end point of both the baseline and the basepath is home plate
Reply With Quote
  #7 (permalink)  
Old Tue Jan 21, 2014, 09:57am
Official Forum Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Posts: 3,227
Quote:
Originally Posted by BSUmp16 View Post
That's why I used the term "basepath" to denote the direct path between the bases and "baseline" to denote the line established by the runner between himself and the base to which he is running. In this case the basePATH is a direct line between 3rd and home. As I said in my post, I can't tell exactly what the runner's baseLINE is. However, in this situation the end point of both the baseline and the basepath is home plate
Problem here is that the actual OBR rule uses the term "his base path" for the runner.
__________________
Rich Ives
Different does not equate to wrong
Reply With Quote
  #8 (permalink)  
Old Tue Jan 21, 2014, 10:39am
Official Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Bay Area, CA
Posts: 323
His basepath is established when a play is attempted on him. The basepath is a direct line between the runners position and the base he is going to or coming from. Judging from this video, I have nothing. Runner is safe. The umpire should be more enthusiastic with his call.
__________________
"That's all I have to say about that."
Reply With Quote
  #9 (permalink)  
Old Tue Jan 21, 2014, 11:03am
Official Forum Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 2,279
My point was that the plate isn't relevant until the tag is attempted. I might have misinterpreted BSUmp's original post.
Reply With Quote
  #10 (permalink)  
Old Tue Jan 21, 2014, 04:32pm
Official Forum Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Walnut Creek, CA
Posts: 154
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rich Ives View Post
Problem here is that the actual OBR rule uses the term "his base path" for the runner.
Ok - Then swap "basepath" for "baseline" and vice versa in my original post - better?
Reply With Quote
  #11 (permalink)  
Old Tue Jan 21, 2014, 06:39pm
Stop staring at me swan.
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 2,974
At first glance which is what this umpire had...I'm saying not out of his base path. I can see the other side too though.
__________________
It's like Deja Vu all over again
Reply With Quote
  #12 (permalink)  
Old Tue Jan 21, 2014, 09:11pm
JJ JJ is offline
Veteran College Umpire
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: IN
Posts: 1,122
Out of the baseline. Catcher's standing on the foul line, and in the video the runner took a step further away from him - making it more than an arm's length. Of course, the plate umpire had a little different angle AND he could see the entire path of the baserunner AND he didn't call him out so...NOT out of the baseline. Or not.

JJ
Reply With Quote
  #13 (permalink)  
Old Tue Jan 21, 2014, 09:16pm
Official Forum Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Upper Midwest
Posts: 928
Quote:
Originally Posted by JJ View Post
Out of the baseline. Catcher's standing on the foul line, and in the video the runner took a step further away from him - making it more than an arm's length. Of course, the plate umpire had a little different angle AND he could see the entire path of the baserunner AND he didn't call him out so...NOT out of the baseline. Or not.

JJ
Arm's length from what?
__________________
"I don't think I'm very happy. I always fall asleep to the sound of my own screams...and then I always get woken up to the sound of my own screams. Do you think I'm unhappy?"
Reply With Quote
  #14 (permalink)  
Old Wed Jan 22, 2014, 02:13am
Is this a legal title?
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 360
I don't know if he was, but based on that view, I think I would have called him out. In order to judge the three feet, once a tag is attempted I watch the second and third steps.

Usually the first "go-around" step (if the runner is going to the back side of the plate) is with the right leg, and covers three feet. That's what this runner did. The second step is a recovery step. If that step crosses the go-around step, I have a violation. That runner's did not, so nothing--yet.

The third step should take the runner back toward his original path. This runner's third step appeared from that angle to be farther from his original path than the go-around step. I'd say he's out of his baseline.

If I had that PU's view, I might not think so.
Reply With Quote
  #15 (permalink)  
Old Wed Jan 22, 2014, 09:46am
Official Forum Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Katy, Texas
Posts: 8,033
Quote:
Originally Posted by BSUmp16 View Post
That's why I used the term "basepath" to denote the direct path between the bases and "baseline" to denote the line established by the runner between himself and the base to which he is running. In this case the basePATH is a direct line between 3rd and home. As I said in my post, I can't tell exactly what the runner's baseLINE is. However, in this situation the end point of both the baseline and the basepath is home plate
If you're going to do that, I would suggest reversing your terms. Base LINE is defined - it's the path between bases. The rule we're discussing says base PATH - which (most often, at least) means the path the runner is on.
__________________
I was thinking of the immortal words of Socrates, who said, 'I drank what?'

West Houston Mike
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
running baseline fan Basketball 16 Wed Oct 17, 2007 02:15pm
running out of baseline? TriggerMN Baseball 19 Mon Jul 18, 2005 10:17pm
Running the Baseline Hartsy Basketball 1 Tue Jan 13, 2004 04:29pm
Running the Baseline Viking32 Basketball 11 Wed Jan 22, 2003 01:14pm
Running baseline ugafan Basketball 4 Tue Jan 14, 2003 09:22am


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:20pm.



Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.3.0 RC1